PERSONS ASSUMING CONTROL OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT INC (PACE, Inc. Center for Independent Living)

Promoting the full participation of people with disabilities in the rights and responsibilities of society.

aka PACE, Inc. Center for Independent Living   |   Urbana, IL   |  www.pacecil.org

Mission

PACE offers services that assist persons with disabilities in achieving and /or maintaining their independence.  Our goal is the full participation in the rights and responsibilities of society.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Nancy McClellan-Hickey

Director of Programs

Ms. Sherry Longcor

Main address

PACE, Inc. Center for Independent Living 1317 E Florida Ave

Urbana, IL 61801 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Champaign-Urbana Center for Independent Living

EIN

37-1186225

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One thing people with disabilities have in common is coming up against barriers to independence in the environment. Types of barriers are different. The deaf and blind run into different types of communication barriers( print and voice). People who have mental health concerns meet attitudinal barriers- stigma. People who have mobility concerns meet structural barriers when jobs, events, education, etc are in inaccessible locations. Many PWDs meet economic barriers due to unemployment, underemployment or medical costs. Traditional services considered the disability as the "problem", the PWD a "client" and the professional, an expert taking control. Independent Living Philosophy defines the environment not allowing for PWD's need as the problem. The PWD is the "consumer" choosing what they want. The consumer's control is the most important element. PWDs know best what they want and need IL professionals facilitate consumer direction, they don't manage cases. .

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Reintegration (from facility to community living)

This program aids individuals who are in nursing facilities and often financially trapped to move back into the community.
We can assist with the cost of obtaining an apartment (first month's rent/security deposit), accessibility modifications, as well as the necessities needed to make it a home (furniture, cleaning supplies, etc.) After initial setup and one months support the consumer takes over their own expenses.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Personal Assistant (PA) program - people who wish to work with people with disabilities (PWDs) are oriented on what it takes to be a PA and basic Independent Living Philosophy which specifies the person with the disability as the employer (not a patient).

PAs aid people who have disabilities with the activities of daily living (cooking, cleaning, personal care) with the goal of enabling the person in continuing to live independently in the community.

Once a person has been oriented to the job and Independent Living, they can be matched with a person who would like to hire them.

The person with a disability who needs the PA is in charge of the process, they select who they want to call, interview, and hire. The employer supervises and if necessary fires. PACE is a third party acting to get the two parties together. PACE is not the employer.

Most PAs are paid by Home Services, some people pay privately. PACE acts as a third party to make sure that both the PA and the employer with a disability have the tools necessary to make the relationship work.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

This program serves individuals with developmental disabilities. It is a referral service for Personal Support Workers. PACE acts as a third party bringing the person who has a developmental disability and often their family together with a person who wishes to be a personal support worker that meets the specific needs of the consumer.
This program is funded by the Champaign County Developmental Disabilities Board (CCDDB),

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

This growing program serves people over the age of 55 who are acquiring vision loss later in life. Many have macular degeneration, some diabetic neuropathy, or retinitis pigmentosa and more. The person tells us what they want assistance with, we listen and act as facilitators.

The primary focuses of this program are the monthly low vision support groups in each county, as well as the peer counseling services, and the adaptive technology demonstrations and giveaways which promote trying new ways of doing things to find what works best in the opinion of the person with the vision loss.

The people we serve tell us the program changes their lives and makes it possible for them to remain in their own home.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments
Seniors

Fast Track is for youth with disabilities ages 14-21

1. Job Exploration Counseling: This can be offered individually or within a group setting: career exploration for in-demand occupations, as well as nontraditional employment; labor market trends; career interest inventories, and identifying careers of interest to the student.

2. Work-based learning experiences: Work-based learning experiences, which may include internships and apprenticeships that are provided in an integrated environment to the maximum extent possible. These will include: On-the-job experiences and On-the-job training, Employer Paid Work experiences, Work-Site tours to learn about necessary job skills, job shadowing, mentoring opportunities in the community, internships, apprenticeships, short-term employment or fellowships.

