United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.

United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in Champaign County.

aka UWCC   |   Savoy, IL   |  www.unitedwaychampaign.org

Mission

United Way of Champaign County brings people and resources together to create positive change and lasting impact in our community.

Ruling year info

1971

President and CEO

Sue Grey

Main address

5 Dunlap Court

Savoy, IL 61874 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

37-0662519

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At United Way, we aim to create sustainable solutions to our community's most pressing social needs. In Champaign County, we fight to improve Education, Health and Financial Stability. These are the building blocks for a good quality of life. Our vision is to build a community where every person can thrive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Impact Fund

The Community Impact Fund provides grants to programs making a measurable impact on Edcuation, Income or Health in our county.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Emerging Community Leaders (ECL) is focused on teaching young professionals (generally 21-40 years old) how to Connect, Serve, and Lead in our community. We host an annual class-based program where participants learn about nonprofit organizations, how to serve on a board or as a high-level volunteer, how to be an effective volunteer fundraiser, and finally we connect young professionals with a volunteer opportunity that meets their personal and professional skills.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adults

School readiness has a major impact on success in school, work, and life. 45% of local kindergarteners were not prepared for the first day of school. United Way's Early Grade Level Success program is focused on building a strong educational foundation for all children in Champaign County.
Program Goals:
Increase the number of students demonstrating kindergarten readiness by 10%
Increase the number of low-income and Black male students meeting Math and English Language Arts standards by 10%
Decrease chronic absenteeism by 10%

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children
Economically disadvantaged people
Family relationships

Food. Water. Housing. Healthcare. Clothing. Identification. Access to technology. These are the critical things people need to thrive in our world today. With many of our community's households struggling to make ends meet, our community must have a strong safety net. Together we can prevent crisis, provide stability, and support those navigating a complex social service system.
Goals:
Help people meet their physical needs
Assist people with accessing and navigating complex human service systems

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Health

All children in Champaign County deserve to grow up in a supportive, loving home. This is critical if we wish for every child to achieve their full potential. The dual risks of child abuse and neglect and mental health issues threaten the well-being of children and can have significant negative long-term impacts.
GOALS:
Fewer children ages 0-5 will experience maltreatment
Children 0-18 in substitute care will not experience additional or repeated maltreatment
Parents & caregivers in zip codes 61821 and 61802 will have increased access to supports that reduce stress and the risk of child maltreatment
The community will have increased capacity to address the needs of children and adults who have experienced trauma
Children and adults who have experienced trauma will have increased support available

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Victims of crime and abuse
Out-of-home youth

United Way is committed to building a more equitable Champaign County. In 2021, United Way awarded $151,000 in grants to a cohort of local programs which address inequities in our community. Each grant program is working to advance one or more of the following areas:

Create Community Awareness
Encourage Collaboration
Create More Firsts
Break Down Barriers to Success

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
At-risk youth
Ex-offenders
Victims of crime and abuse

211 is an easy-to-remember, non-emergency telephone number provided by United Way that connects people with the help they need. 211 saves time and frustration through highly-trained specialists who match people to the right agency based on their individual needs. And now, 211 is available via text at 898 211.

The 24-hour, 365 days a year helpline makes it easy to navigate the maze of human service providers and helplines. All calls and texts are anonymous and confidential.

When you call or text 211, a real person will answer the phone. They can help you find local help for many things, including:

Food and shelter
Counseling and mental health services
Income and employment support
Help for the elderly and people with disabilities
Resources for children and families
Domestic Abuse
Veterans
Re-entry
Human Trafficking
Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation
Disaster Recovery

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Caregivers
Health

Where we work

Awards

4 Star Charity 2016

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Emerging Community Leaders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

COVID-19 impacted ability to volunteer

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Early Grade Level Success
Supporting our children so they may reach their full potential.
School readiness has a major impact on success in school, work, and life. 45% of local kindergarteners were not prepared for the first day of school. United Way's Early Grade Level Success program is focused on building a strong educational foundation for all children in Champaign County.
GOALS:
---Increase the number of students demonstrating kindergarten readiness by 10%
---Increase the number of low-income and Black male students meeting Math and English Language Arts standards by 10%
---Decrease chronic absenteeism by 10%

Child Well-Being
Preventing child maltreatment and building healthier families through mental health and trauma-responsive services.
All children in Champaign County deserve to grow up in a supportive, loving home. This is critical if we wish for every child to achieve their full potential. The dual risks of child abuse and neglect and mental health issues threaten the well-being of children and can have significant negative long-term impacts.
GOALS:
---Fewer children ages 0-5 will experience maltreatment
---Children 0-18 in substitute care will not experience additional or repeated maltreatment
---Parents & caregivers in zip codes 61821 and 61802 will have increased access to supports that reduce stress and the risk of child maltreatment
---The community will have increased capacity to address the needs of children and adults who have experienced trauma
---Children and adults who have experienced trauma will have increased support available

