Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes, Inc.

aka Junior Achievement   |   Grand Rapids, MI   |  michigangreatlakes.ja.org

Mission

Our mission is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. Our volunteer-based K-12 programs foster work-readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy skills, and use experiential learning to inspire kids to dream big and reach their potential.

Ruling year info

1994

President

Mr. William C Coderre, III, CFRE

Main address

4090 Lake Dr. SE

Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-1557861

NTEE code info

Business, Youth Development (O53)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Ourselves - Kindergarten

Students are introduced to personal economics and choices consumers make ti meet their needs and wants. They learn about the role of money in society and gain practical information about earning, saving, and sharing money.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

By focusing on the roles people play in their local economy, students learn the importance of work and entrepreneurship. They become aware of how families earn money to pay for their needs and wants.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Through hands-on activities, students see how citizens benefit from and contribute to a community's success. Various jobs and their required skills are identified to demonstrate how the work people do positively affects a community's economy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

City life comes into sharp context as students explore the importance of money and the different ways people pay for goods and services. Students consider the contributions that financial institutions make to a city and how they help businesses and people achieve their economic goals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Am I an entrepreneur? Students explore entrepreneurship and how entrepreneurs use natural, capital, and human resources to produce goods and services. They examine traits of successful entrepreneurs and apply them to their own skills and abilities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Students gain practical information about the U.S. free market system and how it serves as an economic engine for businesses and careers. They learn that entrepreneurial and innovative thinking are required for high-growth, high-demand careers in a global economy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

What good is saving money of young people aren't taught how to save, spend, and share it? Students learn these essential financial skills and how entrepreneurial thinking and being money savvy can turn an idea into a successful business in their community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

At JA BizTown, students operate banks, manage restaurants, write checks, use debit cards, and vote for a mayor. They connect the dots between what they learn in school and the real world.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Building a life is a complex project, particularly for young people entering the world of work. This program shows students how to earn money, spend wisely within a budget, save and invest, use credit cautiously, and protect their personal finances.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Students experience the worldwide interdependence of producers, consumers, and the global workforce as they take on the roles of business owners and managers. They analyze international business ethics and the culture, currency, and trade barriers of other countries.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

What does it take to be successful in today's working world? While still in middle school, students explore potential careers, discover ways to plan for and keep a job, and prepare their personal-brand maps to the future.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Can anyone learn to be an entrepreneur? Yes. During this program, students discover the key characteristics of successful entrepreneurs: belief in yourself, fill a need, know your customer and product, and be creative and innovative.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

At JA Finance Park, students act as adults and make personal finance decisions in a realistic facility, mobile unit, or virtual community. they develop lifelong financial skills through in-class and simulated experiences.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Why not start an entrepreneurial venture while in high school? This program dispels entrepreneurship myths, provides tools to develop a business plan, and inspires students to take innovative action to successfully compete in the marketplace.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

This program equips today's students with the skills needed to compete for high-demand, high-growth careers in the world marketplace. Students focus on developing the 4Cs - critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Entrepreneurship comes to life as students launch an actual business venture with the help of educators and community volunteers. The multi-dimensional experience infuses online learning, digital tools, contemporary teaching methodology, and trends in business startups.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Students explore basic characteristics of the U.S. economic system and how economic principles influence business decisions. They examine careers, consumer issues, and leadership skills and put into practice data analysis, problem solving, and critical thinking.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Hands-on classroom activities foster lifelong skills and knowledge about how an economy works, including micro-, macro-, personal, and international economics. Students examine the importance of international trade and the effects of inflation.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

What does it take to get and keep a job in a competitive job market? This classroom and site-based program prepares students to be entrepreneurial thinkers and encourages them to develop personal strategies to pursue lifelong learning and career opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

This individualized program helps students plan for their financial future. They learn how budgeting, saving and investing money, using credit cautiously, and protecting personal finances can secure financial stability.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

This Web-based simulation allows students to operate a virtual company in which success depends on decisions about their product's price, marketing, R&D, and business practices. Win or lose, students realize how management decisions affect a company's bottom line.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of student market served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percent of the total student population served in our geographic area.

