Human Services

Child & Family Services of Northwestern Michigan, Inc.

Support in times of crisis, challenge, and life transition.

aka CFS   |   Traverse City, MI   |  http://www.cfsnwmi.org

Mission

To support the safety and well-being of those we serve in times of crisis, challenge, and life transition. Since 1937, CFS has provided foster care and adoption services to northern Michigan. Over the years, the organization has grown to respond to the community's changing needs, adding counseling and behavioral health services, supervised visitation and exchange, intensive family preservation, and more to its roster of programs. Our child welfare, counseling, and shelter programs are accredited by CARF International, assuring the more than 1,600 individuals, businesses, and organizations who contributed to our work last year of our commitment to clinical, administrative, and fiscal excellence.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Gina Aranki

Main address

3785 Veterans Dr

Traverse City, MI 49684 USA

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EIN

38-2534222

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Family Services (P40)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CFS is committed to being at the forefront of issues facing our neighbors today. CFS utilizes a trauma-focused lense in all programming to best meet the needs of those we serve. We serve our community through offices in Traverse City, Harbor Springs, and Gaylord, and serve children, adults, and families across northwestern Michigan. Since opening in 1937, we have provided foster care and adoption services to our region. Over the years, we have grown to respond to our communities changing needs, adding counseling, supervised visitation and exchange, intensive family preservation, and more to our roster of programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care

While family reunification in a safe home is always preferred, abused or neglected children may beremoved from their home by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. CFS works with MDHHS to find homes for children, to provide treatment and support, and to resolve any issues that have made their homes unsafe. In FY2019, 168 children were placed in CFS foster homes. 33 of those children were adopted. 4 children were placed in a guardianship, and 17 children returned home. 56 of these children remained in care for the entire year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Caregivers

When a new permanent living situation is required for abused and neglected children, CFS helps connect children with prospective adoptive parents throughout northern Michigan. 72 Forever Families were created through adoption in FY2019.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Parents

CFS offers counseling to children, youth, adults, families, and couples on a variety of issues. Where appropriate, our counselors utilize a trauma-informed approach to treat our clients, as well as other evidence-based models of treatment. We also offer tele-health counseling in order to help our clients heal on their terms. In FY2019, CFS provided 2901 counseling sessions to the community. We saw 167 new clients in 2019 and had an average of 95 clients per month.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Child & Family Services’ Safe Haven Supervised Visitation and Exchange program provides a safe, supportive place that prevents continued trauma to battered mothers and their children that occurs – all too frequently – during post-separation child visits and exchanges.

Whether the need is supervised parenting time, reunification with an absent parent, or safe, conflict-free child exchanges, children deserve to be safe at all times and should never be in the middle of – or witness to – conflict between their parents.

Supervised visits are monitored by specially trained staff who physically sit in the visit room with the child(ren) and their parent or observe through a one-way mirror observation window while listening to everything that happens in the visit room through a highly sensitive microphone and speaker system. Entrances to all visit rooms are either connected to or immediately adjacent to the observation rooms, allowing Safe Haven monitors to enter the room immediately to intervene if there are any concerns for the emotional or physical safety of the child(ren). Safe child exchanges ensure that children transition between parents for parenting time without the child witnessing any arguments or verbal, physical, or sexual abuse – which can be a frequent worry when one parent has a history of abuse towards the other parent.

Safe Haven prevents any contact between the parents leading up to, during, or following the visit or exchange. Safe Haven staff take care of all communication between parents with regard to scheduling/rescheduling visits or exchanges and all communications with regard to the children (who is sick, who is taking medication, who needs a nap, when they last ate or a had a diaper change, etc.). Separate entrances and staggered arrival and departure times ensure no visual or verbal contact occurs between parents while at our building. For both visits and exchanges, the offending parent must arrive at our center at least 15 minutes before the visit or exchange is scheduled to occur. With the offending parent inside, we can ensure that the at-risk parent and child will be not be subjected to stalking, verbal, physical, or sexual assaults when they arrive for the exchange. Once the visit or exchange occurs, parent departure times are staggered to ensure that the offending parent cannot make contact with the at-risk parent.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Wraparound is an intensive family preservation program that "wraps" a family in coordinated community services to assure that the child can stay at home. CFS’ Wraparound Program provides community-based support and individualized planning for children with severe emotional and behavioral disorders (SED), and their families. Wraparound helps connect families with a community network of support that bring hope and a sense of belonging. 14 families were strengthened through support from the Wraparound program in FY2019.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Intensive services, counseling, and support for women experiencing an unplanned pregnancy. The program includes 24/7 access, no waiting, and ongoing support during and after pregnancy to ensure the safety and well-being of all involved. CFS counselors travel to their clients.

