United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.

United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in Champaign County.

aka UWCC   |   Savoy, IL   |  www.uwayhelps.org

Mission

United Way of Champaign County brings people and resources together to create positive change and lasting impact in our community.

Ruling year info

1971

President and CEO

Sue Grey

Main address

5 Dunlap Court

Savoy, IL 61874 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

37-0662519

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At United Way we are aiming to create sustainable solutions to our community's most pressing social needs. In Champaign County, we fight to improve Education, Health and Financial Stability. These are the building blocks for a good quality of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Impact Fund

The Community Impact Fund provides grants to programs making a measurable impact on Edcuation, Income or Health in our county.

Population(s) Served

Emerging Community Leaders (ECL) is focused on teaching young professionals (generally 21-40 years old) how to Connect, Serve, and Lead in our community. We host an annual class-based program where participants learn about nonprofit organizations, how to serve on a board or as a high-level volunteer, how to be an effective volunteer fundraiser, and finally we connect young professionals with a volunteer opportunity that meets their personal and professional skills.

Population(s) Served

Our kindergarten readiness initiative focuses on helping the youngest members of our community and their caregivers prepare for kindergarten. The main components are our annual Getting Ready for Kindergarten calendar, free for all 4 and 5 year olds in the county, and our biennial Ready. Set. GROW! resource fair for parents of young children.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

4 Star Charity 2016

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who exhibit kindergarten readiness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Kindergarten Readiness Initative

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of program participants who obtain a job within 3 months of program completion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who were formerly credit invisible who now have an established credit score

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of graduates enrolled in higher learning, university, or technical/vocational training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Emerging Community Leaders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have specific target issues within our three areas.

Education:
Childhood Success
Grade Level Success
High School Graduation

Health:
Access to Healthcare
Access to Healthy Food
Independent Living
Safety

Financial Stability:
Financial Literacy
Stable Housing
Workforce Development

Our community faces complex challenges in healthcare, education and employment. These challenges don't have easy answers and have lasted months, years, and even generations.

To address our community’s most persistent and systemic problems, we must have an organized, proven strategy: we call it Community Impact.

Through Community Impact, we are re-imagining a more equitable and resilient community - one where more of our students are graduating prepared for success at college or on the job, more local families are financially stable and more neighbors are living healthy lives.

Our Community Impact Strategy has three parts:

The Community Initiative process provides resources to launch new and innovative programming
Community Impact Grants support high-quality local programs that have a track record of creating change
Community Building raises awareness, mobilizes volunteers, creates partnerships, and advocates to address critical issues

We use a sophisticated tracking tool called EC Impact. All of our grant recipients enter their data into this program in order to create comprehensive, standardized reports. It is then reviewed by professional staff to ensure programs are meeting their stated goals.

Our staff attends professional development training regularly, as well as work with a dedicated committee of highly educated/trained volunteers.

We are committed to funding the top-quality programs in our community which are using best practices and measuring their success using common metrics. Our trained volunteers conduct extensive reviews of all programs that apply for a grant.

Our grant recipients report that this year...

1,050 people will have improved behavioral health
5,700 people will receive care for a chronic health issue
3,435 people will adopt healthier behaviors
6,270 children will achieve developmental milestones
756 at-risk students will earn passing grades in reading, math, and science
320 students will graduate high school with a plan for their future
280 people will increase their incomes
104 people will establish a savings
245 people will improve their credit score
320 youth will develop job skills
272 people will obtain employment or increase their wages

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Champaign County Illinois, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/20/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Greg Anderson

U of I Community Credit Union

Term: 2020 - 2021

Michael Vittone

CLA

Caitlin Drake

Busey

John Kluth

CCMSI

Andy Quarnstrom

Champaign Firefighters Local 1260

Sarah Zehr

University of Illinois

Julie Shapland

University of Illinois

Beth Auterman

CLA

Cheryl Barringer

Champaign Unit 4, Champaign Federation of Teachers

Ben Brunworth

Altamont

Dawn Carson

Mike DeLorenzo

University of Illinois

Carrie Eisenmenger

Northwestern Mutual - McClure Financial

Julie Dorner

CORE Spaces

Chris Evangelisti

Flex-n-Gate

Barb Harrington

Chris Kloeppel

Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 149

Kara Johnson

University of Illinois

Martin O'Donnell

Busey

Dr. Blair Rowitz

Carle

Bob Rowe

Diane Ruedi

Justin Spring

University of Illinois

Stephanie Stuart

Parkland College

Jewell White

University of Illinois

Scott Williamson

Mark Wisniewski

Busey

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes