American Board of Urology Inc

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA   |  http://www.abu.org

Mission

The mission of the American Board of Urology is to act for the benefit of the public by establishing and maintaining standards of certification for urologists, working with certified urologists to achieve life long learning to insure the delivery of high quality, safe and ethical urologic care.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Secretary

J. Brantley Thrasher MD

Main address

600 PETER JEFFERSON PARKWAY

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22911 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-0857968

NTEE code info

Professional Societies, Associations (G03)

Consumer Protection and Safety (W90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The quality of medical education varied extensively in the early 20th century as recognized standards were limited. The ABU was founded in 1934 and incorporated in 1935. The Board’s objective is to identify, for the public’s knowledge and benefit, those urologists who have satisfied the Board’s criteria for certification and recertification and to indicate that at the time of examination the urologist has completed certain training requirements and has demonstrated appropriate knowledge and competence for the care of patients. By defining standards and practices, the Board is an imperative force in the continuing improvement of graduate medical education and in elevating the standards of urologic practice.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Certification

The purpose of awarding certification to individuals who meet the qualifications of The American Board of Urology is to assure the public that an individual has: (a) received appropriate training, and (b) has a level of urologic knowledge to practice safe and effective urology. The American Board of Urology strives to provide the urologic community with an examination process which is relevant and fair to all who take it.

Certification includes all domains of urology, including but not limited to pediatric urology, endourology, female urology, andrology, oncology, urolithiasis, and general urology. All certified urologists are trained to evaluate and treat all patients with urological disorders.

All US chief residents who have completed their training and residency requirements may apply for admission to the certification process. Canadian and international medical graduates may be eligible to apply if they have satisfied the training and residency requirements.

Applicants approved by the Board to enter the certification process must successfully complete a Qualifying (Part 1) Examination. After meeting certain specific criteria including unrestricted medical licensure, assessment of clinical practice through practice logs, acceptable peer review, and the 16-month practice requirement in a single community, the applicant must successfully complete the oral Certifying (Part 2) Examination to become certified.

Certification is valid for a period of ten years, subject to Life Long Learning.

Candidates have six years from the end of residency to complete the components of the certification process to become a Diplomate. An applicant will have no more than three attempts to pass the Qualifying (Part 1) Examination and no more than three attempts to pass the Certifying (Part 2) Examination. Applicants who have not successfully completed the certification process within six years of completion of their urology residency or who have failed either the Qualifying (Part 1) Examination or Certifying (Part 2) Examination three times must repeat and successfully complete the urology portion of an ACGME accredited urology residency program in order to re-enter the certification process.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of successful Qualifying (Part 1) examinees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

On average, approximately 90% of first-time examinees pass the examination.

Number of successful Certifying (Part 2) examinees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of successful PSC examinees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of successful FPMRS examinees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The FPMRS subspecialty certification examination is a jointly sponsored assessment. Results include urologists and OBGYN/'s with the exception of 2019.

Number of successful Recertification (LLL) applicants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Bands of one standard error of measurement above the pass point down to the lowest score receive a conditional pass.

Number of LLL participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Diplomates have four years to complete all components of Level 1.

Number of Website Visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To lead in ensuring the public trust in the practice of Urology by establishing innovative, comprehensive, transparent, and better processes for physician evaluation.

The ABU is committed to a set of medical professional foundational values:

1. Staying current with changes in medical practice through lifelong learning.
2. Regularly assessing medical knowledge, judgment, and skills.
3. Practicing safely and avoiding harm.
4. Improving patients' health and well-being.
5. Constantly improving communication with and care of patients.
6. Incorporating the values and preferences of patients in the delivery of care.

The ABU has been very active toward our goal of weaving relevant, efficient and effective educational activities into our evolving process of Life Long Learning. Over the past year, we have actively engaged our Diplomates to assist in improving LLL. We continue to incorporate many changes to make this process more relevant to individual practice while maintaining our certification standards.

We continue our ongoing dialogue to improve the experience for physicians, in the most efficient manner possible, while fulfilling our solemn obligation to the public.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

American Board of Urology Inc
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

American Board of Urology Inc

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. David Joseph

Children's of Alabama

Term: 2019 - 2020


Board co-chair

Dr. Hunter Wessells

University of Washington Department of Urology

Term: 2019 - 2020

Roger Dmochowski, MD

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Eila Skinner, MD

Stanford

Christopher Amling, MD

Oregon Health & Science University

David Bock, MD

KC Urology

Douglas Husmann, MD

Mayo Rochester

Gary Lemack, MD

UT Southwestern

James McKiernan, MD

Columbia University

Joel Nelson, MD

University of Pittsburgh

Martha Terris, MD

Augusta University

James Wolf, Jr, MD

The University of Texas Austin

Stephen Nakada, MD

The University of Wisconsin

Michael Ritchey, MD

Phoenix Children's

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/30/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/30/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.