DELTA INSTITUTE

Thriving Communities, Thriving Landscapes

Chicago, IL   |  https://delta-institute.org

Mission

Delta Institute works with communities throughout the Midwest to solve complex environmental challenges. We envision a region in which all communities and landscapes thrive through an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social challenges. Delta Institute’s two primary drivers to enact environmental and economic change in our home region are centered on Thriving Communities and Landscapes. Delta Institute exists because environmental and economic issues hit communities—both urban and rural—through disinvestment, inequity, and policy decisions. We collaborate to solve legacy environmental and economic issues at the community level by focusing on the self-defined goals our partners share with us.

Notes from the nonprofit

Delta Institute exists because environmental and economic issues hit communities—both urban and rural—through disinvestment, inequity, and policy decisions. We collaborate to solve legacy environmental and economic issues at the community level by focusing on the self-defined goals our partners share with us. It’s quite likely that you—or someone you know—live, work, or pass through a community that Delta has helped since our founding in 1998. Taking action now is not only a pressing climate change issue, but also an issue of equity and environmental justice. Join us today.

Ruling year info

1998

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. William (Bill) H. Schleizer

Main address

35 E Upper Wacker Dr Suite 1760

Chicago, IL 60601 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-4210191

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Environmental and economic issues hit communities—including rural areas—through disinvestment, inequity, and policy decisions. Disproportionate consequences have been borne by communities that have not historically had a voice, capacity, or resources to change or challenge the environmental and economic problems they face—and that have likely been imposed upon them. Further, communities throughout the Midwest are dealing with vacancy and environmental stressors from displaced and departed industry, which limit investment and degrade environmental and economic health as well as quality of life. Many EJ communities throughout the Midwest are resource constrained, which limits access to support planning for economic, social, and environmental change. Delta Institute was founded to support and collaborate with communities to improve their environment, increase economic opportunity, and rebuild neighborhood vitality to promote the health and wellbeing of residents.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

RESILIENT COMMUNITIES

Communities throughout the Midwest are dealing with vacancy and environmental stressors, which limit investment and degrade environmental and economic health as well as quality of life. For example, the federal government estimates that over 450,000 vacant, polluted properties—also called brownfields—exist throughout the U.S. The variety of pollutants in these properties range from arsenic, to heavy metals such as lead, to contaminants that can be breathed in—such as xylene. These contaminants have been consistently linked and correlated to public health risks such as cancer and systemic health problems such as blood disorders and developmental delays in children. Brownfield pollutants can also travel through the soil to damage the environment by polluting nearby water bodies and drinking wells. Brownfields often do not generate property tax revenue for needed city services (such as police and fire,) create blight and disinvestment, and attract crime compromising the well-being and safety of residents.

As the US’s primary energy source shifts from coal to natural gas and renewable energy, another source of stress in communities throughout the Midwest and the country is from the closing of coal plants. Since 2002, 74 coal-fired units have retired in the Midwest. As of October 2018, there were 65 coal plants operating in the Midwest in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin; nine of these plants are scheduled to close by 2025. Delta has witnessed the various economic and social impacts that coal plant closings can have on communities firsthand. Some communities face a significant loss in their tax base, while others are working to plan for what comes next on the large, contaminated parcel of land left behind, ensuring that the next use does not reinforce negative environmental impacts. Since releasing our Coal Plant Redevelopment Roadmap, four communities have reached out to us to discuss their plants’ impacts on their communities or to request Delta’s assistance in planning for what’s next.

Delta works with communities to remediate vacant, polluted lands through phytoremediation to then spur more sustainable redevelopment. A key component of our brownfields work involves Delta equipping communities with the tools they need as they redevelop closed—or closing—coal power plants. The goal of Delta Institute’s Resilient Communities Initiative is to use our technical, planning, and engagement expertise to enable communities to tackle legacy environmental challenges such as brownfield redevelopment, vacant land, coal community transition, and poor air quality.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Buildings use 30% of the energy consumed in the U.S. each year. Buildings that are “green”—which we define as incorporating sustainability features such as energy efficiency efforts—provide reduced overhead costs for owners/operators while engaging new tenants through “green” marketing efforts.

