PLATINUM2023

Eversight

Making Vision A Reality

Ann Arbor, MI   |  https://www.eversightvision.org

Mission

We restore sight and prevent blindness through the healing power of donation, transplantation and research.

Notes from the nonprofit

Hundreds of millions of people cannot see their loved ones, drive to work or read the newspaper on a Sunday morning. Their vision loss results in an economic impact of $51.4 billion every year in the United States alone. Eversight envisions a world without blindness—a world where all mothers can see their children and every child can grow up to lead independent, productive lives through the gift of sight. Eversight is responsible for recovering, evaluating and providing human eye tissue for transplantation; supporting research into the causes and cures of blinding eye conditions; promoting donation awareness through public and professional education; and providing humanitarian aid to people around the world in need of corneal transplantation. Founded in 1947, the nonprofit operates 24/7/365 in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio and South Korea, and collaborates with surgeons, researchers, academic medical centers and eye banks across the United States and abroad.

Ruling year info

1976

President/CEO

Diane Hollingsworth

Main address

3985 Research Park Drive

Ann Arbor, MI 48108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-2117115

NTEE code info

Organ and Tissue Bank (E65)

Eye Diseases, Blindness and Vision Impairments (G41)

Eye (H41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Corneal blindness is the fourth leading cause of blindness worldwide after cataracts and glaucoma. Blinding eye diseases affect 80 million Americans. Their vision loss results in an economic impact of $51.4 billion every year in the United States alone, according to a report from the EBAA. Ten million people suffer from bilateral corneal blindness, and 12.7 million people are waiting for a unilateral corneal transplantation procedure, according to the National Eye Institute. Cornea transplants are the most common type of transplant, with a success rate of more than 95%. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, since 1961, more than one million Americans from nine days old to 100+ years in age have had their sight restored through a corneal transplant. This is a critical surgery that thousands depend on to live their lives to the fullest, and Eversight plays a key role in providing tissue for these transplants for individuals across the US and worldwide.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Donation

What would life be like if you couldn’t see? Imagine not being able to work, see the faces of your loved ones or appreciate a bright, sunny day. For millions of people around the world, this reality impacts every part of their lives.

But there is hope. For more than 70 years, donors and their families have made our mission to restore sight and prevent blindness possible by consenting to donation. During the recovery process, our highly trained technicians assess, preserve and transport each donor’s gift with care and precision.

And those donations mean everything for the recipients. Evelin Vazquez feared for her sight because of a progressive eye disease, but a cornea transplant using tissue donated from someone she will never know allowed her to follow her dreams and care for her 5-year-old son. Evelin even had the opportunity to meet her donor’s mother—an emotional encounter between two people brought together by the gift of sight.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with vision impairments

The miracle begins with the selfless generosity of a donor and their family who, in their time of grief, choose to say yes to donation in hopes of helping others.

Eversight is responsible for coordinating the eye tissue recovery process with healthcare staff and organ procurement organizations. Our staff travel to hospitals and other facilities to recover tissue and return it to our laboratory for evaluation. Once the donated tissue arrives at our lab, it is carefully evaluated to ensure it is safe for transplantation.

Thanks to advances in tissue-preservation methods, corneas can be transplanted up to 14 days after donation. In the United States there is no waiting list for a cornea transplant.

When a surgeon has a patient in need of a transplant, they contact Eversight to arrange for donated eye tissue to be sent to them for surgery. Eversight is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week to make sure tissue is always available for surgeons and patients like you.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments
Adults

Eversight provides more than 3,000 tissues for research and education annually. Our dedicated research team is trained to recover tissue under strict time and environmental conditions to preserve the integrity of precious biological specimens. In addition, Eversight offers comprehensive donor medical, ocular and social history information with serology results upon request.

Population(s) Served
Academics
People with vision impairments

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals who received a second chance for sight through corneal transplantation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with diseases and illnesses, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Transplantation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of people who received a second chance for sight through corneal transplantation with the help of Eversight.

Number of people who received transplantation through financial aid.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with diseases and illnesses, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Transplantation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of people who received transplantation through financial aid.

Number of tissues donated for research

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with diseases and illnesses, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Research

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of tissues that were donated to advance promising eye and vision research.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Eversight's organizational goals include:

Goal #1: Continue to provide for every request for a sight-restoring transplant.

Goal #2: Continue providing for 100% of eligible requests through our Gift of Sight charitable program for under- and uninsured patients.

Goal #3: Contribute new and unique scientific discoveries to advance solutions to blinding eye diseases and create safer tissue transplantation outcomes.

Goal #4: Provide training for more local surgeons and healthcare professionals to ensure best practices and best patient outcomes.

