PLATINUM2022

Gryphon Place

Helping those in conflict and crisis

aka GRYPHON PLACE   |   Kalamazoo, MI   |  www.gryphon.org

Mission

Our mission is to help people navigate conflict and crisis, foster resiliency, restore community, and support healing.

Ruling year info

1989

Chief Executive Officer

Maricela Alcala

Main address

3245 South 8th

Kalamazoo, MI 49009 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-2808685

NTEE code info

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

2-1-1

2-1-1 is an easy-to-remember, three-digit dialing code to reach information and referral services to health, human, and social service organizations. Wikipedia

2-1-1 can assist with a number of needs, ranging from after-school programs, housing and utility assistance, tax scheduling, food pantries, eviction diversion, mental health services, and more. We work with individuals to assess their needs, determine their options, and provide appropriate programs and services.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Any time a person feels overwhelmed by life stressors and needs someone to listen to them or needs to sort through their thoughts, the crisis line can be called. The line operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

269-381-HELP (local)
9-8-8 (national)

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Adolescents

Our suicide prevention trainings teach you how to recognize when someone is in crisis and connect them to help. We offer the following trianings:

QPR: Just like CPR, QPR is an emergency response to someone in crisis and can save lives. This training teaches how to Question, Persuade and Refer someone who may be suicidal thoughts.

safeTALK: safeTALK prepares anyone 15 or older to become a suicide-alert helper. The course trains participants to Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe.

ASIST: ASIST is the most in-depth training and features powerful audiovisuals, discussions, and simulations. LivingWorks ASIST trainees provide life-saving interventions.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

Twice a month, we offer a drop-in support group for those who have lost a loved one to suicide. This support group provides connection and fellowship for suicide loss survivors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

Gryphon Place and United Way of South Central Michigan have joined together in partnership to bring hundreds of regional volunteer opportunities and agency information together onto one easy-to-use platform.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Critical incident stress management (CISM) provides support for those who have experienced traumatic events. It can be implemented with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities to encourage recovery and return to regular life rhythms.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our youth suicide prevention program provides middle and high-school-aged youth with safe and appropriate lifesaving information, including positive coping skills for stress, information about mental health, how to recognize when a person is in crisis, and what to do if someone is having thoughts of suicide.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Restorative Practice is an emerging social science that studies how to strengthen relationships between individuals as well as social connections within communities. When problems do occur, Restorative Practices provide opportunities to address concerns and solve problems, and when there is wrongdoing, play an active role in addressing the wrong and making things right. Restorative practices can be utilized to improve schools, workplaces, community groups, and personal relationships.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Crisis Line

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Gatekeeper Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Regional Volunteer Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of cases mediated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Restorative Practices

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Crisis and conflict affects people of all ages, gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and socio-economic status. We serve all people.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As a result of community feedback, Gryphon Place is exploring the option of building a second location in order to provide walk-in services and be more accessible to the populations we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Gryphon Place strives to make informed decisions that include feedback from our community. This has allowed the power in decision making to shift to community members and recipients of Gryphon Place services. This allows us to best adjust and tailor the services to fit the needs of the population.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently,

Financials

Gryphon Place
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Gryphon Place

Board of directors
as of 12/27/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Amy Mervak, MPH

Amy Mervak

David Fatzinger

Tim Harding

Adam Brody

Stephanie Gillespe-Schrock

Kama Mitchell

Eddie Warr

Megan Taylor

Megan Redding

Amanda Crux

Nancy Turtle

Nkenge Bergan

Liliana Salas

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/13/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.