Delta became involved in Green Building consulting because we felt strongly that our range of core competencies would benefit such an integrated sustainability process. Our experience with brownfields, green purchasing, waste minimization, indoor air quality, training, sustainability financing, carbon offsetting, environmental impact assessments, energy efficiency. Delta believe that education and training are an integral piece to successful implementation and wide adoption of green building practices at both the owner and tenant levels, and thus are a core component of our sustainable building efforts.

Over the last 20 years of energy program outreach and engagement, we have built strong relationships with diverse stakeholders. These include private building owners; realty companies; utility partners like ComEd, with whom we partnered on Lumin, the Weatherization Program and the Chicago Green Office Challenge; community-based organizations, like Faith in Place, Enterprise Community Partners, and Chicago Historic Bungalow Association, Revere Cares and the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization among others. Government partners, including the City of Chicago, Cook County, State of Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity, the City of Madison, WI, the City of Racine, WI, and the City of Wyandotte, MI as examples.

Currently Delta Institute is working with the Illinois EEPS Strategic Advisory Group, NextGrid project leaders, ComEd, Ameren, Nicor, and Peoples Gas/North Shore staff, community stakeholders, Attorney General’s office and respective State agencies to begin this fact-finding process. Our previous work in this regard has included founding the Chicagoland Weatherization Working Group and Chicago Green Collar Jobs Coalition to organize around common energy and low-income barriers including job training and common program administration.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Soil is the underlying resource for agricultural working lands. We tend to think that soil is a renewable resource, but in fact our behavior has resulted in depletions at rates that exceed replenishment. It can take over 500 years to replace an inch of topsoil that is lost to erosion. Soil is not only the foundation for agricultural lands but also the origin for unique habitats found in the Midwest.
Emerging from the corners of the agricultural landscape, farmers recently have begun to use a suite of agricultural practices that rebuild or regenerate the soil. According to the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service, principles that improve soil health include:
• Keeping the soil covered by using cover crops,
• Minimizing soil disturbance,
• Increasing plant diversity,
• Keeping a living root in the ground, and,
• Integrating livestock through well-managed grazing (as—in moderation—manure replaces lost nutrients and grazing allows for renewed native plant growth).

The benefits of embracing regenerative agriculture range from local to global. Improving soil health through the adoption of regenerative agricultural practices positively impacts our environment by:
• Sequestering carbon and addressing climate change: According to the 4p1000 Initiative, increasing soil carbon by 0.4% per year could offset the global annual emissions of greenhouse gases.
• Increasing infiltration and reducing run-off: For every one percent increase in soil organic matter, soils can store an additional 25,000 gallons of water per acre—thus reducing impacts of flooding, nutrient pollution, and eutrophication.
• Cycling nutrients more efficiently: A more diverse and active biology in the soil helps plants access and use the nutrients they need to grow.
• Improving profitability for the farmer: Less input costs and more resilience to extreme events means more profitable farms. The Organic Hotspots analysis showed increases in median household income by over $2,000.
• Yielding healthy food that yields healthy people: Over the past 50 years, the nutrient density of major crops has declined dramatically. Improving the quality and care of our soils can help to increase food nutrient density and improve health outcomes.

The goal of Delta Institute’s Regenerative Food Systems Initiative is to expand sustainable and regenerative food production methods throughout the Midwest.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers

As cities and regions move further into the 21st century, issues around flooding and stormwater management will only become more prevalent. Particularly through the Great Lakes and the Midwest, many communities are dealing with the combination of dated and deteriorating infrastructure, as well as more frequent flooding events. This combination poses threats to water quality, public health, quality of life, economic opportunity, and community stability. The state of the problem is as critical in rural areas as it is in urban areas. Stormwater runoff from agricultural fields carries fertilizer into rural rivers and irrigation channels and erodes the stability of river banks, all of which result in an excess of pollution and sediment ending up in rivers and lakes, which can threaten water quality for upstream communities.

