Combat Blindness International, Inc.

Restoring sight. Empowering people.

aka Combat Blindness International, CBI   |   Madison, WI   |  www.combatblindness.org

Mission

Combat Blindness International (CBI) is a non-profit health organization incorporated in Wisconsin, USA. CBI eliminates preventable blindness worldwide by providing sustainable, equitable solutions for sight through partnerships and innovation.

Ruling year info

1986

Founder and Chief Visionary Officer

Dr. Suresh Chandra

Main address

PO Box 5332

Madison, WI 53705 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Combat Blindness Foundation

EIN

39-1531546

NTEE code info

Eye Diseases, Blindness and Vision Impairments (G41)

Community Health Systems (E21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Combat Blindness International (CBI) eliminates preventable blindness worldwide by providing sustainable, equitable solutions for sight through partnerships and innovation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Elimination/Prevention

Combat Blindness International accomplishes our mission via two major facets: taking actions to eliminate preventable blindness and visual impairment & building the capacity of each country to serve their population.

Elimination/Prevention:
Surgical Intervention
School Screening
Providing Medical Supplies (consumables)
Medical Trips

Population(s) Served
Adults

Combat Blindness International accomplishes our mission via two major facets: taking actions to eliminate preventable blindness and visual impairment & building the capacity of each country to serve their population.

Building Capacity:
Personnel Training
Facility Construction
Ophthalmic Education
Consultation
Providing Medical Equipment

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to healthcare

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Elimination/Prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of women who are entering the healthcare workforce.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Within the next 3 years, Combat Blindness International (CBI) wishes to make a major impact on restoring sight to the less fortunate in low-income countries through:

Increasing the number of men and women we screen and treat for cataracts and other eye conditions; increasing the number of children we screen and treat for refractive errors and eye conditions; and increasing the number of young women we can educate to become ophthalmic technicians and nurses.

CBI is and has targeted these efforts in India, Kenya, Mali, Namibia, Gambia, Nigeria, Botswana, South Africa, Brazil, Paraguay, Lebanon, Myanmar, and the United States.

CBI's strategy for accomplishing our goals is two-fold: work with partner clinics and hospital staff in developing countries to establish their needs and targeting donations from individuals in the United States to fulfill these needs in order to provide a sustainable and innovative solution to end avoidable blindness in the world.

Combat Blindness International (CBI) has partnered with hospitals, clinics and staff in low-income countries from five to thirty years. CBI is impressed with these organizations in regards to the care they give to the individuals they treat as well as their strategic and innovative thinking in order to make their work sustainable. These hospitals are not only an asset but also a pride of CBI's. These individuals are the hands and feet of the work we do.

CBI has also developed a core group of passionate and influential individuals to join the board of Combat Blindness International. These individuals work to assure that CBI reaches its goals as well as spreading the amazing work of CBI to their spheres of influence.

CBI has a core group of staff and volunteers that serve to ensure the organizations success.

This year, Combat Blindness International (CBI) is celebrating 37 years of service. In this time, CBI has screened more that 2.6 million men, women and children and supported nearly 372,000 cataract surgeries in 15 countries and on 4 continents. CBI has supported the education of over 500 young women to become ophthalmic technicians and nurses, and supported the building of 2 surgical centers in rural India. Finally, in the early 90’s Combat Blindness International was one of three NGOs to support the building of an intraocular lens and suture factory in Madurai, India, called Aurolab. Today, Aurolab provides intraocular lenses and sutures at cost to NGOs, including CBI, in 120 countries.

Over the next 3 years, we would like to expand our adult and pediatric eye programs to other countries in South America and Africa. In addition, we want to grow the ophthalmic technician/nurse program so that it may be replicated in other countries.

Financials

Combat Blindness International, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Combat Blindness International, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/09/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gordon Derzon

Michael Altaweel

University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Gordon Derzon

University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics

Suresh Chandra

University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Reena Chandra Rajpal

Combat Blindness International

Anant Baliga

Symphony Corporation

Peter Holm

Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic

Choton Basu

University of Wisconsin - Whitewater

Amy Murray

Glaukos Corporation

Sean Lynch

Andrew Thompson

The Capital Group

Yasmin Bradfield

University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/17/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.