WALK-IN COUNSELING CENTER INC

50 Years and 50 More

aka Walk-In   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  http://walkin.org/

Mission

Our mission is the same today as it was in 1969: to provide free, easily accessible mental health counseling to people with urgent needs and few, if any, service options.

Notes from the nonprofit

A note about our financials: All of Walk-In's services are provided by volunteers, so we have consistently reflected the value of their services in our financial reports (previously audits and more recently Final Financial Assessment). In 2020 the value of their services was over $1M. However, the 990 documents only cash, which is much lower. So the 990 financial report and the financial figures in the self-report will show different numbers for this reason. The percentage of overhead vs program looks very high in the 990, but is actually documented as 5%, 5%, and 90% respectively in the 2019 Final Financial Report. I'm happy to upload this formal Financial Assessment should there be a place to do so.

Ruling year info

1973

Executive Director

Ms. Mary Weeks

Main address

2421 Chicago Ave

Minneapolis, MN 55404 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-0983461

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many, many people need mental health support and have no/little access to it. During this past pandemic year, things have changed rapidly: many people have lost jobs and benefits; the cost of insurance premiums, if available, can be prohibitive, and even if a person has insurance, the cost of co-pays is problematic. Likewise, some people, especially undocumented Spanish-speakers, hesitate to reach out or a not eligible since they cannot have insurance. Walk-In offers free services, with specialized language-specific therapy for Spanish and Hmong speakers, so none of the above issues are a problem.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Walk-in counseling clinics

Free, anonymous, no-appointment-needed counseling is available at 3 clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Services are provided by master and doctoral clinicians who volunteer their time and advanced clinical graduate students. Some 85 volunteers are active at any time; 140 during the year. Professional volunteer counselors have provided an estimated $28,000,000 worth of services over our 50 years of existence.

People present with depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, trauma, domestic violence, chemical abuse, relationship and family conflict, school and work issues, challenges of mental illness, etc. Clients begin through a walk-in clinic visit but may make further appointments with a counselor (e.g., up to about 10 visits, but longer if appropriate). The goal of our brief treatment model is to help the person stabilize during a difficult time, and gain skills that allow them to cope and function more effectively in their family, work and community.

Because we don't ask for names or proof of identity, people can remain anonymous if they choose to. . . of great benefit to people who need support during a difficult divorce or custody battle; have jobs that would be jeopardized if it was known they sought "mental health counseling"; are trying to leave a violent/abusive relationship; are undocumented, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Gary Schoener, M.Eq., LP, an expert in professional ethics and boundaries, provides clinical consultation and professional training to help ensure that practicing professionals understand the follow appropriate ethical standards for their practice. Those who have exercised poor judgment and are in trouble with their licensing board receive formal assessment and coaching to restore their licensure and their practice.

Work done at Walk-In Counseling Center in the 1970's began to reveal the issue of sexual abuse of client by therapist, now a commonly recognized problem in all helping professions. Walk-In published the seminal work in this area.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

MPA Trisha A. Stark Community Enhancement Award. 2020

Minnesota Psychological Association

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent clients who were satisfied or very satisfied with the services they received.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent clients who would refer a friend of loved one to Walk-In Counseling Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent volunteers who would recommend Walk-In Counseling Center as a place to volunteer.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Walk-in counseling clinics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is the same today as it was in 1969: to provide free, easily accessible mental health counseling to people with urgent needs and few, if any, service options.

1) We help people stabilize during a time of crisis and resolve problems before they become so severe they require expensive hospitalization or police involvement, or result in tragedy or major life changes.
2) Our services ameliorate the impact of complex personal and family problems on people’s ability to cope and help them function more effectively in their families, jobs, school and community.

Professional volunteer clinicians provide quality mental health services to clients during scheduled walk-in clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN, and after the initial walk-in, by appointment for brief treatment (5-6 or more sessions if needed).

We do not diagnose (many of our clients already have multiple diagnoses). Instead we support the client in addressing the issues they are experiencing when they access our services. We ask our volunteers to use their skills and experience--including listening--to help the client address the issue(s) they bring. We do not direct them, but we support them on their journey.

When a client is not "ready" to jump in, we reassure them that we are here when they are ready. (A client's readiness for change is critical for this work to be effective).

If a client comes only once, we assume: 1) they got what they needed; 2) they are not ready to "jump in", since therapy can be challenging; 3) they began their journey with that first walk-in therapy session, and will continue when they are "ready".

Walk-In Counseling Center has provided these services for 51 years. The services are provided entirely by volunteers. Some 140 volunteers (masters and doctors of social work, psychology and marriage and family therapy, advanced graduate students in these fields, and lay volunteers) are active during the year, 85 at any time. The value of their volunteer services varies, but is over $1M a year.

Walk-In has become a highly desirable place for volunteer clinicians to work. We have a very diverse client population who bring a broad range of issues/challenges. Local universities recommend Walk-In as a field placement for students, or as a place to volunteer at the end of their educational program. Likewise, many people who have retired or are close to retiring choose to "give back" at the end of their careers.

The volunteers work in teams: several counselors, a team consultant and a receptionist. They see clients for 2 hours, then go into team consultation for another 2 hours to discuss and strategize the issues clients presented, and to support each other.

Volunteers find Walk-In an excellent place to work. In our 2020 volunteer satisfaction survey, 100% indicated they would recommend Walk-In as a place to volunteer.

And in 2019 Walk-In celebrated our 50 year anniversary of providing this service, and we look forward to 50 more!

Our annual client satisfaction survey indicates we're doing it right. We are available, accessible, non-intrusive, and free. That's what people need when they come here, and the client satisfaction survey indicates that we are providing what they need

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Primarily adults who reach out for counseling support; people who have and can use a phone or computer, or can "walk-in" (also roll in if using a wheelchair for mobility) the door when we can return to in-person services.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic of 2020, and now in 2021, we went to a virtual (Zoom-based) phone and internet service to continue providing counseling to anyone who comes. Though this change was not precipitated by clients, it was mandated by elected officials and by our "other" clients, our volunteers who provide the service.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Anyone who wants it, but most stakeholders don't.,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our client satisfaction surveys are anonymous, so we never know who provides the feedback, so no change in relationship exists. However, we pay attention to the comments made by survey participants, and they are positive in regards to our services: free, anonymous, and no appointment needed.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Clients now have to go to our website.,

Financials

WALK-IN COUNSELING CENTER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WALK-IN COUNSELING CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 3/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Todd McVay

CEO

Term: 2020 - 2021

Cory Johnson

Salo, LLC

James Towns

Ramsey County Human Services

Michelle Purtle

Carver County Behavioral Health

Pat Layton

Retired Psychologist

Todd McVay

Minnwest Bank

Victoria Abbene

Regions Hospital

Kendra Popov

Make the Match

Holly Keller

Beeper Baby

Michele Vance

Retired Social Work

Glenn Hirsch

Retired Psychologist

Vicky Lee

Opus

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.