AFRICA BRIDGE

Creating sustainable improvement in vulnerable children's lives

aka AB   |   Marylhurst, OR   |  www.africabridge.org

Mission

Africa Bridge empowers Tanzanian communities to protect, support, and care for vulnerable children by helping villages implement sustainable social service and economic solutions.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Ms. Sharon Brabenac

Main address

PO Box 115

Marylhurst, OR 97036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-4381474

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

Leadership Development (W70)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The following four strategic objectives enable Africa Bridge to achieve our mission and help ensure the sustainability of that after our 5 -year engagement is completed in Tanzania. Enable all Most Vulnerable Children that desire education to go to school. Improve food security and housing of Most Vulnerable Children. Expand economic productivity of Most Vulnerable Children caregivers and other community members. Support expanded social cohesion within targeted villages and wards.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Engagement

Africa Bridge commits to five-year partnerships with local communities. The process begins with community engagement, during which village leaders and influential local government officials pledge to work in partnership with Africa Bridge. Engagement continues with in-depth meetings with villagers.

First Africa Bridge meets with the children only, during a three-day, in-depth guided session called Future Search. In this safe, supportive environment, children have the opportunity to share their experiences, hopes and dreams. They speak from the heart, and have intuitive understanding of their own and their families’ needs and aspirations.

Following Future Search, adult stakeholders come together in another three-day meeting to make village development plans, driven by the children’s ideas and agendas. Core components generally include an intensive two- to three-year period of assisting villages in caring for children, investing seed-capital for agricultural enterprise, and providing intensive training in a range of capacity-building skills.

In the last stage of Africa Bridge’s support cycle, lasting about two years, Africa Bridge reinforces the villages in their growing strength and independence. After five years, we exit in order to bring resources to other needy communities nearby. At that point, the institutions created and programs implemented are strong enough to be sustainable.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Core to Africa Bridge’s model is the establishment of a voluntary village committee, known as the Most Vulnerable Children Committee, which takes on responsibility for identifying and aiding vulnerable children and their families.

MVC Committees help address children’s barriers to school attendance, offer assistance in getting birth certificates and other legal protection, provide short-term food and shelter aid, offer care-giving and life-skills training provide recreational and social support to vulnerable children through Kids’ Clubs, and other similar activities.

MVC Committees also educate all villagers on topics such as health and nutrition, AIDS prevention, and legal protections. Additionally, committees nominate guardians to become members of new village agricultural cooperatives. The commitment and energies of devoted volunteers operate these committees independently and permanently, after start-up assistance from Africa Bridge.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

In addition to establishing Most Vulnerable Children Committees, Africa Bridge provides a pathway to economic independence for caretakers of vulnerable children. This is done by establishing crop and livestock co-ops, providing start-up loans to co-op members, and offering intensive training.

Repayments of co-op loans from villagers go back into the co-ops, so they can expand their memberships to other impoverished families caring for vulnerable children. In addition to becoming the key to economic security for families, these co-ops are expected to divert some of their profits to provide a long-term source of support for the MVC Committees. In these ways, the MVC Committees and co-ops are interdependent and reinforcing.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Integrated, sustainable development requires comprehensive, holistic solutions. For most communities, access to healthcare and education is just as important as economic opportunity, social and legal support.

In addition to working with the Tanzanian government to build dispensaries and housing for medical professionals, Africa Bridge works with local villagers and school officials to build and renovate classrooms. The more kids who receive the support and resources necessary to attend school, the more crowded classrooms become. A solution was needed.

This Is My School was created by students and connects vulnerable schools in Tanzania with schools in the United States. Over the course of several years, these sister schools interact in a meaningful way to generate resources for schools supplies, desks, chairs and classroom improvements.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Families

Children's clubs are where children play, talk, learn and grow together. They have general knowledge question and answer sessions and risk behavior session for increasing awareness .

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Children and youth

To empower participants - village leaders, Ward Development committee members, Children Representatives, Empowerment Workers and Most Vulnerable Children Committee Members. Topics: children's rights and how to protect them, to understand issues around violence and inheritance laws and implications.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth receiving HIV prevention services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Children's Clubs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Agriculture and Livestock Co-operatives

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Coop members increase food security. Families go from having one meal per day to three meals per day.

Number of farmer members of the Coop or suppliers of the SME/Enterprise that are producing crops/products and selling them to the SMEs/Coop/Enterprise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Agriculture and Livestock Co-operatives

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is the number of coops in the villages.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships

Related Program

Community Engagement

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To ensure that the families in Tanzania are able to provide food and safety to the most vulnerable children.
2. Enhance organizational strength based on a solid foundation of staff, board, governance and operational structures, systems procedures and policies.
3. Prove and improve the impact of our program model and outcomes.
4. Create long-term financial sustainability.

1. Financial Management - conduct consistent annual financial audits in the US and Tanzania. Conduct an annual review of financial controls and update as appropriate.
2. Conduct a program review to include all systems, processes and documentation in the US and Tanzania. Continue to rebuild programming capacity by hiring, training and retaining quality staff and outsourcing for selected disciplines. Develop, document and test pilot process to support the introduction of new income generating activities to the program.
3. Expand AB's program leadership and development presence in Tanzania by building a network of NGO's, government officials with the support of the TZ Program Advisory Board. Refocus the Board of Directors' orientation to strategic oversight including donor networking/fundraising. Recruit board members to diversify areas of expertise and increase connections to donors/capital.
4. Implement a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation methodology that demonstrates and documents program progress and outcomes required by funders, attractive to donors and supportive of continuous program improvement. Develop criteria and document the process that will be used for expansion into new wards, districts or countries. Proactively seek and evaluate partnerships that may enhance the model and support scalability.
5. Develop and implement organizational fundraising plans that meet the operational budget requirements.
6. Define the policy for building an operational reserve fund.

We have the staff in the US and in TZ to create and execute planning and implement actions. We have a strong Finance Committee and Operations Committee with both staff, Board and volunteers on each committee. We have a Tanzania Program Advisory Board. We continue to learn from our funders. For example utilizing Catchafire that the Segal Family Foundation provides us is very useful information to remain current in organizational and funding topics.

We are excited to announce that the Kisondela Ward is on target to graduate this coming March 2021. And, we are doing well with a pilot project for dairy cows in the Kambasegela Ward. We are also pleased with the success of our COVID-19 prevention work in each of the nine villages that we are serving in right now.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are conducting a pilot project process with dairy cows in one village that changes the entrance and experience of becoming a coop member.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

AFRICA BRIDGE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AFRICA BRIDGE

Board of directors
as of 8/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ben Pettigrew

Robert (Barry) Childs

Africa Bridge

Susan Stewart

Ben Pettigrew

Laurie Cooper

Susan Bloch

James Lindsay

Don Schmidt

Amy Adams

Ali Hasson

Nicolette Chen

Brenna King

Baraka Mtunga

Mathayo Mwakagamba

Joseph Asare

Jeremy Powell

Sireesha Kumar

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.