HeartLands Conservancy

aka HeartLands Conservancy   |   Belleville, IL   |  www.heartlandsconservancy.org

Mission

HeartLands Conservancy's mission is to connect, conserve, and restore the diverse natural and cultural resources that sustain the people and communities of southwestern Illinois.

Our Vision

We envision a future for southwestern Illinois where people, wildlife, and natural habitats thrive together because the community — private citizens, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies — has invested in the conservation of our natural places and resources.

Ruling year info

1991

President & CEO

Ms. Mary Vandevord

Main address

29 E Main Street

Belleville, IL 62220 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Southwestern Illinois Resource Conservation & Development Council

EIN

37-1273869

NTEE code info

Pollution Abatement and Control Services (C20)

Environmental Beautification (C50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Because of rapid development, we risk losing essential habitats, cultural resources, and restoration opportunities that will affect our quality of life forever. This closing window of opportunity demands that we work together, with immediacy, to ensure the character and resiliency of our region into the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Land Conservation

HeartLands Conservancy believes that when we conserve, restore, and steward land, we invest in people’s well-being. HeartLands Conservancy works with private landowners, public agencies, farmers, and community groups to conserve important ecological, agricultural, recreational, and cultural places. We also “create” places for community enjoyment, such as parks, gardens, and trails. To date, we have helped conserve and create 10,000 acres of these important places in southern Illinois.

Population(s) Served

We believe that for the people in our region to thrive, growth is necessary. However, we believe that cities and villages should host the majority of growth and development while integrating and considering nature in all aspects of growth. We believe this is cost-effective in the long run and favorable for community health, recreation, and economic development.

HeartLands Conservancy works with communities – frequently in a consulting-style role and or as a partner and collaborator – on projects and initiatives focused on our mission.

Population(s) Served

We will develop the next generation of conservationists in our region. We will engage a diverse spectrum of the public in an effort to illustrate the importance of our landscapes to our health, economy, and way of life through public access to properties as appropriate, recreational opportunities, stewardship activities, and educational programs. We will provide opportunities for all the people of our region to directly experience and enjoy the beauty, excitement, and value of our lands and waters.

Population(s) Served

Rain is essential to replenish our drinking water sources, water our crops and landscapes, and support wildlife habitat and recreation. As the climate changes, we are experiencing an increase in the frequency and intensity of rainstorms. As land develops, unnatural, hard surfaces cause the rainwater to flow faster. Along with it, pollutants pour into and damage our region’s creeks, lakes, and rivers – our primary drinking water sources.

Flash flooding also has tremendous impacts on people’s lives. Repeated flash floods cause damage to homes, cost millions in damage and lost wages, and cause stress and health issues. HeartLands Conservancy works in partnership with public entities, agencies and residents to protect and manage water in southwestern Illinois.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

What's Right with the Region 2020

FOCUS St. Louis

Affiliations & memberships

Land Trust Alliance

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Acres of land that have been reforested by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Land Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Land Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HeartLands Conservancy protects land through acquisition, easement, or by assisting with acquisition/transfer of the asset to the government or other conservation entity. To date: 9,851 acres

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a future for southwestern Illinois where people, wildlife, and natural habitats thrive together because the community — private citizens, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies — has invested in the conservation of our natural places and resources.

We have identified over 140,000 acres of core habitat that needs to be conserved (public or private) and a need for restoration of 84,000 acres of stream corridors (riparian zones). Our goal is to conserve and connect these resources to improve environmental health, increase access to recreation and nature for all who live in our region, and allow wildlife to migrate in a sustainable manner (increased biodiversity).

We are also trying to protect our region's cultural heritage - a major goal is to elevate 2,100 acres of Cahokia Mounds and expand the State Historic Site to a formal National Park Service unit.

HeartLands Conservancy is placing increased emphasis on engaging people with nature. Without people being able to experience, from an early age, their impact on the environment and why nature is so important, our efforts will be for naught.

We are also working hand-in-hand with local, state, and federal governments to make these efforts happen. Our environment will only improve with a conscious effort of local governments and demand from everyday citizens.

HeartLands Conservancy's staff is small, but mighty. Our 10 staff people have been able to leverage over $29 million into conservation efforts in southern Illinois. The staff is trained in environmental resources, biology, water quality, agriculture, urban planning, public policy, urban design, communications, sociology, landscape architecture, agronomy, and forestry.

Beyond the staff, volunteers help our efforts tremendously by assisting with our office needs, providing land stewardship services, and supporting our cause.

Our capacity expands when we partner with other organizations in our region. We are collaborators on many partnerships, such as the Middle Mississippi River Partnership, Kaskaskia Watershed Association, Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and many more.

We have protected over 10,000 acres of land, but have much more work to do. We are increasing efforts to restore stream corridors, which is more difficult because most are in private ownership. We have created a green infrastructure framework for two counties to guide our natural systems conservation work, but need to expand the plan to other counties and work with municipalities to implement it.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The over 700,000 people that live in southwestern Illinois are directly or indirectly served by our organization. Our regions demographics are diverse. Our program work tends to focus on adult ages and we focus on providing programs equitably across our region.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We had meeting times for a particular project in the evenings; however, the elderly program participants did not feel comfortable driving at night. We changed the time so that they would be driving during light hours while still enabling working people to make it after work. We also offered a virtual participation option.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has built more trusting and mutually respectful relationships.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

HeartLands Conservancy
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HeartLands Conservancy

Board of directors
as of 10/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. E. William Reichert, III

St. Clair County Public Buildings Commission

Term: 2015 - 2022

Robert Nelson

Nelson & Nelson

Dawnesha Johnson

Cliff Schuette

Schuette Seed Company

Nancy Larson

William Boardman

Firehouse Contracting

Janet Haroian

SIU-Edwardsville

Gary Huelsmann

Caritas Family Solutions

Anne Werner

Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville

Jim Pauley

Pufault-Pauley Insurance

Carol Gentry

Amy Kempfer

Associated Bank

E. William Reichert, III

St. Clair County Public Buildings Commission

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.