WHAT BETTER LOOKS LIKE INC

Create a better world for yourself and others.

aka N/A   |   West Hempstead, NY   |  whatbetterlookslike.org

Mission

What BETTER Looks Like fosters the development of beloved community by helping individuals imagine, articulate and create visions for a better world. The intentional infusion of love into our interactions has the power to create the radical changes necessary to make the world better.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Norma Loeb

Education Director

Christine Clarke MS

Main address

28 Walnut Street

West Hempstead, NY 11552 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

37-1608814

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In contemporary communities many people feel disconnected from others due to dissolution of naturally occurring social supports, lack of existing resources, and other cultural impacts. This is thought to be a basis of resultant societal problems, including isolation, lack of interest, violence and rage, and depression. WBLL concentrates its efforts on empowering community connection through advancing positive discourse and community function, as well as strengthening enthusiasm for civic engagement. WBLL inspires the building of social infrastructure that will foster safety and connection, and provides knowledge to assist communities to solve problems. WBLL helps individuals and groups to identify and define situations that impact negatively on their family, workplace, community or the larger world; to identify their goals; to mobilize solutions for meaningful change; and to discover their untapped resources and use mindful processing to develop existing talents and capacities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Village of Hope- Education for Life Program

What Better Looks Like operates a university education and vocational training program in the Village of Hope, Nyarugunga, Rwanda. Through payment of tuition and all related expenses, i.e. transportation/ books/fees/materials, as well as ongoing mentoring, residents are supported with career-readiness and earnings capability.
The need is urgent and substantial. Residents are survivors of the 1994 genocide that killed an estimated 800,000 people in three months in an area the size of New Jersey. This village is home to 350 people who have been identified by the Rwandan government as people in need: each family is given a small shelter, drinking water collected in cisterns and a very small government stipend that unfortunately still leaves most residents hungry. In this rural country where about 90% of the people are engaged in subsistence agriculture, these residents are considered the "poorest of the poor.” The people have very basic needs: food, clothing, education and a way to make a living.
What Better Looks Like operates this program because one of the founders of the organization is a Rwandan genocide survivor and knew of this particular village and its needs. Upon meeting the people, it was determined that they were in a good place to participate successfully in this program due to the basic stability of the village and the hopeful readiness of the people. Rather than giving a ‘handout’, the acting principle is that educated people can lift themselves out of the cycle of poverty and also support development of the Rwandan infrastructure, as the country strives to recover from the genocide.
All those assisted by the Village of Hope are invited to ‘give something back’ to contribute to the community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

WBLL provides experienced and talented speakers to lead customized presentations for businesses, community groups and schools. WBLL also partners with organizations to augment their ongoing programs. Programs are adapted for the group’s specific purpose and intent, e.g. address racial culture within an entire organization, or target bullying within a small part of a school. Programs are adapted to the demographic make-up as well as its life stage – children, adolescents or adults.

All content is designed to support positive citizenship, resilience, socio-cultural well-being, and immediately available problem-solving skills. The programs give the group a jumping off point for making their own BETTER world, and promote movement toward infrastructures of “Beloved Community” as described by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The programs teach skills that can be used by individuals: personal empowerment; how to shift thinking; and how participants can recognize their own talents and gifts, as well as how they would like to use them to make their community better.

Presentations and hands-on workshops offered include:
-"Creating Compassionate Communities: Using Humor and Storytelling to Examine the Role of Bullying in Schools and Society"
-"What BETTER Looks Like: Using Art to Imagine and Create a New Visions"
- "Twenty Gandhis: Using Our Collective Power to Change the World"
-"The Pursuit of Happiness: An Individual Pursuit and a Social Imperative"

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Six (6) community programs will be delivered during the year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

What Better Looks Like Community Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WBLL will increase outreach efforts to engage community organizations with our programs.

An average of 240 participants will be engaged in community programs during the year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

What Better Looks Like Community Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WBLL will focus on increasing the amount of participants in its community programs during the year.