Number of students enrolled in service-learning courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, schools shut down, which limited our access to providing programming for K-12 students. We transitioned all of our traditional programming into virtual resources.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals who volunteers who either taught JA programs or served in other capacities.

Number of Students who Demonstrate an Increased Knowledge in Financial Literacy, Work Readiness, and Entrepreneurship.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of schools enrolled in our programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Each year Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes strives to focus in on our three most important community builders: students, educators, and volunteers. We are deeply committed to our mission promise, empowering young people to own their future financial success. In short, we are taking students from an attitude of "I can't" to "I CAN" by providing the tools and inspiration to follow their dreams by finding their path to success through programs focused on entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness.

Providing top quality K-12 programming built on a foundation of financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and work readiness. Our strategy for ultimately building a brighter future for our community is to continue obtaining funding from businesses and individuals who are passionate about our mission. Often these same constituents provide the dedication needed to deliver that programming as volunteers to provide students with the ultimate experience by learning from live mentors who deeply care about sharing what they have learned in order to guide and serve our youth. Thankfully, JA USA provides scientific research showing exceptional results which we use to prove our great impact on our community.

Armed with a stellar team of employees, board members, donors, volunteers and educators, JA makes it happen every day by keeping our mission statement front and center and by executing each classroom experience, fundraising event and board meeting with integrity, innovation, collaboration, and a deep belief that we can and WILL make a difference.

In the 2019-2020 school year, Junior Achievement was still able to serve 53,00 students, despite the challenges faced with schools shutting down due to COVID. We did this by transitioning all our traditional programming to be made available online, reaching schools in 50 counties across Michigan. In the midst of a challenging year, we still were able to brake ground on a new 35,000 square foot facility, which will provide experiential learning labs. 20,000 students from across the Western half of Michigan are expected to visit the facility each year. It's expected to open in 2021.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 9/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

William Kessel

Independent Bank

Term: 2020 - 2021

Robert Worthington

Mercantile Bank

Joe Tomaszewski

Crowe, LLP

Mike Volk

Davenport University

Lance Erickson

Fifth Third Bank

James Nicholson

Bissell

Scott Fiser

Bank of America, Merrill Lynch

Sarah Mezwicki

Ernst & Young, LLP

Robin Kleinjans-McKee

OST

Kevin Patterson

BDO USA

John Maynard

KPMG US

Marti Lolli

Priority Health

Lea Ammerman

MSUFCU

Jodi Havera

MSUFCU

William Coderre, III, CFRE

Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes, Inc.

Noble Billingsley

DTE Energy

Kim Baber

Varnum

James Bos

YanFeng Automotive

Jennifer Bowman

Michigan Dept. of Talent & Economic Development

Meredith Brown

Kilwins Petoskey

Steve Carlson

Retired (GE Aviation)

Rhonda DeBoer

Autocam Corp.

Krista Flynn

West Chemical Bank

Ron Foor

Fifth Third Bank

Scott Harris

The Huntington National Bank

Jeff Harrison

Haworth, Inc.

Kris Kurtz

Metro Health University of Michigan Health

Monica King

DWH

Mark Lardieri

CQL Inc.

Zachary Littleton

JP Morgan Chase Bank

Chris Milliron

TBA Credit Union

Ronald Modreski

RAM Management Group

Gregg Peters

Sound Off Signal

Gwen Sandefur

Loud Minds

David Seppala

Isabella Bank

Matthew Smith

Deloitte Tax LLP

Rich Sorota

Perrigo

Martin Stein

Blackford Capital

Mike Stornant

Wolverine Worldwide, Inc.

Victor Sturgis

Crowe Haworth, LLP

Tim Williams

Retired (Stryker)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/18/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/11/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.