Employment, Job Related

CAREER TRANSITIONS CENTER OF CHICAGO

A Career Resource Built Around You

Chicago, IL

Mission

The Career Transitions Center of Chicago's mission is to empower professionals to find meaningful employment.

Ruling Year

1997

Executive Director

Ms. Anita Jenke

Main Address

703 W. Monroe Street

Chicago, IL 60661 USA

Keywords

Chicago Metropolitan Area

EIN

36-4084309

 Number

4616027671

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Vocational Counseling / Guidance / Testing (J21)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The unemployment rate for people over 40 years of age is 13%, which includes discouraged workers, those actively seeking work and those working part-time involuntarily. With job searches lasting as long as eight months—based on the national average for people over 40 years old— older long-term unemployed workers risk losing their health insurance, their homes, and their savings. CTC clients face a number of unique challenges: • 80% are 40 to 70 years of age and face age discrimination and difficulty using new technologies for job searches • 55% live at or below 250% of the federal poverty level, despite having a good education and a solid work history. • 50% are people of color and face discrimination and pay disparities based on race. • 25% have a disclosed disability, such as macular degeneration, hearing loss, or Asperger Syndrome. • Many clients struggle with depression and hopelessness. • Clients are out of work an average of 13 months before they come to CTC.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Job Search/Career Management

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of public events held to further mission

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

CTC provides workshops at universities, libraries, churches as part of our community outreach strategy. These events serve a total of 500 in an average year.

Number of volunteers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

CTC has 50 volunteer career coaches and program facilitators. The average volunteer has been retained for seven years.

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

CTC has been serving an average of 300 client each year for the last three years.

Number of hours of coaching

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

CTC provides its clients with access to weekly individual coaching sessions to provide strategic career management advice and to provide emotional support.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Goals for 2019-20 The board approved a three-year strategic plan that includes both a strategic vision for the evolution of services and a plan to sustain CTC operations during a time when it is under pressure to serve large numbers of clients experiencing much longer job searches. The following are highlights from CTC's strategic plan. • Provide 200 programs each year on job search topics, as well as peer support groups. • Serve 300 clients as well as 500 members of the community people through outreach programs. • Sixty percent of clients will find employment (full-time; contract; start a business) within 12 months of joining CTC.

Programs and Services The overarching goal of CTC is to successfully facilitate the job searches of its clients through job coaching, training, support, and fellowship. Our team of 40 career coaches volunteer their time. In addition to one-on-one coaching, clients can take advantage of Strong Vocational Interest and MBTI assessments, and workshops on resume writing, interviewing, networking, compensation negotiation and emotional resilience during an extended job search. CTC offers over 200 programs each year for its clients, sponsoring organizations, and members of the public. CTC also provides a business center with 10 workstations with computers and phones for conducting job search activities. CTC now offers Virtual Services, which combines an online career management system, Optimal Resume—that allows clients to create resumes and other communication tools, store portfolios, engage in mock video interviews from home, as well as to create their own personal website—with phone coaching to clients outside the Chicago Metro Area and the out of state alumni of sponsors such as Elmhurst College and Loyola University. This is a structured 12 week program, as compared to the self directed nature of in-person services at CTC. As a result of OSP's North Lawndale Kinship Initiative, CTC has formed a partnership with North Lawndale College Prep High School (NLCP) to provide career/job coaching, programs and resources, including two professional assessments and interpretation, for NLCP alumni who have graduated from college to assist them in developing career management skills and securing employment. CTC also partners with Arrupe College and I Have a Dream North Chicago to provide career services to first generation college graduates.

With a budget of $365,000, CTC serves over 300 clients and outreaches via community workshops to serve another 500 plus people. CTC is governed by a volunteer board of 10 members and has a staff of four. Over 40 volunteers help sustain CTC's mission. These professional volunteers serve as board members, job coaches, motivational and informational speakers, computer technicians and development experts.

• Provide 200 programs each year on job search topics, as well as peer support groups.
• Serve 400 clients as well as 400 members of the community people through outreach programs.
• Sixty percent of clients will find employment (full-time; contract; start a business) within 12 months of joining CTC.

Served 300 clients. Retained over 40 volunteers for an average of 7 years Offer Virtual Services. Served 50 first generation in college and recent college graduates with career services over the last year.

External Reviews

Financials

CAREER TRANSITIONS CENTER OF CHICAGO

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/16/2019

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 08/16/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
done
We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
done
We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
done
We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
done
We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Policies and processes

done
We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
done
We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.