Boys and Girls Club of the Twin Cities

Great Futures Start Here

aka Boys & Girls Clubs of the Twin Cities   |   St. Paul, MN   |  www.boysandgirls.org

Mission

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Twin Cities is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.

Ruling year info

2000

CEO

Ms. Terryl Brumm

Main address

690 Jackson Street

St. Paul, MN 55130 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-0842657

NTEE code info

Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined) (O23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to Generation Next, only 24% of Twin Cities students receiving free/reduced-price lunch are reading proficiently by third grade. American Educational Research Association studies show that a student who is unable to read at grade level by third grade is four times less likely to graduate by age 19 than a child who does read proficiently by that time. Similarly, a student in poverty who does not read proficiently by third grade is 13 times less likely to graduate on time than their wealthier peer. Children who experience adversity without consistent support from adults are more likely to adopt unhealthy behaviors. The University of Minnesota’s 2015 study of BGCTC members confirms why the Clubs are so needed in the communities we serve: 86% of members receive free/reduced-price lunch; 46% receive food stamps; 29% switch school districts at least once per year; and 10% are homeless. Club members can be affected by behavior/academic issues and dysfunctional family structures.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Academic Success

The Academic Success strategy prepares young people to become lifelong learners and do well in school, providing youth opportunities for educational enhancement, career exploration, and augmented learning in literacy, finance, arts, and technology. Core programs include: Power Hour (homework help and tutoring for ages 5-18), Literacy Program (reading program and literacy enrichment for K-3), Numeracy Program (math enrichment for grades 4-6), STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math enrichment for ages 5-18), The Arts (studio and performing arts for ages 5-18), Goals for Graduation (academic goal setting for ages 6-15), and Teen Pathways field-based learning experiences for teens as they prepare to graduate high school, including Money Matters (financial literacy for ages 13-18) and Career Launch/Job Ready! (job skills/job search techniques and career exploration and mentoring for ages 13-18).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Good Character & Leadership strategy inspires youth to be engaged by providing character, leadership, and service learning opportunities to Club members. Programs coach youth to develop planning and decision-making skills by supporting and influencing their Club and community. Core programs include: Torch Club (small group leadership and service club for ages 11-13), Keystone Club (leadership development and community service club for ages 14-18), FOX Sports North (FSN) All-Stars (Club participation, positive behavior, and good sportsmanship incentives program for ages 8-13), Youth of the Year (BGCTC’s premier recognition program, celebrating the extraordinary achievements of Club teens), and UPS Road Code, a partnership between The UPS Foundation and BGCA providing a free-to-attend driver’s education program teaching teenagers safe driving practices.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Healthy Lifestyles strategy develops young people’s capacity to live healthfully by educating youth about fitness, nutrition and smart health decisions. Activities focus on instilling positive conflict resolution techniques, encouraging positive behaviors, setting personal goals, and building resistance skills that nurture and strengthen kids’ minds and bodies. Core programs include: Passport to Manhood (promotes and teaches responsibility to boys ages 8-17), Skills Mastery and Resilience Training (SMART) Girls (small-group health and fitness education and self-esteem enhancement program for girls ages 5-18, presented in three age groups), Kids Feeding Kids (nutrition program, cooking classes, and gardening activities for ages 5-18), Triple Play (health & wellness initiative for ages 6-18 focusing on physical activity, good nutrition, and healthy relationships), Voyageur (residential camp and environmental education program for ages 6-18), and Sports (recreation and sports leagues for ages 6-18).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Teen Pathways, a facet of our Academic Success programming, prepares at-risk youth and teens (ages 13-18) for a successful future, whether that is college or a career. Teen Pathways serves 400 teens annually and focuses on Self-Discovery for 7th and 8th graders, Exploring Community for 9th and 10th graders, and Identifying a Plan for the Future for 11th and 12th graders. Each age track includes activities in eight developmental areas:
1. Service: service/mentoring to Club and community, service learning accreditation
2. Leadership: leadership clubs and council/committee leadership opportunities
3. Youth Voice: weekly current events, public speaking, mock trial, debate
4. Healthy Mind, Body, and Soul: holistic approach to a culture of wellness, positive conflict resolution techniques, and goal setting
5. School Success: academic goal setting, homework help, ACT/SAT prep
6. Planning for a Future: career exploration, career visits, financial literacy, workforce readiness, college visits, job/internship placements, and bridge mentoring
7. Creative Expression: writing, performing and visual arts, digital music, audio, and video production
8. 21st Century Skill Building: STEM skills enrichment and IT certifications

