PLATINUM2024

Face to Face Health & Counseling Service, Inc.

Advancing economic and health equity for youth.

St. Paul, MN   |  http://www.face2face.org

Mission

Face to Face works to advance economic and health equity for youth while providing support, opportunities, and access to resources as they build on their strengths and achieve their aspirations.

Ruling year info

1974

Executive Director

Hanna Getachew-Kreusser

Main address

1165 Arcade Street

St. Paul, MN 55106 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-0986780

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Reproductive Health Care Facilities and Allied Services (E40)

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Face to Face has provided essential support for marginalized young people for over 50 years. In FY23, Face to Face served 3,239 youth ages 11-24 across all programs. We serve young people ages 14-24 who face challenges such as housing instability, poverty, histories of trauma, lack of preventive health care, mental health concerns, human trafficking, and more. Youth accessing services at Face to Face are among those who are facing the most disparities and inequities on their journey into adulthood. Across all program areas, 90% of the youth we work with are BIPOC, with the majority (59%) identifying as Black/African American. Eighty-seven percent of youth who access services at Face to Face have an income of 100% or below the Federal Poverty Guideline. Additionally, 15% of youth identified as LGBTQ; 15% shared having a disability; and 23% reported experiencing domestic violence; all of these numbers are likely underreported.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Medical Clinic

Face to Face's medical clinic provides a wide range of services, including physicals, medical care for illness and minor injury, pregnancy testing, birth control, emergency contraception, and STD/STI testing and treatment. We also have a prenatal care and pregnancy support program to support pregnant and parenting youth. Services are available to all youth ages 11-24. Our medical services operate in a low-barrier, reduced-to-no-cost model. We directly fill a gap in services for historically underserved populations who face barriers to accessing traditional health systems, and are often under or uninsured. We never turn anyone away for lack of ability to pay, and we assist clients with obtaining health insurance when possible

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults
At-risk youth

Our mental health services include outpatient, in-home, and walk-in mental health therapy for youth and their families. Our mental health services operate in a low-barrier, reduced-to-no-cost model. We directly fill a gap in services for historically underserved populations who face barriers to accessing traditional health systems, and are often under or uninsured. We never turn anyone away for lack of ability to pay, and we assist clients with obtaining health insurance when possible. Our mental health practitioners have training in multiple trauma-informed approaches such as Somatic Experiencing, Narrative Exposure Therapy, and as Certified Clinical Trauma Professionals. We also have a practitioner who specializes in alternative therapies including breathing work, massage, and empowerment self defense.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Face to Face's housing stability services include all of the services at our youth drop-in center, SafeZone, as well as street outreach and a transitional housing program. Our housing stability work is aimed at helping young people secure housing and about providing the support young people need to stay housed.
SafeZone’s basic needs services include shower and laundry facilities, hot meals and groceries, bus tokens, hygiene supplies, and clothing. We provide rental assistance services to help young people to maintain or secure housing. Our transitional living program provides rental subsidies, case management, and mental health support for young people for 24 months for 36 youth at a time.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Our education and employment program provides paid internships, job-readiness training, education assistance, and wraparound support so that young people can pursue their education, employment, and career aspirations. When youth participate in paid internships they build skills, explore interests, and build wealth.

Population(s) Served

Our youth justice program provides case management, mentorship, supportive services, and conflict resolution for young people who are justice-involved. Youth who have been arrested are referred to us by the Ramsey County Attorneys Office and other organizations. Youth work with case managers to resolve warrants, participate in community circles, and access resources to fulfill underlying needs. The program prevents youth from being incarcerated and helps them engage positively in their community and their own lives.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who received case management services through the clinic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Related Program

Medical Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes both medical and mental health visits.

Visits to our food pantry.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Related Program

Housing Stability

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Related Program

Mental Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who accessed our day shelter.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Homeless people

Related Program

Housing Stability

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We are seeing a sharp increase in youth accessing our day shelter, demonstrating an increased need in our community for basic needs support.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to advance economic and health equity for youth while providing support, opportunities, and access to resources as they build on their strengths and achieve their aspirations. Our vision is that all youth are valued for who they are and realize their potential.

Face to Face has provided essential support for marginalized young people for over 50 years. We started in 1972 as a volunteer-run walk-in crisis counseling and reproductive health clinic for youth. In 1994, at the request of the State of Minnesota and Ramsey County, we opened SafeZone, our day shelter for youth experiencing homelessness. Today we continue to support youth ages 11-24 through six core areas: 1) medical clinic, 2) mental health, 3) housing, 4) education and employment, 5) youth justice, and 6) community programs. All service areas include comprehensive, wraparound services with a relational approach. In our most recent fiscal year, we served 3,239 youth across all program areas.

Our approach is relational, trauma-informed, and rooted in evidence-based practice. Our youth-centered programs address the inequities youth face, combat systemic racism and other forms of oppression, and support youth as they pursue their aspirations despite the barriers they experience.

