GOLD2024

The Zekelman Holocaust Center

aka Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus   |   Farmington Hills, MI   |  www.holocaustcenter.org

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Mission

Our mission is to engage, educate and empower by remembering the Holocaust.

Ruling year info

1982

Chief Executive Officer

Rabbi Eli Mayerfeld

Main address

28123 Orchard Lake Rd

Farmington Hills, MI 48334 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-2402635

NTEE code info

History Museums (A54)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Museum & Museum Activities (A50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus (HMC) is a 55,000 square foot museum and library archive in Farmington Hills. We teach more than 65,000 people each year about the senseless murder of millions, and why each of us must respect and stand up for the rights of others if we are to prevent future discrimination, hate crimes and genocide. Our exhibits feature artifacts, text panels, photos, video testimonies and many artworks ranging from the representative to the abstract. Art is an essential medium we use to convey challenging subject matter such as the magnitude of the tragedy, man’s inhumanity to man and the banality of evil. Paintings, sculptures, photography and films are on display in both our permanent and temporary exhibit galleries.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Holocaust Education

The Holocaust Memorial Center (dba Zekelman Holocaust Center, "The HC") is a 55,000 square foot museum and library archive in Farmington Hills. We serve more than 100,000 people each year about the senseless murder of millions, and why each of us must respect and stand up for the rights of others if we are to prevent future discrimination, hate crimes and genocide. More than half of our visitors participate in a guided tour of the museum, often followed by a climactic, live presentation by a local Holocaust survivor. Museum visitors who do not participate in the docent-guided tour usually explore the museum with their families or attend on- or off-site programming we present. Our program presenters are typically authors, university professors, filmmakers, professional musicians, Holocaust survivors, or artists whose works we display. Our Library Archive is an important resource for academics, the media and families researching their heritage.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average price of field trip tickets

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Student groups $3, college & university groups $5, adult groups $6

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of competition entrants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Students, Adolescents

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Kappy Family Anne Frank Art & Writing Competition

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

449 Michigan teachers attended our Echoes & Reflections teacher training workshops

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average price for admission to exhibits (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of entities served by expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Teachers from 245 schools across the state attended our Echoes & Reflections teacher trainings

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

By 12/31/18, we had 1500 active memberships

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, 449 teachers from 245 schools across the state attended one of our 27 Echoes & Reflections teacher trainings

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The HMC hosted approximately 88 hours of unique programming in the form of lectures, community talks, films, and other special events.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Holocaust Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• Presentation of high-quality exhibits, tours, programs and materials to school/community/corporate groups, individuals and families;
• Building relationships with middle schools, high schools, universities, church/synagogue schools, and community groups to help us educate their students and constituents;
• Providing a meaningful work experience for staff and volunteers that will translate into greater effectiveness in carrying out our mission;
• Creation of future strategies for teaching the Holocaust in an era without witnesses; and
• Financial sustainability.

We constantly seek to update our museum so that it is relevant to today’s visitors, and so we have recently added several powerful, new exhibits. At the entrance to the museum, an authentic WW II-era boxcar provides our visitors with a dramatic and profound introduction to the Holocaust, recalling how innocent people were crammed into them for days without food or sanitation on their way to death camps. Our Anne Frank Tree Exhibit & Garden features a sapling from the tree located outside Anne Frank’s hiding place window that is described in her diary. Anne Frank’s diary is one of the most powerful memoirs of the Holocaust, so her story and spirit are unique tools to educate students. Our Genocide Exhibit helps visitors understand that genocide continues today, so action is still needed. Additional exhibits about the righteous individuals who resisted the Nazis or saved lives encourage visitors to become forces for positive change in their own lives.

We have recently upgraded our technology to improve our visitors’ comfort and experience. With our new audio tour-guide system, even when we have 200 students on simultaneous tours, each student can hear every word spoken by the docent. We also have added sound-control materials in our galleries to cut down on crosstalk between separate tours. Lastly, we have recently upgraded our computer system to Altru to improve our tour scheduling and tracking.

As a museum with a small staff, we must be creative in our outreach efforts. By partnering with many other community organizations, presenting diverse touring exhibitions, and offering special programs in a variety of artistic and cultural media, we attract new constituencies to our programs and encourage our core audience to access a broader array of artistic and cultural opportunities. For example, for our recent exhibit Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals, we partnered with the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), the ACLU, the Ruth Ellis Center, Affirmations, EMU, UM-Dearborn, the Jewish Community Center and the Jewish Gay Network. To make the museum accessible to underserved populations, students who visit with their schools are charged a token fee of only $3 or if they can’t afford that, we waive their fee and also offer them free transportation. Our admission fees for individual visitors are also affordable ($8/adults and $6/seniors and students), plus we offer a number of free days and programs. We offer free daily admission to all active duty military personnel, law enforcement officers and fire fighters.