3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Education: This can be offered individually or within a group setting. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or post-secondary education programs at institutions of higher education. This would include advising students and parents or representatives on academic curriculum, career options, providing information about college applications and admission processes, completing the FAFSA, advising on the types of academic and occupational training needed to succeed in the workplace, or providing disability support services.

4. Workplace Readiness Training: This can be provided individually or within a group setting. These are skills received beyond that received in a work-related class. This typically provides training in skill areas other than vocational development that students will need to function independently within the community. Skill areas may include, but are not limited to, the use of public transportation, meal preparation, money management, household management, communication, and interpersonal skills, job-seeking skills, understanding employer expectations and are tailored to the individual's needs.

5. Instruction in Self-Advocacy: This can be offered individually or within a group setting. Learning about rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations or services as well as being able to communicate any thoughts, concerns or needs while seeking services. Conducting informational interviews, mentoring with educational staff, employers, individuals in the community, or other areas and participating in youth leadership activities are all examples.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People with disabilities

Access Alley is a store setting where we have all kinds of assistive technology for all types of disabilities. From low tech items like sock puller-oners to OrCam a small camera perched on glasses that reads to the wearer print and once trained can identify faces by speaking their name. Access Alley is a place where you can come in with what is difficult for you or a person you know to do and we can come up with ideas of how you can adapt the task. It is a place where one can try before they buy an item. We have an internet connection and TV screen so we can show people items they may not know about as well as assist them in ordering or pull up a review by a person with a disability. Access Alley is located in Urbana with PACE, anyone from any other area is welcome to drive over and benefit from Access Alley. We can also work with people by phone.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Families

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PACE Center for Independent Living is a cross-disability organization many of us are people with disabilities. We bring people with all types of disabilities together to claim the power of the largest minority and work together to take down barriers. By taking down barriers in the environment we increase independence. That enables people with disabilities to take part in the rights and responsibilities of society.

Accessibility is key to Independence. People with Disabilities (PWDs) will vote if they can get to and in the polls. PWDs typically want to work but the unemployment rate is higher than people who don't have disabilities. If PWDs are judged by their abilities, can get into the workplace and communicate, they will work.

Another way we want to see consumer involvement is on decision making bodies of all sorts of organizations. A person who is blind on the Mass Transit Board can be sure riders with vision loss are considered in planning.

We want every consumer to have the opportunity to know about disability laws that protect their rights and learn skills to advocate for themselves and changes in the all types of systems changes that address the needs of people who have disabilities.

We want to support efforts of people who have disabilities to increase or maintain their independence with services that they want and need. For instance in our deaf services we keep an interpreter referral list for American Sign Language and we teach family and co workers sign.

We teach people with disabilities their disability rights by making them aware of the laws that protect their rights as a pwd. We assist them in recognizing their needs and developing skills of presenting those needs to decision makers. We also teach where their rights end and what they cannot expect and are responsible for themselves.

PACE provides services that support the efforts of people who have disabilities to live independently. We work to be sensitive to our own communities needs so the 22 centers of Illinois may provide different programs but all centers are mandated to provide 5 core services.
1. Information and Referral
2. Skills Training
3. Peer Counseling
4. Advocacy - systemic and individual
5. Transition (we provide Youth Transition from school to work and transition from nursing facility back to the community)

We also have specialty programs for Assistive Technology through Access Alley, Visual Impairment North of 55 yrs. Personal Assistance, Personal Support workers for people with Developmental Disabilities, ASL Interpreter Referral Lists, Fast Track Youth Transition for pwd age 14 to 21 yrs. We have services for the Deaf delivered in their first language by a person fluent in ASL.