For Midwestern communities to viably address their rising stormwater and flooding concerns, an integrated approach is needed. Replacing our current “gray infrastructure” with “bigger pipes” is not a viable solution, due to its scale of cost, implementation, and the reality of stagnating public revenues to fund improvements. Integrating “gray infrastructure” with “green infrastructure,” planned systems that mimic natural water retention and infiltration processes, will help communities address the emerging stormwater management crisis in a more cost effective manner, while also serving to advance community beautification, as well as protecting and increasing access to open space. GI techniques can range from stormwater planters on roadways to native gardens and green roofs on properties.

The goal of Delta Institute’s GI efforts is to use our technical, planning, and engagement expertise to enable communities to overcome barriers to widespread use of GI throughout the Midwest, and local changemakers are empowered to implement GI infrastructure, reduce economic risks and costs to communities from improper stormwater management, and improve environmental quality and quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Delta is leading efforts for recycling, reuse, and salvage—while creating economic development, new jobs, and diverting tons of materials from landfill.

For Delta Institute, waste reduction is cornerstone to our mission and has been a core programmatic scope since our founding. Delta Institute has expertise in multiple waste and materials types including: municipal solid waste; construction and demolition waste; household hazardous waste including electronics; biomass; and wastewater. Delta serves local governments such as counties and cities, and works with businesses, industries, and institutions to reduce waste and, where possible, transform environmental liabilities to economic assets. Additionally, Delta Institute has worked with numerous facilities to improve waste management and help clients achieve LEED Ratings at landmark Chicago facilities such as the Merchandise Mart, Field Museum, and Prudential Plaza—which are complex ecosystems within themselves.

In 2009, Delta founded the Rebuilding Exchange, a nonprofit social enterprise with a mission of creating a market for reclaimed building materials. We work to divert waste by educating people on how deconstruction offers several environmental, economic, and community benefits for communities with high vacancy rates and unemployment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Across the Midwest, natural and working landscapes play a critical role in protecting soil and water resources, but stewardship of these lands is under-resourced, inconsistent, and unsustainable. There are insufficient resources to effectively steward our lands, and the costs will only increase as ecosystems are stressed by risks associated with climate change. Farmers see themselves as stewards of the land, but are operating within a system that rewards intensive production of commodity crops. In the Midwest, approximately 127 million acres are used for row crop agriculture (75% in corn and soybeans, 25% other). Ongoing changes in climate have substantial impacts on the $76 billion agricultural sector in the Midwest. We need to shift the system in a way that allows for investments in long term strategies that improve soils and treat the land as a natural resource.

Natural land practitioners understand the importance of natural and outdoor areas and the benefit that these resources provide, however they currently lack the resources needed to own, protect, and steward natural habitats to achieve landscape-scale environmental impact. While conservation organizations, protecting over 1 million acres of land, have been resilient and creative with their approaches to stewardship, additional reliable mechanisms are needed to meet the growing needs of these organizations in the future. Historically, natural land practitioners and farmers have viewed land management differently. However, they share many of the same goals when it comes to stewarding the land and protecting natural resources for future generations. With Delta’s knowledge and experience in convening diverse stakeholders, designing and implementing model programs along with informing better policy, we are well positioned to lead and support work informed and championed by farmers, land trusts, and other organizations that steward the land.

The goal of Delta Institute’s Land Stewardship Initiative is to build the capacity of landowners, public agencies, and agencies to plan for more sustainable and long-term land management.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of communities partnered with.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

RESILIENT COMMUNITIES

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Delta exists because environmental and economic issues hit communities—both urban and rural—through disinvestment, inequity, and policy decisions. We implement projects throughout the entire Midwest.

Reducing flooding risk through green infrastructure, increasing stormwater gallon capacity.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Delta works with communities throughout the Midwest to plan and implement green infrastructure projects and designs into their stormwater management strategy, reducing flooding and polluted runoff.

Number of trees planted to decrease flooding and pollutants, beautify neighborhoods, and expand canopy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Delta operates multiple green infrastructure and forest canopy projects (currently/recently in Indiana and Michigan) to improve local ecosystems, expand canopy coverage, and reduce stormwater runoff.