Strategies specific to the above goals include:

Goal #1: Continue to provide for every request for a sight-restoring transplant. We expect to achieve this goal through the long-standing relationships we have built with local organ procurement organizations and through all necessary measures to ensure our 24/7 staffing for recoveries, with oversight and close collaboration of our Medical Advisory Committee, ensuring the safety of our recovery staff and the safety of the tissue provided for transplants.

Goal #2: Continue providing for 100% of eligible requests through our Gift of Sight charitable program for under- and uninsured patients. Support from the Eversight Board of Directors, local Lions Clubs, foundation and corporate partners and individual contributions will allow us to sustain this much-needed program.

Goal #3: Contribute new and unique scientific discoveries to advance solutions to blinding eye diseases and create safer tissue transplantation outcomes. Our strategic fundraising plan prioritizes securing funds for research and innovations, to sustain this critical work.

Goal #4: Provide training for more local surgeons and healthcare professionals to ensure best practices and best patient outcomes. We will sustain these services through grant funding that supports our clinical staff experts, training supplies and necessary technology for web-based training.

Our organization has proven past success in exceeding each of the above stated goals:

Goal #1: Every year, Eversight works with more than 6,000 donor families to give the gift of sight to more than 8,000 people across our service areas. As one of the nation's largest nonprofit eye banks, we have the staff, resources and expertise to continue to meet this need for sight-restoring tissue.

Goal #2: To date, we have provided for 100% of eligible requests for Gift of Sight support since the establishment of the program.

Goal #3: Eversight has a long-standing commitment to ocular research. For more than 70 years, we have provided precious post-mortem tissue to researchers investigating eye and vision diseases. In 2021, Eversight distributed 4,109 tissues for research and education worldwide. Since 1980, we have offered micro-grants providing critical seed money to promising research projects at major academic centers of excellence.

Goal #4: In 2021, Eversight provided training and education for 898 surgeons, fellows, residents, coordinators and other clinicians.

Eversight's recent key accomplishments include:

Cornea/eye tissue donation and transplants: We worked with the families of 6,609 cornea/eye tissue donors who gave the gift of sight to benefit vision transplantation, research and education and local surgeons relied on us to provide 8,495 tissues for safe transplantation for their patients. 

Research and innovations: The Center for Vision and Eye Banking Research is where Eversight conducts research into finding cures for blinding eye diseases and improving outcomes in corneal tissue transplantation. In 2021, Eversight was awarded the Eye Bank Association of America’s sole High Impact Grant for the second time in the last three years. This grant will support our work with limbal stem cell procurement. The intended impact of this research is to make possible the eye bank preparation and storage of tissue for use in simple limbal epithelial transplantation to treat limbal stem cell deficiency, a blinding eye condition.

Global humanitarian outreach: Eversight helps establish eye banking, donation and transplantation in developing countries where millions suffer from preventable blindness. Pakistan has been a large area of focus. In 2020, Al Shifa Eye Bank in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, which was established partially due to Eversight’s leadership, recovered its first local donor tissues since the opening of the eye bank. Eversight worked with Al Shifa staff on optimizing donor family and recipient communications and helping them develop their first-ever public outreach campaign to promote cornea donation within the country.  

Education and training: Cornea transplant surgeons and clinical professionals rely on our ongoing training to ensure best patient outcomes. In 2021, Eversight provided training and education for 898 surgeons, fellows, residents, coordinators and other clinicians.  

Gift of Sight: This philanthropically funded charitable program partially or fully offsets the costs of corneal tissue transplants for under- and uninsured patients. In 2020, support for our Gift of Sight program allowed us to waive $204,480 in fees for recovering and preparing transplantable tissue that enabled 91 patients to receive sight-restoring surgeries they could not otherwise afford.  

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Eversight
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Eversight

Board of directors
as of 01/03/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kathy Zelenock

Dickinson Wright

Term: 2023 - 2025

Jarold A. Anderson

Gift of Hope Organ & Tissue Donor Network

Patty Jo Herndon

Michigan Donor Family Council

Danielle E. D'Arcy

Goldman Sachs

Jonathan H. Lass, M.D.

Case Western Reserve University

Shahzad I. Mian, M.D.

Kellogg Eye Center

Carolyn Welsh

NJ Sharing Network

Florence M. Johnston

Mahmoud Ghazzi, M.D., Ph.D.

Katheryne L. Zelenock

Dickinson Wright

Lorenzo Cervantes

Connecticut Eye Specialists

Carol Cunningham

Akron General Medical Center

Sandra Fletcher

United Way

Probi Kapur

AmerisourceBergen Corporation

Joseph Radka

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

Peter Wroblewski

The Mx Group

Diane Hollingsworth

Eversight

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/1/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability