GREATER FLINT ARTS COUNCIL

We Grow The Arts!

Flint, MI   |  www.greaterflintartscouncil.org

Mission

For 53 years, Greater Flint Arts Council (GFAC) has advocated for governmental arts funding, offered programs and services designed to engage the community in creative processes, supported the work of Michigan artists, developed sustainability in arts agencies throughout Genesee County and bordering communities, aided the development of new programs and new careers in the arts, increased awareness of the vast number of artistic/cultural offerings, enhanced arts education, stimulated local economic growth, showcased to the nation the beauty and livability of the greater Flint community and demonstrated how the arts can be a platform for social justice.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are the Community's source for arts and culture. We are supported by the Community. We exist to serve the Community. We value the participation of all Community Members.

Ruling year info

1977

President and Chief Executive Officer

Greg Fiedler

Chairperson, Board of Trustees

Thomas Webber

Main address

816 S Saginaw St

Flint, MI 48502 USA

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EIN

38-2156116

NTEE code info

(Arts Council/Agency) (A26)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Arts Incubator

We serve as Genesee County’s arts / cultural incubator. GFAC support services for artists and arts organizations include consulting in career development, program development, strategic planning, funding, organizational development/ sustainability, marketing and partnership development. All GFAC programming is done in partnership with local agencies, businesses and media (support materials). More than 1,500 volunteers work with us annually to accomplish an impressive portfolio of events and services. We normally have under our wing more than two dozen young artists of various disciplines who produce their own events. Many of these productions are paired with character building and civic engagement activities. Through arts incubator, GFAC is able to provide artists and small arts organizations funding, space for meetings, performances, rehearsals, office space, phones, a mailing address and more. Normally, more than 120 events are booked in the GFAC gallery by other organizations or individuals annually. The use of our facility by others is currently suspended due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.
We receive close to 5,000 requests annually for information and referrals via email, phone and social media. Topics of inquiry include locations of art, music and theatre classes for youth, dates and times of events, local artists seeking services and arts agencies seeking funding.
Another incubator program, GFAC founded the Parade of Festivals in 1999. This program was created to boost the economy of our downtown during its renovation. It offers incubator funds to begin new festivals, long term support for free festivals and a marketing package which includes regional media and a brochure that is designed for displays and the highway welcome centers throughout Michigan. In 1999, it began with 7 local festivals and has grown. GFAC was involved in the incubation of many of the participating festivals, including Flint Restaurant Week, DROP Fest, Alley Fest and the Downtown Sound Festival. We have received a number of requests to help with future events and plan to continue working with local artists who want to produce them. Additionally, this program gives support to existing festivals including Flint Pride, Goodstock, 80’s In the Hole, Heritage & Harmony, and Flint Hispanic Festival. This program was suspended in 2020 due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. We anticipate being able to revive this program with adjustments for 2021.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Entertainment Venue of the Year 2018

Flint/Genesee Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Americans for the Arts 2021

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to increase artistic expression in our community by engaging members to be creators and audience.

Support services to artists.

Support services to arts agencies.

Support services to arts educators.

Mass marketing to the public to inform of opportunities to be both creators and audience.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All residents of Genesee County, Michigan

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, social media and cultural planning,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, our High School Art Teachers informed us that their students would not be able to exhibit in our gallery in April, 2020 as they have done for over 30 years. We had some communication with our graphic designer, a local artist, and came up with a solution. We used digital images of the student work and created an online exhibit at our website.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our culture of accepting feedback goes as far back as the early 1980's when Greater Flint Arts Council hosted the "Where's Art?" Conferences. We have been driven by the expressed needs of the community for so many years, we can not identify a time when a "shift" occurred. *When local film makers approached us to start a local film festival we produced a festival with their guidance. *When African American Artists expressed they were excluded in many venues, we not only gave them an annual exhibition in our gallery, but assured them they could show their work during other months. *When the Middle Eastern Artists (Caldeans) approached us for an exhibition in our gallery, we produced, with their guidance an exhibition every couple of years at their convenience. *Also for the LGBTQ artists

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

GREATER FLINT ARTS COUNCIL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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GREATER FLINT ARTS COUNCIL

Board of directors
as of 7/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Thomas Webber

Franklin Benefit Solutions

Term: 2021 - 2023

Charles Boike

Attorney

Kimberly Cole

VP Sales & Engineering

James Draper

Engineer, Retired

Louis Hawkins

Community Relations Administrator, Retired

Gary Jones

Advertising Director / Musician

Laura McGuire

Artist, Self Employed

DeWaun Robinson

Nonprofit Administration

Diane Ruddy

Guidance Councelor, Montrose Community Schools, Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.