Number of acres of farmland that implement at least one new conservation practice.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers

Related Program

LAND STEWARDSHIP

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Delta works with landowners throughout Illinois (and the broader Midwest) to implement conservation practices that regenerate the soil, reduce negative impacts, and offer new revenue options.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Delta Institute envisions a region in which all communities and landscapes thrive through an integrated approach to environmental, economic, and social challenges. Delta has supported land use, market analysis, community inclusion, and resilience planning efforts in nearly all of the 100+ communities we worked with in 2018 and 2019.

Delta Institute’s six Initiatives proactively addressing environmental and economic challenges are:
1. Through our Regenerative Food Systems efforts, Delta is cultivating a marketplace for healthier, better tasting, and sustainable food products. Our agricultural ecosystems will thrive only with a more diverse rotation of crops and livestock. While there are potentially many different species that will grow in our region, we lack markets, infrastructure, and knowledge that are needed to enable sectoral growth and landscape regeneration. Varieties of wheat, rye, oats, barley, dry beans, and more species were once commonplace in the region, but have been pushed aside as corn and soybeans have dominated the landscape. In order to reintroduce this diversity, we first need to create demand in the marketplace. We are working across the agricultural value chain to characterize how new infrastructure could help to link farmers and the diverse rotations of crops they grow to population centers.
2. The Midwestern economy is driven by agriculture, and our Land Stewardship services help farmers preserve their greatest resource: their land. Delta Institute will develop a suite of policies and programs that incentivize long-term investment in conservation practices based on land ownership attributes. We are creating tools to assist land trusts in taking advantage of existing programs to maximize stewardship activities along with developing a policy action plan to gain access to other programs and funding systems not currently available to practitioners.
3. Our Resilient Communities work ranges from monitoring air quality in Chicago neighborhoods to cleaning up contaminated land in numerous towns. Delta works with communities to remediate vacant, polluted lands through phytoremediation to then spur more sustainable redevelopment. A key component of our brownfields work involves Delta equipping communities with the tools they need as they redevelop closed—or closing—coal power plants.
4. Waste Reduction is leading efforts for recycling, reuse, and salvage—while creating economic development, new jobs, and diverting tons of materials from landfill.
5. Delta’s Sustainable Buildings work helps preserve our landmark buildings making them more efficient and vibrant places to work and visit.
6. Through Green Infrastructure Delta is advancing proactive stormwater management. In our deliberate project work, Delta is advancing proactive stormwater management through green design (such as permeable pavement, bioswales, and stormwater tree planting).

All Delta projects hinge completely on intentional, respectful, and authentic inclusion of our community partners. In 2018 we worked with more than 300 partners in communities throughout the Midwest, ranging from small rural towns in Iowa, Michigan, and southern Illinois with only a few thousand residents each, to large regions within Chicagoland and counties with millions of residents—creating equitable and economically feasible solutions to environmental challenges that each community faces. Delta’s partner communities retain the economic, environmental, and social benefits from our collaboration, and the tools and resources that are co-created are used by local change-makers and adapted and spread for wider impact. It is through this open and transparent approach--without any “ownership” of final resources--that communities may move progress toward their self-defined and described goals.

Investing in partnerships and relationship building is critical. Through our work in the community engagement facilitation we did for the closed Shenango Coke Plant site outside of Pittsburgh, PA, we helped facilitate the creation of Guiding Principles with local citizens, environmental groups, economic development agencies, and municipalities. We learned that including all voices--even from opposite sides of the issue--is essential, and that clearly communicating with all sides in a transparent, consistent, respectful, and inclusive approach is bedrock for any possibility of project success.

Delta has demonstrated its expertise in environmentally sustainable development and has earned a reputation as an impact-oriented, innovative, and collaborative partner for government, business, and community organizations throughout the Midwest. Delta staff have demonstrated expertise around community planning, project management, facilitation, land use planning, brownfield redevelopment and ports related economic development. Delta has led several successful community planning projects in which we lend capacity to municipalities, community groups and other stakeholders seeking to transform underutilized land into assets that confer benefits to the existing residents and businesses. Delta has been the “backbone organization” in large collaborative and collective impact efforts that require strong internal management and financial reporting infrastructure.

Delta Institute has more than 20 years of experience developing innovative models to support working lands conservation, and in recent years, Delta has explored how similar approaches might provide long-term, sustainable change in our regional (with national implications) food chain. This work has resulted in broad partnerships, improved decision support systems, and funding mechanisms. Delta manages grant-supported work within the parameters outlined in our Quality and Environment Management System (QEMS), which provides a framework for management of documents, communications, and finances, enabling Delta to complete projects on time and within grant parameters. Delta Institute also has the financial management systems in place to comply with federal and private foundation grant requirements. Over the last 5 years, Delta has invested in state-of-the-art project management and financial tools to ensure transparency and accountability for organizational operations.

Delta has successfully implemented complex, six- and seven-figure multi-stakeholder projects on a regional scale:

Resilient Communities: Delta is an EPA Technical Assistance to Brownfields service provider and in six years has served over forty communities in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana and other states with brownfield redevelopment planning; land re-use visioning; application of sustainable redevelopment strategies; prioritization and analysis of land inventories; Phase I and Phase II environmental site assessments; brownfield cleanup strategies; translation of technical documents into future effort and costs; identification of redevelopment funding sources; and community education, engagement and input. Within Chicago, in partnership with the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), we collaborated to create brownfield strategies for the redevelopment of 10 properties. LVEJO and Delta are Finalists for the inaugural $10M Chicago Prize.

Regenerative Food: Through substantial partnership arrangement with the Wallace Center at Winrock International and their Pasture Project initiative, Delta's Regenerative Food Systems work is seeking to scale the grass-fed beef and dairy sector throughout Illinois through a regenerative lens. Four years ago, Delta Institute helped launch the Artisan Grain Collaborative (AGC), a group of diverse collaborators that are working to build demand for small-batch artisan grains in Chicago and the Midwest.

Green Infrastructure: Delta has partnered with Hobart and Michigan City, Indiana to implement GI installations throughout the cities as part of our Green Infrastructure initiative. Delta assisted with grant and contractor procurement and project management. The four installations collectively will provide an additional 800,000 gallons of stormwater management capacity, which minimizes flooding risks and prevents pollutants from entering Lake Michigan.

Waste Reduction: Delta has successfully implemented many waste reduction and deconstruction projects to build the capacity of our municipal, county, regional, and corporate partners to manage their waste better and more effectively. This includes several reports and resources, including a market analysis for the City of St. Louis on demolition and deconstruction opportunities, and a municipal waste resource kit to decrease the disposal rate of reusable materials.

Watershed Management: Over the past year, as part of our Land Stewardship efforts, Delta has worked with farmers near Allegan, Michigan to implement conservation practices on over 800 acres, reducing 137 tons of sediment and 535 pounds of phosphorus from entering the Kalamazoo River. Additionally, over 100 practitioners, including farmers, land trusts, NGOs, and local/state/federal government agencies use the tools and models developed by Delta to improve environmental outcomes throughout the Midwest.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Delta facilitated a coalition of community groups to create Guiding Principles for sustainable redevelopment of the closed Shenango Coke Plant site located on the Ohio River outside of Pittsburgh, PA to ensure environmental injustice issues were addressed while also providing a clear path forward for tax revenue, job creation, and forward-looking industry that is clean and green. Recommendations were based on market analysis, with an emphasis on generating tax revenue and adding jobs to the local economy while minimizing or eliminating any potential negative environmental impacts. We collected extensive community feedback and engagement to inform and create the final project deliverables, which may be viewed here: https://delta-institute.org/publication/shenango-reimagined/

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

DELTA INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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DELTA INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 6/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Sam Schiller

Carbon Yield

Term: 2020 - 2022

Allison Hannon Holly

Jon Cheffings

Sam Schiller

Ann McCabe

Jeff Fort

Sanjiv Sinha

Tammi Davis

Kevin Kalus

Niharika Hanglem

David Freed

Julie Rizzo

Vanessa Roanhorse

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/05/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.