GOLD2024

CASA of DuPage County, Inc.

Change a Child's Story

aka CASA of DuPage   |   Wheaton, IL   |  https://dupagecasa.org/

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Mission

CASA of DuPage County’s mission is to recruit, train and support volunteer advocates to effectively speak to the best interests of abused, neglected, and dependent children in the DuPage County court system. CASA’s vision is that every child deserves a safe, permanent, nurturing home.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Suzanne Skala

Main address

505 N County Farm Road, Suite #3C

Wheaton, IL 60187 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3875807

NTEE code info

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CASA directly serves this underserved population of children by recruiting, training, and supervising volunteers from the very community these children reside. These community volunteers take on the responsibility to act in a child’s best interest in the court room and in the community. Their involvement helps ensure that every child will receive services they need, as court-ordered by the judge. Family reunification is CASA’s goal for every family, requiring volunteer advocates to engage and connect with all adults important in the child’s life. The presence of a CASA volunteer advocate helps ensure the child will not experience re-abuse or re-entry into the foster care system. Volunteer advocates often assist the parents and/or foster parents with connection to community services that will help prevent substance abuse issues, eviction, homelessness, and unemployment. They have the community knowledge and resources needed to help our families access the services they need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Child Advocacy

The CASA program ensures the best interest of each child by recruiting and training community volunteers to visit with the child(ren), monitor their safety, and report to the court so the Juvenile Court Judge can make an informed decision on the child's living situation. After the information is presented to the court, the Judge may issue a court order outlining specific services for the child to receive, such as healthcare or counseling. In addition, advocates are typically assigned to one case at a time and stay until the case is resolved, making them a consistent source of support for the child(ren).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National CASA Association 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of cases monitored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, At-risk youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, At-risk youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Advocacy

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal 1 - Ensure 100% of the children in DuPage County juvenile court are appointed a CASA advocate. This can be measured by court reports of juvenile abuse and neglect cases. Although the number of children entering juvenile court cannot be predicted, we estimate 300-350 children will be served, 80% of these children will have resided in households with domestic violence, mental health concerns, and/or substance abuse issues.

Goal 2 - Ensure children's physical and mental health needs are met. CASA advocates are trained in trauma informed care and recognize child's behaviors indicating they may benefit from mental or physical health services. The advocate will include this in the court report resulting in the judge issuing a court order for services. CASA advocates assure access to care by assisting with finding care providers, transportation and scheduling appointments.

Goal 3 - Provide educational advocacy connecting children with community services. In addition to immediate and extended family members, CASA advocates connect with teachers and caregivers. Tutoring, counseling, or special assistance needed is in the court report, and court orders are issued. The CASA assists with connecting children with educational support services and other community services including sports programs, life skills classes, etc.

CASA of DuPage County provides a trained community volunteer who becomes the most consistent concerned adult in the child's life. Advocates help ensure each child's best interests, well-being, and safety. CASA's professional staff must maintain a high standard of quality volunteers, who are carefully screened and trained with CASA's evidence-based service model. Each volunteer must be properly screened, background checked and interviewed to be sure they are the right fit for the program. Once accepted, they attend a 30-hour training program to help prepare them to understand their responsibilities to the child and to the court system. There is a significant amount of information to cover, as each case, each child, each family is different. Each CASA advocate is appointed a CASA staff supervisor who carefully and intentionally works to match each volunteer's experience with the cultural and emotional needs of each child and closely supervises advocates to help them navigate the child welfare system and connect children with community services.

Volunteers are recruited, trained, and supervised by CASA of DuPage County's professional staff, including four staff advocate supervisors who manage a caseload of 35-50 volunteers, serving 75-90 children each. They are overseen by a Program Director who also manages all new volunteer recruitment, training, and ongoing education for the volunteer advocates. These professional staff members have the knowledge and expertise to assist the volunteers to navigate various complicated situations and challenging family dynamics they are facing. CASA advocate supervisors have built strong community connections with service providers for counseling, food, housing and furniture assistance, tutoring, and other essential needs. Once a child/family is connected with CASA of DuPage, they have the opportunity to receive ample services from our partners in the community.

Each CASA volunteer is required to complete background checks, fingerprinting and interviews; followed by an initial training program. They are also expected to complete at least 12 hours of continuing education annually. CASA of DuPage County provides a large number of the education programs, in addition, all volunteer advocates can participate in CASA training offered by National CASA and Illinois CASA.

CASA of DuPage County has a 30-year history in providing victim advocacy to abused and neglected children in the DuPage County court system. The programming staff has longevity, the four advocate supervisors have all been with CASA for more than seven years and the program director has been with CASA for 20 years. CASA DuPage also has a consistent and respectful connection to and partnership with the legal and child welfare professionals involved in juvenile court.

This ongoing program will be sustained through CASA's strong board of directors, dedicated volunteers, and committed staff. Each of these groups believe in and embrace the mission of the organization. Revenue from special events, individual donors and private foundations has remained consistent, and supported this programming.

The number of children who will be served in the future is unknown, but every child in these circumstances deserves to have a CASA to represent their best interests. It is essential that all active advocates remain current
and in compliance with standards and new volunteers are identified, screened and trained to ensure that a highly trained advocate is available to be assigned to each new case that comes into the system.

CASA works closely with the child welfare team, the DuPage County Judiciary, the State's Attorney's Office, and numerous nonprofit and social service welfare agencies. CASA of DuPage County is often at the center of
communication and networking with the appropriate agency that can provide services the child and family needs.

DuPage CASA is also an active member of the National and Illinois CASA Associations where conferences are attended and participants have the opportunity to learn and share best practices with other CASA programs.
CASA of DuPage County is active locally with many social service and community groups including Rotaries, Kiwanis clubs, chambers and other service clubs that also provide volunteers, funding and in-kind items.

CASA of DuPage County has been serving juvenile victims of abuse and neglect for 30 years and currently is operating a successful evidence-based program model with proven results. The program is one of 31 Illinois State CASA programs and one of nearly 1,000 nationwide. CASA of DuPage County is an active member of both the State and National CASA organizations and operates its juvenile abuse and neglect program in compliance with CASA program standards. DuPage County CASA is appointed to every juvenile abuse and neglect case as according
to Illinois statute. During 30 years of service, CASA of DuPage has provided court appointed special advocates for more than 3,000 children in DuPage county.

Financials

CASA of DuPage County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CASA of DuPage County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Katie Yoder

Fifth Third Bank

Term: 2018 - 2024

Katie Yoder

Fifth Third Bank

Chris Larrabee

Benjamin F. Edwards

Scott Drumheller

Griffin Williams LLP

Sandy Higgins

Capstone Financial Advisors

Neil Lichtman

Retired Adverstising Executive

Greg Maksimuk

Schiller, DuCanto & Fleck

Danielle Marshall

Edward Jones

Karen Patton

Former CASA Staff and Advocate

Lee Roupas

Assistant State's Attorney, DuPage County

Luke Vanderbloemen

Alston Construction Company

Gene Wollaston

Retired Engineer

Mark Bridges

MBB Consulting Solutions

Veronica Cecil

Black Pearl Consulting, LLC

Cate Economos

EE Consulting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/06/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.