Ten (10) high school graduates will be enrolled in a university baccalaureate program, or a commensurate combination of university students and certificate program trainees will be enrolled in schools.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People of African descent

Related Program

Village of Hope- Education for Life Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WBLL will provide funding for school or training program tuition, books, supplies, fees and transportation. Students grades will be monitored to ensure success at end of each semester.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WBLL works toward the goal of fostering the development of beloved community by helping individuals imagine, articulate and create visions for a better world. WBLL posits that infusing love into interactions within and between communities generates the power to create radical and fundamental changes for the better.
Participants in our community programs acquire these ideas and tools:
• Articulate a vision for what “better” would look like for them.
• Recognize that people experiencing problems need to take an active part in solving those problems.
• Identify the communities they wish to impact: family, town, country and world.
• Recognize that everyone has creative abilities – discover their own unique talents to heal, create, teach.
• Envision and describe, or symbolize through art, their concepts of what “better” would look like to them.
• Discover ways to use their voice and unique talents to create a more compassionate world.
• Understand the benefits of building community connections as a civic minded individual or group.
• Understand the value of increasing their willingness to be open to new information and regularly attempt understanding of other perspectives.
• Recognize that we need to create well organized social structures based on love and community.

Participants in our Village of Hope program have imagined a better world through education and training. WBLL provides financial support and arranges specialists to enable the students and trainees to take an active part in solving the problem of extreme poverty in their families and community. They are encouraged to give back to the community throughout their education/training period, as well as in years to come.

WBLL operates two projects: “Community Programs” in the New York metropolitan area, and the “Village of Hope” in Rwanda.

The Community Programs strategies include provision of customized presentations/workshops to teach the above goals, offered in the following formats:
• Speakers/ presentations for schools, community organizations and businesses.
• Workshops incorporating teaching of skills as well as creative expression through use of arts/crafts and media.
• Connection Circles- incorporating teaching of skills as well as group interactions and community building.
• “Communi-Tea”- ongoing, informal drop-in community connection gatherings.
• Documentary film screenings with follow-up panel discussion.
• Corporate diversity programs.

The Village of Hope project is an outgrowth of the experience of beloved community. A small village of 350 genocide survivors in Rwanda are offered support to lift them out of extreme poverty through the following methods:
• University education.
• Vocational training.
• English literacy competency assistance.
• Evidence-based mindfulness, breath, body awareness skills to mitigate the effects of trauma.

WBLL has a core group of six officers, and eight board members as well as additional volunteers. All are dedicated and talented, with a range of capacities and expertise to enable the organization to fulfill its mission since 2007. WBLL has a detailed website offering insight into all of its programs; postings of projects and events, both past and upcoming; press/media history; and a blog. WBLL has a mailing list (operated with Mail Chimp) of approximately 1,000; and a Facebook page reaching out to nearly 1,000. WBLL has produced four short films. The organization has also produced two successful galas; participation or sponsoring of fifty plus events; and one large event in New York City with over 1,000 participants.
WBLL, operating exclusively on donations, estimates between 400-500 discrete donors since inception; 200 gift/raffle donors; 15 ongoing monthly donors; and 2 corporate sponsors.

WBLL has developed and implemented written procedures and training to ensure quality, integrity and compliance with 503 c(3) regulations; a yearly written business plan with targeted and achieved expense ratios; and a procedure and compliance manual. WBLL has held two sizeable galas, and presented 15 “What Better Looks Like” awards to local community members who have made significant contributions to creating a better world.
Community Programs:
• Delivered more than 50 community programs and connection circles.
• Facilitated film screenings of 4 relevant documentaries followed by discussions central to key ideas of community-building;
• Hosted a guest speaker presentation with a Nobel Peace Prize laureate;
• Provided more than 75 drop-in gatherings for the purpose of exercising the principles of Beloved Community;
Village of Hope:
• Facilitated university education for 13 baccalaureate degree graduates;
• Enrolled 10 additional students currently in the process of earning a baccalaureate degree;
• Provided vocational training in sewing/dressmaking for 12 women;
• Funded trauma recovery work, which was offered to all interested village residents;
• Provided a village lending library;
• Provided assistance to specific residents when an urgent or crisis situation occurred.

Financials

WHAT BETTER LOOKS LIKE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WHAT BETTER LOOKS LIKE INC

Board of directors
as of 1/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

David Goldberg

G. Pirozzi Consulting

Term: 2016 - 2024


Board co-chair

Michelle Gervat

American Heart Association

Term: 2016 - 2024

Karen Messineo

Dealertrack Technologies

David Goldberg

G. Pirozzi Consulting

Michele Gervat

American Heart Association

Joseph Ledwidge

Joseph A. Ledwidge, PC

Liliane Gashumba

Communaute Economiques des Pays Des Grands Lacs (CEPGL) Rwanda

Thomas Leonard

Tax Executive Consultants

Kathleen (Shelley) Casserly

Farmingdale State College

Jennifer Petersen

Hofstra University Graduate Student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/07/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/07/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.