PLATINUM2023

Focus: HOPE

Detroit, MI   |  www.focushope.edu

Mission

Focus: HOPE is a non-profit, civil and human rights organization located in Detroit, Michigan. Founded in 1968 in the wake of the 1967 Detroit civil unrest, Focus: HOPE unites a multicultural community in intelligent and practical action to overcome racism, poverty and injustice. Over the years, Focus: HOPE has initiated practical solutions to the problems of hunger, economic disparity, inadequate education, and racial divisiveness. Focus: HOPE provides an intergenerational and holistic mix of services to disrupt the lasting effects of racism, poverty and other forms of social injustice in southeast Michigan.

Ruling year info

1971

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Portia Roberson Esq.

Main address

1400 Oakman Blvd

Detroit, MI 48238 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-1948285

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Generational poverty perpetuated by systemic racism and discrimination continues to plague Detroit. A mix of complex circumstances, including but not limited to inadequate education systems, unaffordable housing, and school-to-prison pipeline policies have prevented many from achieving self-sufficiency and economic mobility. Despite this reality, Detroiters have proven themselves to be some of the most resilient, resourceful, and entrepreneurial communities to endure such conditions. The Motor City has the sixth highest amount of African American middle-class neighborhoods. However, disparity can be further evidenced by Detroit having the fewest middle-class neighborhoods among the top 50 cities in the U.S. A total of 27,700 African American families would need to move into the middle class to create a more equitable future for the children of Michigan's largest city. Focus: HOPE provides workforce development, early learning, and food distribution to help combat this reality.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food for Seniors

Food for Seniors provides 41,000+ low-income seniors with monthly food packages to assist with independence, healthy living and addressing basic needs. The program also provides important infrastructure for health screenings, income support, and tax preparation for seniors and the community at large.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

With an extraordinary record of success in working with underserved and underrepresented adults in Southeast Michigan, we offer high quality work readiness, pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs in a range of in-demand career fields, serving over 600 students in 2019.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people

Focus: HOPE’s Early Learning programming aims to build a cradle to career pipeline of educational opportunity by providing quality early childhood education for newborn to five-year-olds through evidence-based models.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

The Youth Development program includes education, recreation and leadership development activities for students during out-of-school time - including a 21st Century Community Learning Center, Excel Photography, and summer camp programming.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Focus: HOPE pursues leadership as an antiracism organization by advocating for systems change and integrating racial equity into all it does. Additionally, each core program area is undergirded with services such as financial coaching, accounting assistance, and utility payment assistance, creating a one-stop community hub.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students registered for online courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Work status and occupations, Social and economic status

Related Program

Workforce Development & Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Early Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Food for Seniors

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Intelligent and practical action to overcome racism, poverty and injustice.

The intelligent and practical actions embarked upon include early learning, youth development, workforce development, and food for seniors initiatives, undergirded by foundational tenets of advocacy, equity, and community empowerment. These strategies combine to provide opportunities for individuals and families to empower themselves and make a difference in their communities.

Our long-standing programs, each led by subject matter experts, follow best practices, and our wide range of community partnerships ensures wraparound success.

Since 1968, Focus: HOPE has served thousands of children, students, and seniors, all while acting as a community leader around areas of justice and equality. We have recently refocused on our core mission, and we are committed to continuing to serve the community with intelligent and practical action, with the goal of overcoming racism, poverty and injustice in our area.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Focus: HOPE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Focus: HOPE

Board of directors
as of 10/31/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. D. Scott Sandefur

Retired, VP at General Motors

Term: 2020 - 2024

John A. Dunn

President, Ulitimaster

Carlton M. Faison

Senior Vice President, Global Commercial BaBank of America

Kevin Gentner

Superior National Bank, Market Lead, Trust Investment Head

Steven Jensen

Partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Burt Jordan

Atlantic Coastal Aquisition

Paul N. Myles

Sr. Manager, Government Workforce Development and Training Programs, Magna International

Catherine Clegg

Retired, General Motors

Jane Fran Morgan

President, JFM Consulting Group

Kristi Stepp

Partner, Sigred Solutions

Leo Stevenson

Sr. Resident Director, Wyandotte, Merrill Lynch

Lizabeth Ardisana

CEO, ASG Renaissance

Lisa Caldwell

Managing Partner of the Americas Consulting Practice, Ernst & Young LLP

Tammy Golden

Executive Dir., Workforce Strategy, General Motors

Jodi Frisicaro

VP & General Auditor, DTE

Marco Purty

VP Global Workplace Safety, General Motors

Christopher Pardi

Stellantis

Donetta Houser-Sly

HR Director, North America Fulfillment, Amazon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/31/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.