Samaritan Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valley Inc

Healing Mind, Body, Spirit

aka Samaritan, Inc.   |   MENASHA, WI   |  www.samaritanfoxvalley.com

Mission

We connect mind and spirit so individuals, families, organizations and communities thrive. We aim to ensure access to excellent mental health care to all through spiritually integrated counseling; Wellness screenings done at schools followed by case management to ensure families connect to services their kids need; and through preparing faith leaders of varied traditions to minister and support individuals and families dealing with mental health issues. Our services help restore people to health and wholeness.

Ruling year info

1980

Executive Director

Rosangela Berbert

Main address

1205 Province Ter.

MENASHA, WI 54952 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fox Valley Pastoral Counseling Center

Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valley

EIN

39-1214216

NTEE code info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Almost two decades ago the Surgeon General of the United States stated that “There is no health without mental health.” Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valley primary goal is to promote a healthier community through increasing access to mental health care. We offer outpatient counseling services to individuals and families; work with school districts to identify students in need of mental health care and connect them to services; equip faith leaders of diverse religious backgrounds to best minister to people dealing with mental health issues; and develop strong partnerships with local organizations also committed to creating conditions for a mentally healthier community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Counseling

We serve some 1,500 clients per year, including insured, uninsured and underinsured kids and adults.

We offer mental health counseling services provided by licensed professionals, in English, Spanish and Portuguese.


We offer counseling for people dealing also with substance abuse.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

We prevent youth suicide by offering school-based mental health check-ups to over 15,000 students in nine regional school systems each year. This service is free to the students.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

We collaborate with NAMI Fox Valley to equip professional and volunteer faith leaders to minister to mental health in their communities.

Population(s) Served
Interfaith groups

Where we work

Accreditations

Accredited by Solihten Institute 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Counseling

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of clients served was impacted by the pandemic. The average number of sessions per client went up reflecting the increased level of distress during these turbulent past couple of years.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Counseling

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Provide excellent counseling to all those in need, including those that are underinsured/uninsured who are turned away from services by many providers. Provide emotional wellness check-ups to youth in their schools and connect those in need to mental health services. Equip our faith leaders and faith communities to become stronger supporters and first responders for individuals dealing with mental health issues.
We aim to have outstanding mental wellness for all in our community and beyond, by providing compassionate and transformative services which promote belonging and enduring hope.

To ensure our organization can continue to make a lasting impact in promoting our community's mental wellness, we are working on the following 5 strategic aims:

1. Ensure Financial sustainability through developing, engaging, and maintaining a robust network for support; and through improved, data based business decisions. Our target is to establish an operating reserve of at least the equivalent to 3 months of operating expenses.

2. Grow community awareness of our organization so that we become first choice for individuals seeking mental health services, for other organizations seeking collaborators to develop responses to the mental health needs of the community, for professionals seeking to fully develop their professional career in meaningful way, and for philanthropic investors seeking to make a greater impact.

3. Attract, train, and retain qualified staff to meet the mental health needs of out community.

4. Develop and strengthen organizational leadership (staff/board) to ensure robust capacity for responsible business decisions based on ongoing strategic evaluation of the community's needs and our organization's resources and capabilities.

5. Explore, experiment with, and launch additional/innovative business opportunities and/or collaborations to meet the mental health needs of out community and beyond.

Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valleys has been in operation for nearly 50 years. During these 5 decades, the organization has proven its ability to be nimble to adapt to the changes this industry and the non-profit world has gone through so far.
Currently we count with a staff of 39 qualified professionals who staff departments:
1. Administration - we have been investing in improving our infrastructure to increase our capacity to manage our growing organization; investments in IT and having a committed and qualified staff, made us able to quickly adapt how we deliver our services to ensure continuity of care our counseling clients, school districts, and faith communities in the midst of a global pandemic.
2. Development and Communications - as the needs for our services continue to grow, we have made concentrated efforts to improve our capacity to communicate with customers, partners, and investors (donors, supporters). Attention to our social media resources, electronic news letter, and closer communication with our donors, has improved our fundraising results, attracted more clients, and elevated our brand. As the need for our services increase, so does the need for fundraising. Over 40% of our counseling clients are low income and need fee assistance to be able to afford services.
3. Counseling Program - all providers in our team are licensed through the state of Wisconsin to provide mental health and some are dually licensed to also provide Substance Abuse counseling. Our team is equipped to integrate the client's spirituality in the counseling process, according to client's desire; research shows that this practice improves clients' outcomes. Utilizing outcome measurement tools, our counselors track clients' progress towards treatment goals, providing outcomes informed care. We offer language and culture competent counseling services to Spanish speaking individuals.
4. Wellness Screen Program - counting with a team of well trained case managers and clinicians, a network of over 40 providers ready to take referrals from our program, and solid collaborative work with school districts, the staff of this program has been offering mental wellness screening to over 15,000 students per year, and making referrals/connecting to services students who need further evaluation or care. This year, in partnership with a reputable software developer, we developed a new database tool for case management and reporting that made the program more agile and effective.
Through the years, we have developed strong collaborative relationships with several other organizations to expand, deepen, and strengthen our impact. We have MOUs with over 40 providers to support the wellness screen services; work closely with organizations like NAMI Fox Valley, Catalpa, Family Services, and others to ensure that we can mutually refer clients according to their needs; partner with 11 school districts (2019); and some 25 different faith communities.

- Demand for Samaritan’s counseling services increased by 18% in 2021 compared to the same period in 2020.
- In 2021 we provided over 11500 hours of mental health and substance abuse counseling to over 1,500 individuals.
- 94.5% of clients satisfied with their mental health services (client ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale)
- 94.5% of clients experiencing reduced symptoms as reported by the client (client ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale)

- Our school based mental wellness screening program reached out to 9,683 students during the 2020-21 school year: 3,747 in 6th-12th grade, 528 in K-5th grade

- Of the students who screened, 1,403 screened positive (flagging with a possible emotional health concern): 1,282 in 6th-12th grade, 121 in K-5th grade

- Of the students screened positive , 1,126 were referred for services: 1,020 in 6th -12th grade, 106 in K-5th grade



How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children, teens and adults, or all walks of life who seek care for mental health concerns. We work with individuals, families, and organizations (secular and religious). We provide mental health counseling to community members and also to students in 8 school sites. Students are served via mental wellness screenings and also counseling.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Improved intake process to simplify collection of initial client information. Added a new position (Clinical Intake Specialist) to expedite intakes for clients in crisis.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Samaritan Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valley Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Samaritan Samaritan Counseling Center of the Fox Valley Inc

Board of directors
as of 06/29/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kristin Manney

Oshkosh Corp

Term: 2013 - 2018


Board co-chair

Robin Schroeder

Gary Cao

Mary Beduhn

Gary Cebulski

Diane Haase

Ivy Wendland

Amy Henselin

Lauri Asbury

Carla Rabe

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability