PLATINUM2022

Rock The Street, Wall Street

Moving Girls Forward In the Field of Finance

Nashville, TN   |  www.rockthestreetwallstreet.com

Mission

Rock The Street, Wall Street is a financial and investment literacy program designed to bring both gender and racial equity to the financial markets and spark the interest of high school girls into careers of finance.

Ruling year info

2013

CEO/Founder

Ms. Maura K Cunningham

Main address

3523 Trimble Road

Nashville, TN 37215 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-4746332

NTEE code info

Secondary/High School (B25)

Secondary/High School (B25)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Culture and Getting Beyond FinLit Basics In the U.S., we lose girls in math as early as age nine. We don’t have this problem in Russia, China nor Eastern European countries. This is a cultural issue, not a capability issue. RTSWS gets girls re-engaged with math at a critical age, when they are on the verge of becoming financially independent; choosing whether or not to go to college; what college they will choose and which majors/minors they will study. Our sets of curriculum offer deep dives into college cost calculations, loan credit reports, and debt and credit management. In addition to basic financial literacy subjects, we introduce financial planning and investment literacy as well. Our students need to know these critical life skills to navigate a financially independent life. Financial and investment literacy is the great equalizer.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rock the Street, Wall Street Classroom Workshops

RTSWS is a Project Based Learning (PBL), academic year-long program offered to girls, grades 9-12, who self-select into the program.
Financial & Investment Literacy Workshops (Fall): Once a week, for 5 consecutive weeks, similar to a before or after school extracurricular, the one-hour classroom workshops utilize hands-on projects to cover financial and investment literacy knowledge. Volunteer female financial professionals use our cutting-edge curriculum to guide and empower students to operate as financial advisors to a variety of fictitious clients, dive into investment portfolios, and launch into foundational stock market understanding. Tackling both of the reasons girls are not choosing STEM professions - that they need to see women in the profession and see their female peers choosing the profession. With 3 sets of curriculum, and none being a prerequisite for the other, the program can be sustained in a single high school for 3 years without repeating content.

Population(s) Served

We are changing the student to guidance counselor ratio from a national average of 482:1 to 2:1. During our 5 -1 hour sessions, students are matched at a 2:1 ratio, 2 students to 1 mentor forming potential life-long relationships and invaluable social capital providing a gateway into the industry. Students and mentors engage in college and career readiness discussions, roleplaying of interviewer/interviewee, college selection, resume preparation, career choices including those on our Internship/Job Portal, and do skills assessments. If old enough, mentors help students create a LinkedIn profile and discuss social media etiquette and networking. The 2:1 ratio is important as most students don’t receive direct guidance from an adult during these formative years.

Population(s) Served

The half-day field trip is a capstone event providing students an opportunity to visit a Local institution gaining a rare view into these professional settings. The girls, most of which if not all have never been in a professional environment and often having their first glimpse into the world of finance, tour departments learning of business functions and hear from female financial professionals of differing seniority to expand their insight into career possibilities. As Pelly Papoutsis (Math teacher/coordinator of student affairs at NYC Department of Education) and Yvonne Melnitsky (Business Teacher at NYC Department of Education ) shared with us how our program is life altering and a “once in a lifetime experience” for their students.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Women and girls

RTSWS is connecting its students to our partner organizations to high school & college internships and job opportunities. Launched in 2021 it is one of our most highly visited web pages as students & partner organizations come to either post a job opportunity or search for employment opportunities that the students can apply to.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Women and girls

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage increase of students understanding of basic financial literacy concepts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents

Related Program

Wall Street Experience Field Trips

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of students who after completing program indicate they are extremely likely or very likely to pursue a career in Finance, Economics or Business

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents

Related Program

Wall Street Experience Field Trips

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To provide services to high school girls across the country, increasing our reach by 1-2 cities per academic year.

2. To see an average gain of of at least 50% from pre-test results versus post test results among students who participate in RTSWS workshops.

3. At least 50% of students will state they are either very likely or extremely likely to explore a major in Business, Finance, or Economics.

4. Increase financial and investment literacy among high school students.

5. Improve the understanding of the financial responsibilities of college life and life in the workplace.

6. Help our students understand the long term benefits of saving and investing early in their life and review college lending habits.

