Kalamazoo County Humane Society

Not a shelter. Not a Rescue. A Solution.

aka Kalamazoo Humane Society   |   Kalamazoo, MI   |  https://www.kazoohumane.org/

Mission

THE MISSION OF THE KALAMAZOO HUMANE SOCIETY IS TO FOSTER AN ENVIRONMENT OF RESPECT, RESPONSIBILITY, AND COMPASSION FOR ALL ANIMALS THROUGH EDUCATION, PET POPULATION CONTROL AND LEADERSHIP.

Notes from the nonprofit

Between 2019 and 2020 we moved 2 times, finally landing in our brand new Charles C. and Lynn L. Zhang Animal Care & Resource Center in December of 2020. We opened to the public in 2021, in the midst of a global pandemic that had been in full swing for about a year at that point. While our spay and neuter program and volunteer usage saw reductions in service due to executive orders prohibiting non-essential veterinary care and our moves, other programs such as our pet food bank increased drastically. We're looking forward to continuing to address pet overpopulation and improving the lives of animals belonging to impoverished pet owners during these ever-changing and challenging times.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Mr Aaron Winters

Main address

2272 River Street

Kalamazoo, MI 49048 USA

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EIN

38-1474932

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pet overpopulation resulting in overcrowded shelters, rescues at full capacity and euthanasia of healthy, adoptable animals. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased demand for affordable spay and neuter services as well as access to pet food and basic pet supplies.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Spay/Neuter

KHS offers a low-cost spay and neuter clinic that also provides basic vaccines, testing and services for cats and dogs by appointment. The cost is substantially lower than that of local veterinary clinics. Volunteer hours may be exchanged for $10 credit toward surgery expenses, and free/reduced services are available on a case-by-case basis. This program is open to the public. We are currently serving 13 counties in southwest Michigan and northern Indiana, although the majority of our clients are within Kalamazoo county.

As we grow our program, we hope to transport animals in from local rescue/sheltering groups as well as expand our trap-neuter-release services for those managing feral cat colonies.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

The pet food bank is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 AM to 3 PM and allows those in a temporary financial crisis the opportunity to receive pet food, treats, litter and other pet supplies as available to avoid the need to rehome the pet(s) in their care. This service keeps families together during times of crisis, and keeps pets with the families that love them. Pets can be neglected, abandoned or displaced during periods of financial instability, which puts a strain on local shelters and rescues and separates owners from their beloved pets. The pet food bank can take the burden of pet care off the owner so they can focus on feeding themselves and their family while working on improved financial stability.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, when Michigan closed business and non-essential services, our pet food bank remained open as an essential service as permissible under that executive order. We continue to see a rise in food bank clients as the COVID-19 crisis affects more and more people due to job loss, illness or other pandemic-related personal crisis.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

We're happy to provide free or low-cost housing for outdoors dogs. These pets may be referred by local law-enforcement as part of a welfare investigation, or pet owners may call and ask for assistance. In most cases, these dogs are not acclimated to indoor life and the owner is either unable or unwilling to bring the dog inside during inclement weather. We provide shelter and dry bedding to bring the shelter of the dog up to legal minimum standards.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

In cases of crisis or domestic violence, we will pay for pets to be temporarily boarded while the owner is finding alternate safe living arrangements. In many cases of abuse, the abuser will threaten animals that the victim holds dear as a means to control the victim. We remove that threat by providing discrete and safe housing for the pets while the victim seeks assistance. In crisis situations, we can also offer temporary housing for a limited number of pets while the owner makes alternate housing arrangements.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Adults

Unofficially, we are able to provide payment for emergency veterinary care when the prognosis is good and the injury was non-negligent or excessive in treatment. Many owners are unable to afford unexpected emergencies as they happen. In some cases, we are able to provide payment for the initial exam and treatment to prevent and otherwise healthy pet from being euthanized due to a lack of funds. This service is authorized on a case-by-case basis.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We are able to provide our local municipal shelter with funds to support pet adoption and to promote the shelter pets. This includes paying for fees associated with shelter volunteers and pets attending community events, providing equipment or material to promote adoptable animals on Petfinder and other relevant outlets, and to help bathe animals prior to public events to assure they are clean and presentable when meeting new potential adopters.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Spay/Neuter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We provide for spay and neuter surgeries for cats and dogs only. In 2019 and 2020, our services were impacted by 2 relocations and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes individual and group volunteers, community service and school-related volunteer opportunities.

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Emergency Pet Food Bank

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of visits to the pet food bank

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Emergency Pet Food Bank

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of dog houses provided for outdoor dogs with inadequate shelter

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Dog Houses & Straw

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are working to reduce pet overpopulation and help owners keep the pets they already have by offering services that will reduce unwanted litters of cats and dogs and provide assistance to pet owners in a financial crisis or personal hardship.

With our move to the newly constructed Charles C. and Lynn L. Zhang Animal Care & Resource Center in late 2020, we are excited to phase in expansions on our existing programs and provide additional veterinary and community assistance programs beginning in 2021.

We offer free/low-cost spay and neutering with basic prevention services to reduce the number of unplanned and unwanted cats and dogs. Adoption promotion at our local municipal shelter helps to place animals that have found themselves in a shelter environment. By providing food, dog houses, and pet supplies to families that need assistance, we're preventing pets from being abandoned or surrendered to shelters and rescues and keeping them with the families they already have. By preventing animals from entering shelters and rescues needlessly, the shelters and rescues are able to focus on the smaller percentage of animals that legitimately need rescue and adoption services.

We've altered over 75,000 cats and dogs in southwest Michigan since we began that service in 2002. We're feeding approx. 50 local cats and dogs each day and providing over 55,000 lbs of food and litter annually to families in need of adequate food for their pets. As of January 2021, we have just moved into our new facility, the Charles C. and Lynn L. Zhang Animal Care & Resource Center. This new state of the art veterinary facility will continue our spay and neuter program, and phase in a fully functional wellness clinic.

We have been successful in reducing numbers of animals in the greater Kalamazoo area, and we hope to increase our capacity with the completion of our new building so that we're able to accommodate more surgeries. The demand outweighs our current capacity and those are needs we plan to meet and expand on as we expand our services in the new Charles C. and Lynn L. Zhang Animal Care & Resource Center.

Financials

Kalamazoo County Humane Society
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Kalamazoo County Humane Society

Board of directors
as of 2/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Benjamin Damerow

W.E. Upjohn Institute / Michigan Works! Southwest


Board co-chair

Bette Zawacki

Kalamazoo Township Offices

Benjamin Damerow

Michigan Works! Southwest at W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment

Karen Arvanigian

The Trinity Group

Mike Wittenberg

Newell Brands

Bette Zawacki

Sondra Nowak

Laura Vennie

Newell Brands

Stacy Nowicki

Kalamazoo College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No