PACE encourages opportunities for peers to speak with each other. There are things only a peer understands. No one knows better the needs of people who have disabilities than people with disabilities themselves. We operate according to the Independent Living Philosophy that greatly values what we call "consumer control." It is applied in our organization in many different ways. That is why our organization is mandated to be made up of no less than 51% of people with disabilities on our board and staff. PACE and other CILs have had consumer-directed services since the early '70s. We facilitate, we don't case manage. The consumer is the person who determines and directs their plan, we serve as facilitators to provide information and referral, skills training, advocacy, peer counseling, and transition services. All CILs offer those services, they are mandated. Beyond those services we have specialty programs; Deaf Services (facilitator is fluent in ASL), Visual Impairment North of 55 years, Personal Assistance and Personal Support Workers referral, Reintegration to community from Nursing facility, Youth transition from High School to secondary education or work. Advisory Groups are another way we apply consumer control. For each program we have an advisory of people who use the program. We may ask for their input on training, procedures, outreach etc. This is another way people who use the programs direct them.

PACE has been providing services for 30 years. We have a well-educated staff both educationally and personally with disability experience. We have been monitored in 2019 by the Department of Rehabilitation Services for adhering to the requirements of a Center for Independent Living and have met those requirements consistently.
We are knowledgeable about our area and resources. We have a state network with 21 other Centers in Illinois and our Executive Director sits on that board. We collaborate with the other CILs to advocate throughout Illinois. We live in a fairly accessible community and many PWDs have come to this community in order to attend the University of Illinois which is known for its accessibility. Surrounding communities are less accessible but open to services when they are practical and address the needs of the community.

We provide orientation to our Philosophy and PACE each new staff person their first month. We offer the opportunity for staff to have one time a year when they arrange training they feel would be beneficial to staff. Each Board meeting a staff representative is present to explain what they do in their program, board members can ask questions. Board members have a structured orientation. they are offered trainings through the Independent Living Research Utilization Project.



PACE has a formal appeal process that every consumer receives when they first engage in services. It outlines in detail how they can challenge the manner in which they received services. The process also tells them where they can find assistance in going through the appeal process outside of PACE.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People who have all disabilities - cross disability, all ages, in the coverage area of Champaign, Vermilion, Douglas, Edgar and Piatt counties in Illinois. We also serve families, friends, service providers and the general community regarding disability issues and education.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, phone surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Consumers who are north of 55 years and are losing their vision have requested more support groups and so has local assisted living programs asked to have groups at their facility. We now have 3 groups at facilities and are working to increase the number of meetings of our community groups as soon as COVID is at a level 5 in Illinois. We have added a position to this program to allow these increases in service. This program changes lives and the more we reach the more are extending their independence, remaining in their own homes.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    PACE is based on consumer control as a key element of the Independent Living Philosophy our organization is built on. Our board and staff must be 51% people with disabilities to assure that control is in the hands of the people we serve. Our staff are responsible for running an advisory group for the programs they run, which puts the feedback right on the front lines of our services. The needs assessment and satisfaction surveys we do annually are made into chart form and a PowerPoint presentation of those answers is presented to the staff and board. We have a diversity advisory that educates us on how to serve particular populations with whom we need to extend our services. We are more aware of making materials in Spanish, using deaf friendly language and much more.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

PERSONS ASSUMING CONTROL OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT INC (PACE, Inc. Center for Independent Living)
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PERSONS ASSUMING CONTROL OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT INC (PACE, Inc. Center for Independent Living)

Board of directors
as of 7/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Charles Lane

Consultant self employed

Term: 2021 - 2025

Dave Appleman Jr.

Urbana Schools

Charles Lane

Consultant Independent Living and Accessibility

Susan Dramin Weiss

University of Illinois, Il Assoc. of Deaf, Illinois Telecommunications Access Board - Board of Directors

Lisa Barkstall

DCFS

Daryl Darnell

Retired, volunteer

Laura Kelly

Illinois Association of the Deaf

Carl Stoltz

Retired, former UCP board

April Jackson

Director, Principal, Educator, Parent of pwd

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.