DROP-IN SELF-HELP CENTER

Self-Help, Awareness, Recovery, and Enrichment

aka SHARE Center   |   Battle Creek, MI   |  www.sharecenterbc.org

Mission

To provide a mutually-supportive, safe space with resources for the recovery of vulnerable people who are experiencing issues with homelessness, mental health, hunger, or addiction.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Robert Elchert

Main address

120 Grove St

Battle Creek, MI 49037 USA

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EIN

38-3022871

NTEE code info

(Human Service Organizations) (P20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The SHARE Center understands that there is often a connection between chronic homelessness, hunger, and issues with mental heath and addiction. Within these categories, there are usually numerous barriers that make it difficult to achieve and maintain financial and housing stability. For example, not having an ID and/or birth certificate has resulted in roughly half of the homeless population nationwide being ineligible for needed social services. Transportation, lack of food, and unresolved mental health and addiction issues are other barriers we commonly see that we can assist with.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Meal Program

The SHARE Center provides over 30,000 healthy and delicious meals to people and families in need each year. We serve free breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Veterans

Not having a birth certificate and/or a state ID can be a significant barrier to employment, education, banking, voting, social services, and several other necessities. The SHARE Center helps over 150 people each year overcome this barrier by providing alternative documentation that is accepted by our Secretary of State and local County Clerk. This helps people overcome both the documentation and financial obstacles they face when trying to get a birth certificate, divorce certificate, or state ID.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Veterans
Unemployed people

Our Employment and Benefits Coach provides assistance to people looking for work and people who cannot work, but need income from benefits. We use a trauma informed approach to ensure an individual is placed in an environment where they can thrive. For those who cannot work, we help them navigate the benefits system to maximize their food stamps, disability income, Medicaid, and other benefits.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Veterans

The SHARE Center offers several different support groups, a Life Skills class, and numerous enrichment activities that help people with their recovery. Our Bi-Polar Support Group meets every Saturday from 1 to 2:30pm. Our Narcotics Anonymous meetings are every Saturday from 3 - 4pm. Our Women's Group meets every Thursday at 1pm and Men's Group every Wednesday at 3pm. We also have a group for veteran's every Thursday at 4pm. Life Skills classes are offered every Tuesday at 2pm. We offer field trips, on site activities like gardening, yoga, art and music classes, and other enrichment activities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Veterans

Where we work

Awards

Public Policy Champion 2018

Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Self-employed people, Unemployed people, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

Community Meal Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities, Substance abusers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2020 was challenging due to COVID. We had to relocate and keep attendance to a minimum in order to continue meeting community needs.

Number of People Getting Assistance with Vital Records and State IDs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Self-employed people, Unemployed people, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

IDs and Vital Records

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This program was somewhat limited in 2020 due to COVID.

Number of New Consumers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, People with psychosocial disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 was challenging due to COVID and we had to reduce our daily population.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For our Consumers: Each individual will be empowered to achieve their highest level of recovery and optimal quality of life.

For our Organization: Foster innovative and sustainable approaches to streamline a network of support systems that bridges the gap between individuals, recovery, and peer services.

For our Community: Help create a community where all individuals are treated with respect, dignity, and are fully included in all aspects of social life.

The SHARE Center sees people who are at various places in their process of recovery from poor mental health and homelessness. Our strategy is to 1) make sure basic needs are being met. We offer meals, hygiene supplies, a safe and supportive environment, clothing, blankets, and other basic necessities. 2) Identify and address barriers. These include transportation, lack of ID, and unresolved issues with mental health and addiction. 3) Work towards stabilizing income and housing. Our Employment and Benefits Coach, Certified Peer Supports, and Recovery Coaches work with hard-to-employ individuals to find appropriate employment and/or navigate the system of benefits. We have a Street Outreach Team that works towards ensuring we are making every effort to reach out to various people and communities regardless of race, ethnicity, income, employment, sexual orientation, gender identity, abilities, or any other demographics.

As a drop-in facility, we are required to have 100% of our staff and board be current consumers of mental health services. Many of our staff members are former consumers of the SHARE Center. This allows us to have a unique perspective that ensures we are creating a non-judgmental, supportive, empathy-based environment. We have a dedicated staff that is trained in Mental Health CPR, CPR, trauma, de-escalation techniques, overdose assistance, and equity, diversity, and inclusion.

We also participate and lead several community collaborative efforts including the Homeless Coalition of Calhoun County, Hunger-Free Calhoun, the statewide ID Task Force, and the Housing Solutions Board. The gives us a perspective that allows us to identify and solve problems on a systemic level.

Finally, the SHARE Center is an active member of the Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness. Each year, we participate in their annual Legislative Action Day where we engage with our elected officials to educate them on important issues that impact our consumers.

The SHARE Center is a small organization with a big impact. In the last two years, we have increased our donor list and donations by over 200%. This has allowed us to grow the organization and add new programs that benefit our consumers. For example, two years ago, we added a Community Garden that gives our consumers the opportunity to engage in a therapeutic and educational activity. We have established new partnerships in the community that have produced a computer lab, a library, yoga classes, art classes, and other enrichment activities. We have also expanded our meal service to ensure that there is access to a healthy breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. More recently, we have been able to continue safely operating during COVID. Our staff and most or our consumers have been vaccinated and we are returning to normal operations.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people who are experiencing issues with mental health, addiction, food insecurity, and homelessness.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We started a wish list for our consumers to list the items they needed the most. At the top was backpacks and duffle bags, so we went out and secured 25 of each. We also heard from people that our signing in process for meals was somewhat intrusive. We have to collect demographic data for our funders, but we figured out a way to collect demographic data simply by asking their name.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As a drop-in facility, we are required to be peer led. By engaging with our consumers and allowing them to have meaningful input, we are able to create ownership for them and a mutual sense of trust. By actually acting upon the feedback we get, the consumers know they have a voice. Creating this trusting relationship allows us to more effectively serve our consumers while reassuring them they are genuinely cared for.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

DROP-IN SELF-HELP CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

DROP-IN SELF-HELP CENTER

Board of directors
as of 5/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tami Starks

Oaklawn Hospital

Sharon Sheddan

Summit Pointe

Karen Roebuck

Retired

Carol Wilbur

Transition Island Ministries

Mike Hoaglin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.