RTSWS is facilitated 100% by female financial professionals and has four components:
Financial & Investment Literacy Workshops (Fall): Once a week, for 5 consecutive weeks, similar to a before or after school extracurricular, the one-hour classroom workshops utilize hands-on projects to cover financial and investment literacy knowledge. Volunteer female financial professionals use our cutting-edge curriculum to guide and empower students to operate as financial advisors to a variety of fictitious clients, dive into investment portfolios, and launch into foundational stock market understanding. Tackling both of the reasons girls are not choosing STEM professions - that they need to see women in the profession and see their female peers choosing the profession. With 3 sets of curriculum, and none being a prerequisite for the other, the program can be sustained in a single high school for 3 years without repeating content.
Wall Street Experience Field Trip (Fall): The half-day field trip is a capstone event providing students an opportunity to visit a Local institution gaining a rare view into these professional settings. The girls, most of which if not all have never been in a professional environment and often having their first glimpse into the world of finance, tour departments learning of business functions and hear from female financial professionals of differing seniority to expand their insight into career possibilities. As Pelly Papoutsis (Math teacher/coordinator of student affairs at NYC Department of Education) and Yvonne Melnitsky (Business Teacher at NYC Department of Education ) shared with us how our program is life altering and a “once in a lifetime experience” for their students.
Mentorship (Spring): We are changing the student to guidance counselor ratio from a national average of 482:1 to 2:1. During our 5 -1 hour sessions, students are matched at a 2:1 ratio, 2 students to 1 mentor forming potential life-long relationships and invaluable social capital providing a gateway into the industry. Students and mentors engage in college and career readiness discussions, roleplaying of interviewer/interviewee, college selection, resume preparation, career choices including those on our Internship/Job Portal, and do skills assessments. If old enough, mentors help students create a LinkedIn profile and discuss social media etiquette and networking. The 2:1 ratio is important as most students don’t receive direct guidance from an adult during these formative years.
Internship & Job (IJ) Portal (Post RTSWS Program): RTSWS is connecting its students to our partner organizations to high school & college internships and job opportunities. Launched in 2021 it is one of our most highly visited web pages as students & partner organizations come to either post a job opportunity or search for employment opportunities that the students can apply to.

RTSWS has shown continual, progressive growth since our launch in 2013. Our launch began in one school in Nashville and we have grown to offering our programming in numerous cities across the US and have even expanded into Canada. More expansion is imminent. RTSWS has been funded to date from a number of private gifts, corporate grants and foundation grants from all across the country. The Executive Director, the growing Board of Directors and Advisory Board, are all working on a diversified fundraising plan which includes grants from corporate, private and public funders as well as fundraising events.

RTSWS has had tremendous success since its’ launch in 2013.

2016-
ED invited to The White House by The White House Council on Women and Girls to Conference on Inclusive STEM education.
Invited to ring market bell at NASDAQ, in recognition of our vision and impact on financial literacy and increasing diversity.
2017
Expanded into Dallas (sponsored by Fidelity Investments) & Charlotte (sponsored by LPL Financial and MFS).
Named by Ellevest as a resource for our “Future Female Leaders” alongside GoldieBlox, Girls Who Code and The Girls Scouts.

2018

RTSWS selected as TN nonprofit recipient of TN Senators Taste of the South Gala.
Expansion into 6 new cities: Los Angeles, Omaha, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Merrimack, Raleigh and Atlanta.

2019

Our founder was awarded the Betty Cook Award which is given annually to a woman who has dedicated herself to the advancement of women.

2020

In Jan 2020, RTSWS was featured in a segment of The Today Show as part of National Mentoring Month.

In March 2020, RTSWS was featured in Honda’s Community Partner spotlight. We’re thrilled to be included in this series highlighting the wonderful work Honda supports.

Our proposal “Equal Opportunity in Finlit and Finance” was to be featured at the SXSWEDU conference in March 2020. Unfortunately, it was postponed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Rock The Street, Wall Street
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rock The Street, Wall Street

Board of directors
as of 08/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Anders Hall

Maura Cunningham

Founder, RTSWS

Meredith Jones

Founder - MJ Alternative Investment Researcg

Anders Hall

Vanderbilt University

Reginald Sanders

WK Kellogg Foundation

Kate Burke

AllianceBerstein

Lisa Warren

Mediant

Matthew Stone

University of Chicago

Arthur Steinmetz

Oppenheimer Funds

Claire Fefer

DUMAC, Inc

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/09/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.