ACADEMY FOR EATING DISORDERS

Reston, VA   |  www.aedweb.org

Mission

Founded in 1993, the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED) is a global professional association committed to leadership in eating disorders research, education, treatment, and prevention. Learn more about AED's founding history. The goal of the AED is to provide global access to knowledge, research and best treatment practice for eating disorders. AED helps physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, nutritionists, academic researchers, students and experts through lived experience connect and collaborate with each other and keep abreast of recent developments in eating disorders research. AED hosts the Annual International Conference on Eating Disorders, a scientific conference that spans research and education from basic science to cutting edge emerging research in the field.

Ruling year info

2014

President

Jennifer D Lundren PhD, FAED

Main address

11130 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite 350

Reston, VA 20191 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3929097

NTEE code info

Eating Disorder, Addiction (F53)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

AED works tirelessly to increase global access to knowledge, research and best treatment practice for eating disorders.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED)

The ICED is the premier gathering place for professionals and advocates engaged in research, treatment and prevention of eating disorders. Each year, ICED attendees, faculty, supporters and exhibitors create a unique, inspiring and intense environment for education, training, collaboration and dialogue.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The AED offers webinars to its membership on timely, relevant topics and research.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The AED offers continuing education credits for specifically chosen articles published in the International Journal for Eating Disorders

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of new organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Academy for Eating Disorders is a global professional association committed to leadership in eating disorders research, education, treatment, and prevention. Our goal is to provide global access to knowledge, research and best treatment practice for eating disorders. For the public via its website, AED provides education on eating disorder symptoms and treatment recommendations. AED helps researchers connect and collaborate with each other and keep abreast of recent developments in eating disorders research. . AED's main event is the annual International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED), a scientific conference that spans research and education from basic science to the treating clinician; ICED is attended by leading international researchers and includes presentations and discussions on the cutting edge of research in the field. Media are invited to attend the ICED.

Generate knowledge and integrate collective expertise about eating disorders

Provide platforms to promote understanding, sharing of knowledge, and research practice integration

Building capacity in the next generation of eating disorder professionals

Foster innovation and best practice by recognizing excellence in the field of eating disorders

Ensure that eating disorders are addressed on a unified global basis by building relationships around the world

Increase awareness among policy regulators and funders of the importance of eating disorders research and treatment

Build the capacity and sustainability of AED

The AED works with our partners and members all over the world to increase knowledge, sharing of information and encourages research to better serve the patient population, especially in countries where there is little or no information available to treat those struggling with eating disorders.

We are slowly, but surely adding members and activities in additional countries around the world. We are working with other Eating Disorder organizations to educate providers in new countries, and strengthening the education available throughout the world. We have recently added chapters in Europe and the Middle East. A chapter is in Asia in the process of forming.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, nutritionists, academic researchers, students and experts through lived experience with eating disorders.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

ACADEMY FOR EATING DISORDERS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ACADEMY FOR EATING DISORDERS

Board of directors
as of 10/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennifer D Lundgren, PhD, FED

Rachel Bachner-Melman, PhD, FAED

Millie Plotkin, MLS

Jennifer Thomas, PhD, FAED

Ross Crosby, PhD, FAED

Kelly Bhatnagar, PhD, FAED

Unna Danner, PhD

Ursula Bailer, MD, FAED

Jennifer Lundgren, PhD, FAED

Lesley Williams, MD, CEDS

Suzanne Dooley-Hash, MD, FAED

Gry Tellus

PhD

Karen Mathis-Jennings

PhD, RN, APRN, FAED

Jerel Calzo

PhD, MPH, FAED

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/27/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.