In all our services, we acknowledge that structural racism contributes to health and housing inequities in multiple ways. Because of this reality, we work to eliminate disparities around health, income, housing, and more through a wraparound approach.

Face to Face sees and addresses the disparities that exist for youth in our community at the root level. We recognize the impact of poverty, classism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, gender-based discrimination, social isolation, and past trauma on the youth we serve. Our successes are built on developing authentic, trusting relationships with youth. We take a positive youth development approach, focusing on the strengths of the young people we serve. We provide youth with support and access to the information and opportunities they need to overcome the barriers in their lives and achieve their goals. The voice of our youth is currently informing our decisions and leading our work against systemic racism.

Face to Face upholds the following strategies to acknowledge and respond to racism with the goal of creating a more just society:
As an organization, explicitly acknowledging race and racism as major factors in health
care, mental health, and homelessness.
Training staff on racism, how people are treated, and inequities and then holding them accountable.
Ensuring youth have health insurance, basic necessities, safe and empowering medical and mental health care, rental assistance, and access to education.
Removing barriers to appointments by providing necessary supports (e.g., transportation, interpreters, appointment reminders, etc.).
Addressing social determinants of health through case management.
Focusing on better understanding young women of colors experiences and empowering them in their own care and choices
Developing youth-led peer education opportunities.
Focusing on developing trusting relationships with youth who have historically experienced negative and traumatic events.
Learning to ask the right questions and listening to young peoples experiences during their medical and mental health journeys with Face to Face

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion are core values of Face to Face. We intentionally recruit and hire staff who reflect the population we serve.

Face to Face, along with other members of the Homeless Youth Collaborative, developed and tested "The Nine Evidence-Based Guiding Principles to Help Youth Overcome Homelessness." We utilize these principles beginning with the perspective that youth are on a journey; all of our interactions with youth are filtered through that journey perspective. This means we must be trauma-informed, non-judgmental, and work to reduce harm. By holding these principles, we can build a trusting relationship that allows us to focus on youths’ strengths and opportunities for positive development. Through all of this, we approach youth as whole beings through a youth-focused collaborative system of support.

Our guiding principles uphold that our work is:

● Journey Oriented: Interact with youth to help them understand the interconnectedness of
past, present, and future as they decide where they want to go and how to get there.

● Trauma-Informed: Recognize that most homeless youth have experienced trauma; build relationships, responses, and services on that knowledge.

● Non-Judgmental: Interact with youth without labeling or judging them on the basis of background, experiences, choices, or behaviors.

● Harm Reduction: Contain the effects of risky behavior in the short-term and seek to reduce its effects in the long-term.

● Trusting Youth-Adult Relationships: Build relationships by interacting with youth in an honest, dependable, authentic, caring, and supportive way.

● Strengths-Based: Start with and build upon the skills, strengths, and positive
characteristics of each youth.

● Positive Youth Development: Provide opportunities for youth to build a sense of
competency, usefulness, belonging, and power.

● Holistic: Engage youth in a manner that recognizes that mental, physical, spiritual, and social health are interconnected and interrelated.

● Collaboration: Establish a principles-based, youth-focused system of support that
integrates practices, procedures, and services within and across agencies, systems, and policies.

Face to Face has been serving marginalized youth since 1972 when the agency began as a walk-in crisis counseling and reproductive health clinic serving youth on St. Paul’s East Side. Programming grew to include a full adolescent medical clinic and mental health program.

In 1994, the State of Minnesota asked Face to Face to start a drop-in center to be a safe place for youth experiencing homelessness to get off the street and get connected with resources. The result, SafeZone, is still the only drop-in center in St. Paul for homeless youth. Today, Face to Face serves over 3,000 youth per year throughout our six core program areas.

Our long term vision is to increase our relevance and strengthen our sustainability so we can remain an essential safety net in our community. We conducted resource mapping, a community needs assessment and engaged Ramsey County in our strategic planning to identify gaps in our community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Face to Face Health & Counseling Service, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Face to Face Health & Counseling Service, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/21/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Peter Scott

Medtronic

Term: 2024 - 2026

Robert Siegfried

Retired, American Red Cross

Sofia Ali

Neighborhood HealthSource

Jeremy Ellison

St. Paul Police Department

Madeline Gragg

3M

Jannine Hébert

MSOP, MN Department of Human Services

Laverne McCartney Knighton

United Negro College Fund

Eugene Nichols

Retired, 3M

William Reynaga

Minnesota Court of Appeals

Meagan Phillips

Securian Financial

Diana Brown

Como High School

Thomas Kottke

Health Partners

Cathy Lambert

Ecolab

Shamsur "Ramond" Mahmud

3M

Rev. Dr. Edward Treat

Center of Addiction and Faith

Alan Thometz

KATEC LLC

Laura Whipple

Teladoc

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/25/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/26/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.