More than half of our visitors participate in a guided tour of the museum, often followed by a climactic, live presentation by a local Holocaust survivor. Tours are guided by a corps of 85 docents who have undergone 6 months of extensive training and testing in history and pedagogy, and who are required to complete 3 continuing education credits per year. Museum visitors who do not participate in the docent-guided tour usually explore the museum with their families or attend on- or off-site programming we present. Our program presenters are typically authors, university professors, filmmakers, professional musicians, Holocaust survivors, or artists whose works we display.

We present programs and exhibits of the highest caliber that use the lessons of history to create a call to action, teaching visitors through the examples of those who risked their lives to save others, and asking our guests to react to contemporary challenges such as racism, intolerance, bullying and prejudice. All temporary exhibitions come from major or accredited museums.

Our Library Archive is an important resource for academics, the media and families researching their heritage. It documents the Holocaust by acquiring and cataloging books, archives, artifacts, audiovisuals, posters, oral histories, maps and a host of other special collections and materials. Admission and reference services are free to the public. Our vast collection includes one of the most extensive Memorial Book collections in the country and our Oral History Collection is the major Michigan survivor personal-narrative repository. In addition, two major international organizations, the Association of Child Holocaust Survivors and the Kindertransport Association have chosen us as the permanent repository of their archives.

In 2018, we offered a number of special exhibits and public programs. Some examples are Sifting through Ashes, showcasing the Holocaust-themed paintings, photography and sculpture of artist Bruce Gendelman; the True Wartime Escape, about the creators of Curious George and their escape from Nazi-occupied France during World War II; and Filming the Camps, exploring the video footage shot by British, Soviet, and American soldiers as they discovered the camps—which was used as testimony and evidence in the prosecution of Nazi war crimes. In 2019, we debuted the special exhibit, Attitudes and Actions: Where Prejudice Can Lead, contains three parts—Jehovah’s Witnesses: Faith Under Fire, Rwanda: Personal Images, and The Tragedy of War: Japanese American Internment. Public programs for 2019 included Lessons from the Rwandan Genocide with General Roméo Dallaire and Preventing Genocide: Rohingya Update featuring Adem Carroll, New York and United Nations Program Director for Burma Task Force, and John Ciorciari, Associate Professor and Director of University of Michigan’s Weiser Diplomacy center at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Our membership event featured a conversation with Derek Black, the subject of Eli Saslow's acclaimed book, Rising out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist.

Additionally, in March 2018, the HMC embarked on an initiative to provide Holocaust education training to Michigan’s 1,000 social studies teachers. Our goal is to impact each of Michigan’s 500,000 public high school students through the social studies teachers we train. As of February 2019, we have trained almost 500 teachers who will reach more than 50,000 students in the 2018-2019 school year. We also hosted the 2nd annual Kappy Family Anne Frank Art & Writing Competition. In 2018, we doubled the number of participating school districts and high school students over the 2017 entries. 2019 saw a similar increase.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

The Zekelman Holocaust Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Zekelman Holocaust Center

Board of directors
as of 05/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Steven Grant

Greater Detroit Area Health Council


Board co-chair

Mr. Gary Karp

Larry Kraft

Serta Restrokraft Mattress

Adam Grant

Lewis Floor & Home

Alan Zekelman

JMC Steel Group

Leo Eisenberg

The Mobile Medical Management Group

Steven Weisberg

Twarda Investments

Arthur J Weiss

Arthur J. Weiss & Associates

Nelson Hersh

Hersh-Beattie Orthodontics

Barbara Kappy

Birmingham Schools

Arie Leibovitz

Ari-el Enterprises

Charles Silow

Jewish Senior Life

Arthur A Weiss

Jaffe Raitt Heuer & Weiss

Lilly Jacobson

Children's Hospital of Michigan

Irvin Kappy

Henry Ford Medical Group

Edward Malinowski

Cardiologist

Spencer Patrich

Lautrec, Ltd.

David Propis

Congregation Shaarey Zedek

Sam Shamie

Shamie Dev Companies

Mindi K Fynke

EHIM

Kenneth Goss

Specialties Showroom

Alex Shiffman

Attorney

Betty Chu

Doctor

Tamara Gorosh

Retired Attorney

Anna Gottlieb

Doctor

Bernie Kent

Investment Advisor

David Kramer

Elaine Serling

Singer/Songwriter/Author/RN

Sherry Shanbom

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/05/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.