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is to provide a high quality Club experience that assures success is within reach of every young person who enters our doors, with all members on track to graduate from high school with a plan for the future, demonstrating good character and citizenship, and living a healthy lifestyle. Programs are designed to intervene early to keep youth on a pathway to success. Goals are as follows:
• Increase school engagement and performance while helping members prepare for college, military, or trade school
• Increase technology knowledge/computer literacy skills through STEM programming
• Increase appreciation for the arts
• Improve financial literacy skills
• Enhance work skills/help teens secure meaningful work experience
• Develop leadership attributes and skills
• Help teens gain an understanding of civic responsibility and volunteerism
• Enhance nutrition through meal delivery and cooking classes
• Coach youth to make positive choices leading toward a healthy lifestyle

To achieve our mission and goals, BGCTC maintains the Five Key Elements of Youth Development:
1) A safe, positive environment where kids feel they belong
2) Fun and exciting age-appropriate activities
3) Trained professional mentors who are well-equipped to build supportive relationships with Club members
4) High expectations in diverse experiences/opportunities that challenge youth to learn new skills and develop a positive self-concept
5) Emphasize positive reinforcement, praise, and recognition of youth achievement

We offer nationally recognized programs in three “pillars of success” outcome areas that closely align with the developmental needs of the youth we serve: Academic Success, Good Character & Leadership, and Healthy Lifestyles. Programs are driven by the research-based Clover Model of youth development that highlights four essential social and emotional learning elements needed for youth to thrive, learn, and develop: Active Engagement, Assertiveness, Belonging, and Reflection.

BGCTC has been meeting the needs of at-risk youth since 1926. BGCTC’s 79 staff members, many of whom have dedicated their careers to our youth, provide consistent guidance while delivering high-yield, outcome-driven programs. No other youth development program in our community offers the breadth of programming BGCTC delivers for ages 5-18. Programs are delivered in inner city neighborhood facilities dedicated to youth activities.

An important resource for BGCTC is our dedicated team of 1,200 volunteers. Volunteers mentor youth in programs and activities, and introduce our teens to industries and companies around the Twin Cities. Additionally, our affiliation with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA), the nation’s oldest and largest youth development organization, allows BGCTC to maintain the highest standards of practice and continuously adapt to meet the changing needs of youth, with access to resources including program development, staff training, and some pass-through funding.

In FY18, our dedicated team of 84 staff members and 1,200 volunteers delivered programs to 8,398 unduplicated Twin Cities youth. This includes youth who participated in Club events, activities, or Voyageur programming.

In our Academic Success programs, 94% of students who received literacy instruction from November to May made positive gains in cumulative test scores. 733 youth participated in STEM activities; 274 teens were trained in job skills through Teen Pathways; and 176 Club seniors graduated from high school, up 65% over the previous year. In Good Character & Leadership programming, 62% of youth and teens surveyed volunteered in their local Club and/or in their community at least once a month. In Healthy Lifestyles programming, BGCTC provided 157,722 healthy meals and snacks to Club members; 1,069 youth participated in sports leagues; and 60% of Club members ages 9 and older reported getting at least one hour of physical activity five or more days per week.

Financials

Boys and Girls Club of the Twin Cities
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Boys and Girls Club of the Twin Cities

Board of directors
as of 9/16/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Judy Shoulak

Retired, Buffalo Wild Wings

Term: 2019 - 2021

Andrew Grey

US Bank

Chad Faul

Bremer Bank

Jim Franklin

Retired, Ecolab

Judy Shoulak

Retired, Buffalo Wild Wings

Kevin Berg

Asian Foods

Todd Phelps

Stinson Leonard Street LLP

Suzanne Dowd-Zeller

Allianz

Dan Kueppers

Midwest Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

Tom Schnack

Retired, Ecolab

Jason Lipinsky

Enterprise Fleet Management

Paul Berg

Sunrise Banks

Rob Loftus

MSP Commercial

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data