Population(s) Served
Females
Males

Pete’s Place Youth Shelter is the area’s first and only youth shelter. Pete's Place opened to give our community’s teens a safe place to go when things got rough. Pete's Place can provide a safe place to go while youth try to work things out at home or figure out what's next. Our shelter is voluntary and free (financial need is never asked) for teens without a safe place to stay. Temporary and long-term opportunities are available.

Pete’s Place provides: 24 hour access to emergency shelter and crisis intervention; gateway services like food, clothing, and hygiene items; travel throughout our extensive service area; assessments of all youth served; coordinated case management that includes counseling, including substance abuse prevention services, and links to all needed resources. We assure that youth’s educational needs are met, reunite youth with their families whenever possible, create aftercare plans, and follow up with youth we have served.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

When Third Level merged with CFS in 2014, we added a wealth of expertise and experience in community education, especially in suicide prevention and crisis intervention. CFS offers safeTALK, ASIST, and trainings customized to each group’s needs. Some examples of training topics include: Understanding Suicide as a Public Health Concern, De-escalation of Agitated Individuals Recognizing & Responding to Suicidal People, and Active Listening.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Third Level Youth Services offers youth ages 12-20 alternative solutions for sorting out life’s ongoing challenges. Our outreach workers help youth deal with conflict at home, find temporary or long term housing, and provide ongoing counseling. Our counselors work with anyone who has run away, has threatened to run away, is in need of protection, may be at risk of homelessness, or is experiencing family conflict. 45 teens and young adults received support from youth services programming in FY2019.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

CFS’ Trauma Assessment and Treatment Center assesses children aged 2-18 and provides treatment to people of all ages. The Center uses a trans-disciplinary team to help anyone working with a child processing trauma, using intervention tools needed to help the child increase resilience, improve functioning, and reach their full potential. 50 trauma assessments were completed in FY2019. Our CTAC has received overwhelming praise for the difference they are making in children’s lives – as well as the lives of those around them.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Behavioral Health - 3 Year Accreditation 2013

Affiliations & memberships

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Counseling

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of foster care children placed with a family that were formally adopted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related Program

Adoption Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of licensed foster families as a result of the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related Program

Foster Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children in foster care who have stable placements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related Program

Foster Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our Mission: Our services support the safety and well-being of children, youth, adults, and families in times of crisis, challenge, and life transition. Our Strategic Plan Goals: Goal 1: To be at the leading edge in changing lives for the better through prevention, intervention, and collaboration. Goal 2: To strengthen and stabilize our funding base through diversification of funding sources. View our entire strategic plan at www.cfsnwmi.org/about

To achieve our mission and goals, we offer a wide range of programs which respond to our community's changing needs. We provide the most efficient, effective, and collaborative services, using evidence-based models of treatment and a trauma-informed approach, when appropriate. CFS directly serves over 33,000 individuals annually. This figure does not include the countless numbers we touch indirectly through community education, improved attendance and focus in school, reduced problem behaviors, and through our hundreds of community partners.<br/><br/>Our dedication to continuous quality improvement practices guides CFS' operations, performance, and achievement. It allows for the establishment of goals, the development of methods to obtain them, and provides the structure to determine effectiveness and the measurement of progress toward them. The underlying tenet of CQI is that there will always be opportunity for improvement. There is no such thing as perfection in the course of Continuous Quality Improvement. By nature, it is a circular process with repeating procedures. This repetition, together with evaluation by, communication with, and involvement of interested parties, forms the technique applied at CFS in order to continuously improve organizational performance.<br/><br/>View our entire strategic plan including strategies and goals at www.cfsnwmi.org/about

CFS collaborates extensively in all aspects of our work and recognizes that our partners are key to our success. Staff regularly attend collaborative meetings, make presentations, and conduct other activities to inform the community about CFS' services. CFS always leverages long-standing partnerships with area organizations, businesses, and friends to ensure the best possible services available. CFS has a very successful development effort that helps to support programs and operations through grant writing, donor relations, volunteer coordination, database management, and special events. The CFS board treasurer supervises the fiscal affairs of CFS and ensures the audit of books and records by an independent public accountant annually. CFS has a finance committee composed of the board treasurer, the board president, the CEO, and the CFO, in addition to other directors and trustees. The finance committee submits reports to the board and calls an annual audit meeting. In addition, CFS finances are published in an annual report. Our child welfare, counseling, and shelter programs are accredited by CARF, assuring the more than 1,600 individuals, businesses, and organizations who contributed to our work last year of our commitment to clinical, administrative, and fiscal excellence. CFS employs over 100 staff and utilizes volunteers and interns to assist in providing services and events to our community. In 2018, 520 volunteers contributed 7820 hours of services (up by 767 hours and 25 volunteers from 2017).

Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) is the philosophy that guides CFS operations, performance, and achievement. It allows for the establishment of goals, the development of methods to obtain them, and provides the structure to determine effectiveness and measure progress towards them. The underlying tenet of CQI is that there will always be opportunity for improvement. There is no such thing as perfection. By nature, it is a circular process with repeating procedures. This repetition, together with evaluation by, communication with, and involvement of interested parties, forms the technique applied at CFS in order to continuously improve organizational performance. CFS provides opportunities for all stakeholders to participate in the CQI process. These include surveys of consumers, referral sources, staff, foster parents, and volunteers, long and short term planning, defining and evaluating service outcomes, involvement with advisory groups, and periodic focus or task planning groups. Employees and Directors of the Board are entreated to not only provide input and feedback to CQI teams and team members, but to join a team and fundamentally contribute to the agency's practice of, assertion of, and commitment to CQI. CFS employs multiple groups or teams to implement its CQI system. Three tiers of teams provide Management, Oversight, and Review. The review tier is subdivided into Case Record Review, Administrative Review, and Clinical Review Teams. Responsibilities and activities of the CQI Teams are as follows: The Management Team approves corrective action plans, reviews and approves CQI documents, disseminates CQI findings to stakeholders, and guides strategic plan team and approves the strategic plan. The Oversight Team collects and analyzes data from Review Teams, generates quarterly and annual reports, recommends new CQI procedures, and monitors progress towards CQI goals. The Administrative Review Team reviews HR issues, accidents and environmental safety, staff grievances, and audits and evaluations. The Case Record Review Team reviews case records and the Clinical Review Team reviews service delivery issues, research involving clients, client grievances, risk management, program goals/outcomes, and audits/evaluations. CFS uses the “FADE" model of quality improvement to track progress. The FADE model has five broad steps: Focus, Analyze, Develop, Execute, Evaluate. The FADE model first determines the “Focus" of the project by defining the process that is to be analyzed. The “Analyze" step asks CFS to collect and analyze data that will allow staff to see where problems may arise or have arisen, and suggest possible solutions to the problem(s). CFS will then use its analysis to “Develop" a plan to overcome the challenges the project has encountered. CFS will then “Execute", or implement, the suggested changes and “Evaluate" the changes success or failures. This is a process that will be reviewed and tailored as needed.

CFS opened in 1937 as Dr. Mark Osterlin, founder of CFS, realized that abused and neglected children he saw in his pediatric medical practice needed a refuge. After being forced to return battered children to unsafe homes, Dr. Osterlin invited the Michigan Children's Aid Society to Traverse City and a branch was opened in 1937. Now operating as CFS, the work Dr. Osterlin started nearly 80 years ago continues today. In 2013, the Boards of Directors of Third Level Crisis Center and CFS met to discuss consolidating the organizations in response to changing conditions for nonprofit organizations. After great due diligence, the consolidation was finalized January 2014. Third Level Services are now located at the Veterans Drive location in order to consolidate expenses and maintain consistency among CFS programs. In 2018, a new program was implemented at CFS in response to a need in our community for a trained, educated, skilled workforce. YouthWork teaches youth and young adults ages 16-26 valuable job and life skills through learning-based environmental service projects and provides valuable services to their communities. The program helps youth and young adults gain an appreciation for the ecosystems that surround them and for the needs of their community. When participants plant a tree, remove invasive species, or clean up a beach, they learn that they have a voice and a stake in the future—their future. Participants recognize the impact they are making in their home community and celebrate the completion of work that is purposeful and locally relevant. In Fiscal Year 2017, CFS impacted the community with: 29,415 contacts fielded through Third Level Crisis Services 2,641 counseling sessions from licensed therapists 46 teens sheltered at Pete’s Place Youth Shelter 1686 supervised visits and safe child exchanges 493 received free legal advice from volunteer attorneys 105 children placed with loving foster families 111 teens received support through Youth Services 45 forever families created through adoption 34 families strengthened with Wraparound Intensive Family Preservation 35 comprehensive trauma assessments for children 40,000 hours of community services provided by YouthWork

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    A staff survey was created to evaluate the workplace culture. As a result, a committee was formed to ensure that CFS responds immediately to staff concerns and to promote positive work culture.

Financials

Child & Family Services of Northwestern Michigan, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Child & Family Services of Northwestern Michigan, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/4/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Diane Emling

Rick Summers

Fox Motors

Lisa Thomas

Northwestern Michigan College

Diane Emling

MDHHS/Northwestern Michigan College

Chris Mohrhardt

Incredible Mo's/Pangea's

Bob Needham

Huntington Bank

Ruth Gilmer

Kaylee Simerson

Chemical Bank

Rachel Wasserman

Hagerty Insurance

Patrick Lamb

TBA ISD

Krista Goldman

Lauren Pfeil

Jarboe & Pfeil, attorneys

Joanie Hazelton

Ferris State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/04/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

Child abuse, sexual abuse, foster care, adoption, counseling, neglect, Michigan, Traverse City, crisis, crisis line, suicide prevention, suicide, youth services, youth, families, legal help