United for Equity
Building a stronger Champaign County nonprofit sector to serve all people.
Our United for Equity grant parnterships are creating change in the nonprofit sector by building community awareness, encouraging collaboration, creating more Firsts, and helping break down barriers to success.
GOALS:
---Create Community Awareness
---Encourage Collaboration
---Create More Firsts
---Break Down Barriers to Success

Community Essentials
Food. Water. Housing. Healthcare. Clothing. Identification. Access to technology. These are the critical things people need to thrive in our world today. With 45% of our households struggling to make ends meet, our community must have a strong safety net. United Way is committed to providing long-term support for community essentials. Together we can prevent crisis, provide stability, and support those navigating a complex social service system.
GOALS:
---Help people meet their physical needs
---Assist people with accessing and navigating complex human service systems

Our community faces complex challenges in healthcare, education, and employment.
These challenges don't have easy answers and have lasted months, years, and even generations.

To address our community’s most persistent and systemic problems, we must have an organized, proven strategy: we call it Community Impact.

Through Community Impact, we are re-imagining a more equitable and resilient community - one where more of our students are graduating prepared for success at college or on the job, more local families are financially stable, and more neighbors are living healthy lives. Our commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion is woven throughout this entire process - because every person deserves to thrive.

Our Three Part Plan
Community Change Grants
Highly targeted multi-year funding to programs and collaborations that are working alongside United Way to solve our community's most challenging problems in health, education, and financial stability. Together, we are fighting for solutions to longstanding issues and removing barriers that prevent our community from thriving.

Community Building Work
United Way brings nonprofits, businesses, government, and people together to innovate and find new solutions to community problems.

Community Essentials Grants
Food. Water. Housing. Healthcare. Clothing. Identification. Access to technology. These are the critical things people need to thrive in our world today. With 45% of our households struggling to make ends meet, our community must have a strong safety net. United Way is committed to providing long-term support for community essentials. Together we can prevent crisis, provide stability, and support those navigating a complex social service system.

We use a sophisticated tracking tool called EC Impact. All of our grant recipients enter their data into this program in order to create comprehensive, standardized reports. It is then reviewed by professional staff and our Community Solutions Team to ensure programs are meeting their stated goals.

Our staff attends professional development training regularly, as well as work with a dedicated committee of highly educated/trained volunteers.

We are committed to funding the top-quality programs in our community which are using best practices and measuring their success using common metrics. Our trained volunteers conduct extensive reviews of all programs that apply for a grant.

Our grant recipients report that this year...

1,050 people will have improved behavioral health
5,700 people will receive care for a chronic health issue
3,435 people will adopt healthier behaviors
6,270 children will achieve developmental milestones
756 at-risk students will earn passing grades in reading, math, and science
320 students will graduate high school with a plan for their future
280 people will increase their incomes
104 people will establish a savings
245 people will improve their credit score
320 youth will develop job skills
272 people will obtain employment or increase their wages

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people in Champaign County who wish to improve their health, education, or financial stability. We do this by working with a consortium of local nonprofit organizations which provide direct service.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, As we do not provide direct service, feeback comes to us through our grant partners.,

Financials

United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Carrie Eisenmenger

Northwestern Mutual

Term: 2020 - 2022

Michael Vittone

CLA

Caitlin Drake

Busey

John Kluth

CCMSI

Andy Quarnstrom

Champaign Firefighters Local 1260

Sarah Zehr

University of Illinois

Cheryl Barringer

Champaign Unit 4, Champaign Federation of Teachers

Mike DeLorenzo

University of Illinois

Carrie Eisenmenger

Northwestern Mutual - McClure Financial

Julie Dorner

CORE Spaces

Chris Evangelisti

Flex-n-Gate

Barb Harrington

Chris Kloeppel

Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 149

Kara Johnson

University of Illinois

Martin O'Donnell

Busey

Bob Rowe

Justin Spring

University of Illinois

Stephanie Stuart

Parkland College

Jewell White

University of Illinois

Scott Williamson

Mark Wisniewski

Busey

Valena Claiborne

Dr. Kayla Banks

Carle

Demetria Candler

AFSCME Local 2971

Josh Mirowski

Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 149

Dr. Warren McCauley

Carle

Luke Sullivan

Carle

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/25/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.