Leukemia Research Foundation, Inc.

Dedicated to Conquering ALL Blood Cancers

Northfield, IL   |  http://www.allbloodcancers.org

Mission

Our Mission: Dedicated to conquering all blood cancers by funding research into their causes and cures, and enriching the quality of life of those touched by these diseases.

Ruling year info

1954

Executive Director

Mr. Kevin Radelet

Board Chair

Blake Brandwein

Main address

191 Waukegan Road Ste 105

Northfield, IL 60093 USA

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EIN

36-6102182

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (H12)

Cancer (G30)

Cancer Research (H30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Blood cancers do not discriminate. They can happen to anyone, regardless of age, gender, or race - at anytime. More than 170,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with blood cancer each year (about 10% or all new cancer diagnosis'). There are currently more than 1.2 million living with, or in remission from blood cancer. Nearly 60,000 people die annually due to complications from a blood cancer diagnosis (about 10% of all cancer-related deaths). Funding research is the only way to discover the ultimate cure.

At the same time, supporting those with a blood cancer diagnosis is critical. The need for patient education is widely recognized in the medical community. Well-educated patients are better able to understand and manage their own health and medical care throughout their lives. The financial costs of cancer care are a tremendous burden to people diagnosed with cancer, their families, and society as a whole. The economic toll of cancer can be profound.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Financial Assistance

The Leukemia Research Foundation provides a need-based, financial assistance program that reimburses patients for out of pocket expenses associated with their blood cancer treatment including co-pays and prescriptions. Patients must be living within a 100 mile radius of Chicago and/or the entire state of Illinois.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses

To distinguish itself in the research community and provide support that is difficult to secure, the LRF funds New Investigator Research Grants exclusively on a worldwide basis. These one year grants are $100,000 each, an impressive amount that allows innovative scientists to act on their ideas, and try new procedures and experiments that will lead to significant breakthroughs. Research advances depend on these investigators of the future to bring fresh creative ideas and technologies to research problems and they pioneer new areas of investigation.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission (goals) of the Leukemia Research Foundation is straightforward and urgent: Dedicated to conquering all blood cancers by funding research into their causes and cures and enriching the quality of life of those touched by these diseases.

A world free of leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, and all other blood cancers. That was the dream of those who created the Leukemia Research Foundation (LRF) 74 years ago in 1946. And it steadfastly remains our aspiration today.

Our strategy to achieve these vitally important objectives is to fund worldwide medical research into the causes and cures of all blood cancers, provide patient financial assistance and offer educational/emotional support programs.

Based on recommendations from our prestigious Medical Advisory Board, the LRF provides research grants to scientists around the world. The LRF exclusively funds New Investigators - individuals who are beginning to establish their own laboratories and are no longer under the tutelage of a senior scientist mentor. These one year grants are $100,000 each, an impressive amount that allows innovative scientists to act on their ideas, and try new procedures and experiments that will lead to significant breakthroughs.

Over the years, the LRF has funded hundreds of research scientists and projects on five different continents with our exclusive focus on New Investigators. The success and effectiveness of their funded project is measured by various objectives including the furtherance of blood cancer research (ultimately working toward a cure) and to launch and support the research of scientists early in their career. Research advances depend on these investigators of the future to bring fresh ideas and technologies to research problems and they pioneer new areas of investigation. They are essential to the research field.

The LRF's Patient Financial Assistance Program is a need-based program that provides support to patients and families struggling under the financial burden of a blood cancer diagnosis. The Program alleviates expenses not covered by insurance that may include doctor visits and co-pays, hospital care, laboratory work, and prescription expenses among others.

The LRF conducts educational and support programs for patients, family members, caregivers and medical professionals. These conferences, including the Treatment Options for Blood Cancer Patients Conference, the Town Hall Meeting, and Town Hall Meeting in Spanish, and Road to A Cure are offered free of charge or registration. They provide opportunities for direct dialogue between patients and prominent hematology/oncology and transplant specialists to discuss treatment options and procedures.

Cancer is costly: physically, emotionally, and economically. Funding research to find a cure is the only permanent solution. The ability to translate science from laboratory research into effective therapies is vital. The rate of progress in cancer diagnosis, treatment and prevention must continue until the disease is conquered. Over seven decades, the LRF's capacity to provide these programs grew out of the dedication of countless volunteers committed to finding a cure. Today there are 22 active chapters that comprise the underpinning of the LRF. Within these chapters, hundreds of volunteers conduct a variety of fundraising events every year to raise funds to support our programs. Volunteer chapters are an integral part of the LRF's rich history. Not only do they celebrate survivorship, but they also celebrate and remember the loved ones lost to these diseases.

In addition to the important event-focused chapter work, the LRF relies on the support of everyday people from around the country who long to see the eradication of blood cancers. Financial support from individuals, corporations, foundations, and other giving entities are necessary to reach our goals and pursued through a variety of traditional philanthropic methods including direct mail, sponsorship, cause-marketing partnerships, grants, major gifts, employee giving, school fundraising and much more. Legions of non-chapter volunteer groups nationwide, who are intensely dedicated to the goals and purpose of the LRF, also join forces by conducting various large and small fundraising events in their local area. The LRF is not a United Way agency and does not receive any government grants, nor derive any benefits from a religious or political group association.

The LRF maintains a modest reserve account in case of emergency, but is committed to distributing annual charitable contributions for their donor intended use in the year in which they are received.

The Leukemia Research Foundation's leadership is made up of people who have coped with, firsthand, the death of a loved one, or have personally survived a blood cancer diagnosis themselves. As a result, LRF policy and governance is based upon personal experience as well as true compassion with the hope that in the future no one will experience what they, themselves have endured.

As noted above, the LRF has made noteworthy contributions to the field of blood cancer research helping to advance the momentum in identifying new treatments and progress toward the discovery of a cure. The LRF has funded more than 500 research projects on five different continents. In addition, thousands of patients have been directly supported through the LRF's need-based financial assistance program. Thousands more have become better informed about their diagnosis and treatment options through annual educational conferences featuring some of the finest doctors in the field.

To provide those urgent demands, the LRF has raised more than $80 million in service to our mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Leukemia Research Foundation serves New Investigator research scientists through our blood cancer research grant program and blood cancer patients, caregivers, and survivors through free educational and support programs. Patient education programs include in-person conferences (recorded and made available to all), virtual education programs, and online resources that would be beneficial to the blood cancer community. Support programs include peer support communities, mentoring and a Patient Grant Program, which provides financial assistance to patients who are struggling with the financial burden of a blood cancer diagnosis. Feedback is collected from program participants throughout the year.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After administering a patient survey and conducting individual interviews with social workers who refer patients, the Leukemia Research Foundation made changes to our Patient Financial Assistance Program. The program was converted from providing reimbursements for medical/pharmacy expenses to a grant program, which provides a lump-sum payment that can be used for any necessary expenses during treatment and disease management. Patients and social workers provided feedback that the reimbursement was cumbersome for patients and it did not cover needed expenses, such as transportation to treatment, lodging during a transplant, or basic needs expenses. After changing the program, we have received feedback that the new program is easy to use and much more helpful to patient participants.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    In the provided example of how the Leukemia Research Foundation made changes to the Patient Financial Assistance Program, the feedback we received from patient program participants taught us what patients need, what would be most helpful to them in their time of need, and what they experience as they are diagnosed and going through treatment. Their input shifted our expense category rules, making our program much more flexible and beneficial to patients.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Leukemia Research Foundation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Leukemia Research Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 9/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Blake Brandwein

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data