Her Future Coalition

Free Forever

aka Her Future Coalition, Made By Survivors, TEN Charities   |   Saint Augustine, FL   |  www.herfuturecoalition.org

Mission

Our mission is to help survivors of slavery and other forms of gender violence with shelter, education and employment programs that enable them to remain free forever

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Sarah Symons

Co Principal Officer

John Berger

Main address

PO Box 3403

Saint Augustine, FL 32085 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Emancipation Network

Made by Survivors

TEN Charities

EIN

37-1497985

NTEE code info

Economic Development (S30)

International Human Rights (Q70)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 40 million people in the world are enslaved, according to the UN with 10-15 million in India alone. The majority of those trafficked for sexual exploitation are women and girls. Trafficking cuts off education and economic opportunities, leaving girls vulnerable to exploitation throughout their lives. Trafficked girls endure physical, sexual and emotional abuse and torture. Tthey are often rejected by their families and communities, blamed for the abuse they have suffered. Many can never go home, so they need shelter until they are fully grown. Children who have been exploited, or whose parents were trafficked, are destined to repeat the cycle unless they are given education and support to build a different kind of life. Trafficking, as well as child marriage, have roots in poverty and in the low status of women. Without economic alternatives, girls become trapped in a life of exploitation, powerless to change the equation for themselves or their children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter programs

Building and expanding shelters for rescued girls, providing ongoing support for basic needs such as food and clothing

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Provide education to survivors of trafficking and their chlidren, and to high risk girls

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Provide job training and employment to survivors and high risk women, enabling them to live independently, support children and enjoy a quality life, as well as to gain decision making power in their families and community

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Awards

Ending Modern Slavery Award 2008

Ashoka Changemakers

Sam Walton Emerging Entrepreneur Award 2008

Sam Walton Foundation

V-Day Warrior Award 2006

V-Day Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

Freedom Business Alliance 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Education Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Through our School sponsorship and Shelter projects, Her Future provides school supplies, books, uniforms and meals to children in shelter, red light areas and slum communities in India and Nepal

Number of survivors and high risk girls educated in the past year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Education Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Her Future provides education to survivors of gender violence and high risk children in shelters, red light areas and slum communities of India and Nepal

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Employment program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Her Future provides vocational training - leading to employment - in many fields traditionally done only by men, such as our flagship training program in goldsmithing.

Number of girls sheltered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Shelter programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Working in collaboration with local agencies, Her Future provides high quality, long term shelter to rescued girls in India

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to fight slavery with shelter, education and employment programs that enable survivors and high risk women and children to remain free and independent, forever.

Working with this population for the last 12 years, we have learned that for people facing tremendous stigma, incremental gains in economic and social status are not enough. Survivors need a significant increase in social status and income in order to rejoin society and to gain decision-making power in the family.

We aim to offer high-quality, long term, and individualized services, rather than a quick fix, one-size-fits-all solution. Because of this time and care, survivors who graduate from our programs will be able to pay it forward - rescuing, supporting, training and inspiring others. As contributing wage-earners, they will become leaders and decision makers in their families and communities.

Our long-term vision is to create a corps of empowered, educated survivors who can change their society from within, ending slavery once and for all.

SHELTER: Rescued survivors need a safe place to heal and gain life skills. Many girls can never go home, because their families were involved in trafficking them, so they need shelter until they are fully grown and able to support themselves. Working with local partner agencies, we build, expand, and improve shelters, providing beautiful, spacious, loving homes to survivors.

EDUCATION: We sponsor the schooling of trafficking survivors and children at high risk - such as children of trafficked parents and those born in red light districts and border villages with a high incidence of trafficking. We have been sponsoring many of these same kids for 5+ years, and are committed to continuing our support as far as they want to go in life, ending the cycle of slavery and poverty.

EMPLOYMENT: Our primary focus is to provide economic solutions to slavery and other social problems destroying the lives of women and girls. Trafficking, as well as child marriage, have roots in poverty and in the low status of women. Without economic alternatives, girls become trapped in a life of exploitation, powerless to change the equation for themselves or their children. We focus on high quality, well paid professions, often in areas that have traditionally been male-dominated, such as goldsmithing.
Our jewelry program is one of our most successful job programs. It offers a complete pathway to independence and dignity. We train and employ survivors to become professionals and entrepreneurs, leaving poverty behind forever. We are able to pay professional wages because we balance artisanal techniques with sophisticated business process management and technology.
To promote the artisans' dignity and self-determination, we offer entrepreneurship training, employee ownership, advancement opportunities, continuing education, savings plans, housing, and other social programs. Our jewelers are pioneers as some of India's first women goldsmiths.

For 13 years, we have worked closely with local partner agencies to discover what is needed to help people recover from the devastation of trafficking and other severe gender violence, to become independent and to rejoin and contribute to society. We have listened, watched and learned from many exemplary frontline leaders, and also from the survivors themselves.

This deep listening, and responding to the needs expressed with relevant, effective programming has been, and is our greatest strength. It has allowed us to craft programs that truly meet the needs of rescued girls, of high risk children, and of women still trapped in prostitution.

Our team in India is comprised of talented, committed women who come from the very communities we serve. They bring a unique perspective that shapes our work.

Our US team brings expertise in business strategies (our co-Founder is a former investment banker with 18 years experience on Wall St) and in healing through the arts. We are technologically savvy, and this allows us to spend more money on programs by using the best technologies and managing our IT internally.

Finally, we are passionate about collaboration. Our model has always incorporated deep and longstanding collaboration with local agencies. Working together, we can leverage our strengths and accomplish more with fewer resources. Our partners speak the local languages, and have expertise in rescue and rehabilitation, as well as how to work with government and law enforcement.

Since 2005, we have helped over 30000 women and children on their journey to freedom with shelter, education and employment programs. We have built a shelter and expanded three others. We have built three Resource Centers for children and women in red light areas of Calcutta. We have educated 1500 children, including many who are now in college. We have trained and employed many women in professions which will enable them to live independently and enjoy a good quality of life.
Now that we have developed a model for success, we would like to offer it to many more women and girls. The waiting list for our programs is long. We would like to be able to offer long-term, high quality services to thousands more women and girls and to continue collaborating with other outstanding organizations, so that together we can finally bring an end to slavery.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We changed our name from Made By Survivors to Her Future Coalition at the request of program participants, who felt that the old name was limiting and possibly stigmatizing. They wanted a name that reflected their potential rather than the trauma of the past

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Her Future Coalition
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Her Future Coalition

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Diane Beale

EXP Learn

Term: 2017 - 2020

Shira Weinert-Cornfeld

Jeanette Pavini

Reel Deal Productions

Kara Penn

MissionSpark

Farah Khan

Catterton Investments

John Berger

Toniic

Sarah Symons

Her Future Coalition

Diane Beale

EXP Learn

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.