AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE CONSERVANCY (ARC), INC.

The bedrock of the herp conservation community

aka AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE CONSERVANCY (ARC), INC.   |   Louisville, KY   |  amphibianandreptileconservancy.org

Mission

ARC’s mission is the conservation of amphibians and reptiles and their habitats in the United States.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Joseph J. Apodaca PhD

Main address

6844 Bardstown Rd Ste 677

Louisville, KY 40291 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

37-1568787

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Amphibians and reptiles are essential to ecosystems, but they are declining faster, and are overall more threatened, than any other groups of vertebrate animals. As key components of food webs, their decline drastically affects other species. Humans benefit directly from amphibians and reptiles. They play a vital role in the biological pest control of both insects and rodents. Medicines derived from amphibians and reptiles are being used to treat many diseases. Amphibians and reptiles are also integral to the culture and religion of many societies. Perhaps most important, amphibians and reptiles are the modern-day “canaries in the coal mine.” Extremely sensitive to environmental changes, a decline in their populations is a warning that the health of an entire ecosystem is in danger. By doing what it takes to conserve amphibians and reptiles, we benefit all species in that ecological community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Conservation Projects

ARC goes to high-priority areas for amphibians and reptiles to improve their chances of survival. We study the populations of target species, formulate conservation plans, and implement conservation actions.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of IUCN Red List species with habitats in areas affected by operations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Conservation Projects

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Several IUCN species impacted by restoration efforts.

Number of conservation actions at site(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Conservation Projects

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of projects showing an upward trend in the number of conservation actions at site

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Conservation Projects

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Conservation Projects

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Conservation of imperiled amphibians and reptiles in Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas (PARCAs). PARCAs are places with exceptional diversity of amphibians and reptiles, or with a significant presence of rare species, that are capable of supporting viable populations.

2. Conservation of imperiled amphibians and reptiles through a wide variety of targeted projects.

3. Have a nationwide impact on amphibian and reptile conservation through fiscal sponsorship of Partners in Amphibians and Reptile Conservation (PARC). PARC is the largest and most comprehensive effort in the U.S. to conserve amphibians and reptiles, including members and representatives from government agencies, universities, nonprofit organizations, and private industries

1. Implementation of Current and New PARCAs. Implementation includes creating conservation plans to address threats and manage targeted species and their habitats, and then taking action to carry out those plans. Actions may include monitoring and managing target species, managing their habitats, training landowners in conservation practices, etc.

1.b Continue studies and conservation initiatives for rare amphibian and reptile species in existing PARCAs. Monitor species’ response to conservation actions and adjust accordingly. Continue engagement with state and federal partners.

1.b Initiate implementation of 9 new PARCAs by December 2021. Focus on areas that combine the greatest conservation value, the most beneficial partners, and the best opportunities for funding.


2. Complete current

ARC has been in operation since 2007. Since then ARC has completed dozens of successful projects, and launched our premier PARCA, which has greatly improved the management of imperiled species and their habitats in Francis Marion National Forest, South Carolina. That initiative, going strong since 2013, has demonstrated the effectiveness of the program and serves as a model for implementing additional PARCAs.

ARC’s senior staff has specialized expertise in herpetofauna conservation, especially PARCAs, and extensive experience in the management of multi-partner projects. Together with members of the Board, ARC has broad knowledge and deep roots in the amphibian and reptile conservation community. ARC’s special relationship with the national network of PARC provides exceptional access to the leading experts in herpetofauna conservation.

Past and current projects include wetlands restoration for imperiled amphibians, surveys and design of conservation plans for declining species, and educational materials and training workshops and landowners, habitat managers, and law enforcement. Future plans focus on the continuation and expansion of these conservation actions.

Financials

AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE CONSERVANCY (ARC), INC.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE CONSERVANCY (ARC), INC.

Board of directors
as of 8/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sarah Owen

Jimmy Bullock

Whit Gibbons

Sue Lieberman

Marvin Moriarity

Priya Nanjappa

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/19/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data