Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

WALK-IN COUNSELING CENTER INC

50 Years and 50 More

aka Walk-In

Minneapolis, MN

Mission

Our mission is the same today as it was in 1969: to provide free, easily accessible mental health counseling to people with urgent needs and few, if any, service options.

Notes from the Nonprofit

A note about our financials: All of Walk-In's services are provided by volunteers, so we have consistently reflected the value of their services in our financial reports (previously audits and more recently Final Financial Reports). In 2018 the value of their services was nearly $1M. However, the 990 documents only cash, which is much lower. So the 990 financial report and the financial figures in the self-report will show different numbers for this reason. The percentage of overhead vs program looks very high in the 990, but is actually documented as 5%, 5%, and 90% respectively in the 2018 Final Financial Report. I'm happy to upload this formal Financial report should there be a place to do so.

Ruling Year

1973

Executive Director

Ms. Mary Weeks

Main Address

2421 Chicago Ave

Minneapolis, MN 55404 USA

Keywords

mental health, crisis intervention, volunteer professionals, counseling

EIN

41-0983461

 Number

6622073055

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Walk-in counseling clinics

Consultation and Training

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Percent clients who were satisfied or very satisfied with the services they received.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent clients who would refer a friend of loved one to Walk-In Counseling Center

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent volunteers who would recommend Walk-In Counseling Center as a place to volunteer.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our mission is the same today as it was in 1969: to provide free, easily accessible mental health counseling to people with urgent needs and few, if any, service options. 1) We help people stabilize during a time of crisis and resolve problems before they become so severe they require expensive hospitalization or police involvement, or result in tragedy or major life changes. 2) Our services ameliorate the impact of complex personal and family problems on people’s ability to cope and help them function more effectively in their families, jobs, school and community.

Professional volunteer clinicians provide quality mental health services to clients during scheduled walk-in clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN, and after the initial walk-in, by appointment for brief treatment (5-6 sessions). We do not diagnose (many of our clients already have multiple diagnoses). Instead we support the client in addressing the issues they are experiencing when they walk in the door. We ask our volunteers to use their skills and experience--including listening--to help the client address the issue(s) they bring. We do not direct them, but we support them on their journey. When a client is not "ready" to jump in, we reassure them that we are here when they are ready. (A client's readiness for change is critical for this work to be effective). If a client comes only once, we assume: 1) they got what they needed; 2) they are not ready to "jump in", since therapy can be challenging; 3) they began their journey with that first walk-in therapy session, and will continue when they are "ready".

Walk-In Counseling Center has provided these services for 50 years. The services are provided entirely by volunteers. Some 140 volunteers (masters and doctors of social work, psychology and marriage and family therapy, advanced graduate students in these fields, and lay volunteers) are active during the year, 85 at any time. The value of their volunteer services varies, but is around $1M a year. Walk-In has become a highly desirable place for volunteer clinicians to work. We have a very diverse client population who bring a broad range of issues/challenges. Local universities recommend Walk-In as a field placement for students, or as a place to volunteer at the end of their educational program. Many people who have or are close to retiring choose to "give back" at the end of their careers. The volunteers work in teams: several counselors, a team consultant and a receptionist. They see clients for 2 hours, then go into team consultation for another 2 hours to discuss and strategize the issues clients presented, and support each other. In 2019 Walk-In celebrated our 50 year anniversary of providing this service, and we look forward to 50 more!

Every year we do both a client and a volunteer satisfaction survey. Because we do not ask client's for identification, it is impossible to track clients' progress, so we ask them for feedback instead. In 2018: 99% of those who participated in our survey (about 125 people) indicated they were satisfied or very satisfied with the services they received 95% would refer a loved one or friend 98% felt more hopeful as a result of coming to Walk-In Likewise, the service is entirely provided by volunteers, so their satisfaction is critical. In 2018, 98% indicated they would recommend Walk-In as a place to volunteer. Though Walk-In is much too small to do extensive research about the effectiveness of single session and walk-in services, others have. And some of those others based their services on that of Walk-In. We were the first (maybe second) in the world to offer free, anonymous, no-appointment-needed services by volunteer clinicians. We follow the work of other sister single session and brief treatment providers in Canada, Australia, Israel and other international locations. We let them do the research to prove that single session and brief treatment if effective--beyond what we hear from our clients.

Our annual client satisfaction survey indicates we're doing it right. We are available, accessible, non-intrusive, and free. That's what people need when they come here, and the client satisfaction survey indicates that we are providing what they need

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: paper surveys.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: our staff, our board, anyone who wants it, but most stakeholders don't..
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.
What significant change resulted from feedback
A client indicated that one of our locations is difficult to find and not on a bus line--something that many clients use regularly. That also relates to a relatively low client usage of that site (60% rather than 125% and 85% at two other sites). We must consider leaving this location and re-locating to one that is more accessible to clients.

External Reviews

Financials

WALK-IN COUNSELING CENTER INC

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/30/2019

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

No data