Alano Club of Kent County

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aka ACKC, North Club, GR Alano Club, Grand Rapids Recovery Center, North Club Cafe   |   Grand Rapids, MI   |  http://gralanoclub.org

Mission

Serving those affected by life-threatening addiction, the Alano Club of Kent County is a welcoming place supporting meetings and fellowship.

Ruling year info

1953

Executive Director

Mrs. Lisa M Derr

Main address

1020 College NE

Grand Rapids, MI 49503 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-1406840

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Associations (Non-Government) (Y43)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are a resource for the Grand Rapids community. While there are a lot of people who know about our resources, meetings, and fellowship; there are still people within the community who do not know our resources exist.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.

• The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.

• A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes.

• Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

https://www.aa.org/

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Families

Al‑Anon is a mutual support program for people whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. By sharing common experiences and applying the Al-Anon principles, families and friends of alcoholics can bring positive changes to their individual situations, whether or not the alcoholic admits the existence of a drinking problem or seeks help.

http://al-anon.org/

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOA) is a recovery program for adults whose lives were affected as a result of being raised in an alcoholic or other dysfunctional family. It is based on the success of Alcoholics Anonymous and employs its version of the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions.

http://www.adultchildren.org/

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Alateen, a part of the Al-Anon Family Groups, is a fellowship of young people (mostly teenagers) whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. By attending Alateen, teenagers meet other teenagers with similar situations. Alateen is not a religious program and there are no fees or dues to belong to it.

https://al-anon.org/for-members/group-resources/alateen/

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Families

Double Trouble in Recovery (DTR) is designed to meet the needs of the dually diagnosed, those with a substance use disorder and a mood or other psychiatric disorder. People struggling with alcohol or drugs while coping with anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder face unique challenges and DTR offers a community of support and recovery to face these challenges.

http://www.bhevolution.org/public/doubletroubleinrecovery.page

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults

Eating Disorders Anonymous (EDA) is a fellowship of individuals who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problems and help others to recover from their eating disorders. The only requirement for membership is a desire to recover from an eating disorder. There are no dues or fees for EDA membership. Our primary purpose is to recover from our eating disorders and to carry this message of recovery to others with eating disorders. In EDA, we try to focus on the solution, not the problem. Solutions have to do with recognizing life choices and making them responsibly. Diets and weight management techniques do not solve our thinking problems. EDA endorses sound nutrition and discourages any form of rigidity around food.

https://eatingdisordersanonymous.org/

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Adults

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is an international fellowship of people who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of their relationship to food and eating. Members have found that this program of recovery and the fellowship of others who share their problem helped them stop abusing themselves with food and begin living fulfilling lives. Through shared experience and mutual support, they help each other to recover from the disease of food addiction.



This program of recovery is based on the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous. They make use of AA principles to gain freedom from addictive eating. There are no dues, fees, or weigh-ins at FA meetings

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Adults

​Heroin Anonymous (HA) is a fellowship of men and women who have found a better way of life, free from heroin addiction. The fellowship is based on a twelve-step program of recovery—and if you wish to join, members are here to share what they have found. There are no dues or fees for membership; the only requirement is a desire to stay sober. Members are here to assist the next person seeking help with their own addiction.

http://heroinanonymous.org/

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is a nonprofit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs have become a major problem. There is no cost to attend, and the program is open to anyone who wants to overcome any substance dependence. The NA recovery method uses 12 steps that emphasize reliance on social support and a Higher Power. Even though the NA 12 steps use the Higher Power concept, the program is not affiliated with any religion. Sharing at meetings is voluntary and attendance is confidential.

https://www.na.org/

We also host other programs like Medicated-Assisted Treatment (MAT), Nar-Anon Family Group (ON HOLD), Recovery Infused Yoga, Refuge Recovery, SA AA, Marijuana Anonymous, Refuge Recovery, and Zen Meditation. To learn more, please visit our website: https://www.gralanoclub.org/programs

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults

SMART Recovery (Self Management and Recovery Training) provides assistance to individuals seeking abstinence from addictive behaviors. The approach used is secular and scientifically-based using on non-confrontational motivational, behavioral, and cognitive methods.

The purpose of SMART Recovery is to support individuals who have chosen to abstain, or are considering abstinence from any type of addictive behaviors (substances or activities), by teaching how to change self-defeating thinking, emotions, and actions; and to work toward long-term satisfaction and quality of life.

We also host other programs like Medicated-Assisted Treatment (MAT), Nar-Anon Family Group (ON HOLD), Recovery Infused Yoga, Refuge Recovery, SA AA, Marijuana Anonymous, and Zen Meditation. To learn more, please visit our website: https://www.gralanoclub.org/programs

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 2013

Chamber of Commerce 2014

Chamber of Commerce 2015

Chamber of Commerce 2016

Chamber of Commerce 2017

Better Business Bureau 2015

Better Business Bureau 2016

Better Business Bureau 2017

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2016

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2017

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2018

Better Business Bureau 2018

Chamber of Commerce 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of websites and organizations (outside of our organization) that share our resources and information

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Substance abusers

Related Program

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Everyone knows an alcoholic or an addict; but not everyone knows about the Alano Club of Kent County. Thankfully, our Club's information and resources, is advertised on numerous recovery websites!

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We proudly keep our doors open everyday of the year, to include holidays! Everyday, we are open from 8am-9:15pm, for meetings and fellowship! 13.25 hours a day x 365 days = 4836.25 hours of service!

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are aiming to grow our Community Partnership Program (CPP). We will seek out new partnerships and ask currents ones to stay with us. As your partner, we are proud to promote and celebrate your commitment to our mission and vision through branding and media exposure. We are also eager to offer opportunities for you and your staff to learn more about the life-changing work of recovery happening here every day.

In order to heighten the community that we are here for them; we intend to get out in the public more and engage the community through presentations of our resources. We intend to get more involved with the schools, law enforcement, and local medical community. We want to be one everyone's radar so that everyone knows we are here for them and their recovery journey vs. not knowing we exist or where to turn.

We are capable of doing PowerPoint Presentations and intend to schedule a few each quarter. Additionally, we want to run social media advertising campaigns to make people aware of all of the resources that we offer here.

We are reaching out to various companies in HR departments. We are sharing an "infographics flyer" and requesting for them to post it in their breakrooms. This is just one of many efforts to help make the community aware that we are here for those in need 365 days a year, including holidays, from 8 AM to 9:15 PM. However, COVID-19 has changed our hours and recommend reviewing our website for the most up to date information: www.gralanoclub.org

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Alano Club of Kent County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Alano Club of Kent County

Board of directors
as of 8/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Elisha Ash

Recovery Coach at Network 180

Term: 2017 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr Brad Rose

Clayton Homes

Term: 2020 - 2023

Amelia Mueller

Mercantile Bank

Mark Rector

Credit Manager, Skytron LLC

Margaret Stalker

Warner Norcross & Judd, LLP

Michael Baker

Cherry Health

Elisha Ash

Network 180

Lucas DeBlaay

Van Dellen Steel

Don Nicewander

Certified Facilitator for SMART Recovery

Brent Doornbos

Expressions of Grace and Cascade Yoga Studio

Elisha Ash

Network 180

Jose Salinas

Network 180

Lauren Frasier

GFS

David Hamilton

Student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/25/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.