PLATINUM2022

CHURCHES UNITED IN MINISTRY

Food, Shelter, Dignity, Hope

aka CHUM   |   Duluth, MN   |  www.chumduluth.org

Mission

CHUM is people of faith working together to provide basic necessities, foster stable lives, and organize for a just and compassionate community.

Notes from the nonprofit

When CHUM was founded, it was assigned an NTEE number as a "professional ministerial alliance" instead of as a human services organization. While we were indeed created by a group of religious communications, we have never functioned as a professional ministerial alliance. The IRS does not have a procedure to change NTEE numbers, but we are discussing with them the importance of doing so in our case.

Ruling year info

1974

Executive Director

John Cole

Main address

102 W 2nd Street

Duluth, MN 55802 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-1227969

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CHUM is the primary safety net for people in Duluth, Minnesota who are experiencing homelessness, hunger, and lack of community support. CHUM operates Duluth’s emergency shelter where each night we welcome 80 guests in our main shelter and six families in our family shelter. About 1,000 people a year spend at least one night at CHUM. Our shelter staff help guests connect with housing, sobriety and mental health services, health care, and employment. Our Street Outreach program works with about 150 people living on the street. CHUM’s Food Shelf distributes over 300,000 pounds of food a year to people who lack enough food for their families. Each year, we receive about 6,500 visits to our Food Shelf. CHUM’s services at the Steve O’Neil Apartments are designed to help families with children who have experienced long-term or recurrent homelessness overcome the circumstances that led to homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CHUM Emergency Shelter and Drop-In Center

CHUM’s Emergency Shelter Program includes congregate (dorm-style) and family shelters. In 2021, 974 people (unduplicated) stayed in the congregate shelter and 22 families used the Family Shelter. About 150 people a day use our Drop-In Center. Housing advocates help people to identify and address specific barriers to obtaining and maintaining permanent housing. Stabilization services continue to be available to shelter guests following their move into permanent housing.

CHUM Center is the primary location where people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness can get help from CHUM, including assistance finding housing and employment, accessing a variety of public benefits, seeing a nurse, pick up the mail (both physical and e-mail), do their laundry, have a hot meal, socialize over games or conversations, and perhaps most importantly, find a warm and welcoming community where they can be safe, heard, and respected.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

CHUM operates one of Duluth's largest food shelf’s. The main location is at 120 N. First Avenue West, with an additional location at Our Savior's Lutheran Church in West Duluth. CHUM also operates an at-home food delivery service and mobile pantries across Duluth. Each year we distribute on average 8,016 five-day food packages (about 500,000 pounds of food). Our Food Shelf was client choice, meaning people can select the food they prefer, but with COVID, we have moved to a pre-packed box distribution. About 40% of the beneficiaries of the Food Shelf are children

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The goal of the CHUM Street Outreach Program is to connect homeless and precariously housed, high-contact repeat offenders to coordinated housing and social services and enhance the public perception of safety in downtown Duluth.

Objective 1: Improved coordinated community response and partnerships to address downtown blight and nuisance crime

Objective 2: Reduced police contacts with homeless and precariously housed high contact/repeat offenders

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

CHUM's Congregational Outreach and Advocacy Program includes the Gabriel Project (established by six Hillside congregations to provide cash assistance to those facing an emergency); faith-based organizing and advocacy at the state and local level; Expanding Horizons (an urban immersion experience to expose participants to the issues of poverty and opportunities for service and social justice work), and volunteer outreach and coordination for all of CHUM’s programs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

The Steve O'Neil Apartments provide 44 units of permanent supportive housing for families with children who have experienced long-term or recurrent homelessness. CHUM is the service provider for families here. Our goal is to break the cycle of family homelessness by fostering healthy, strong, and stable families, with a broad network of social connections, and empowered to reach their goals and dreams. We place a special emphasis on the well-being of the children. Our intention is to create a culturally diverse community that keeps the well-being of children and their families at the very center of community life. In the last few years since this program started, we have given families the resources they needed to begin to thrive and prosper in life.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

St. Francis Apartments (former Downtown Duluth Inn) is a 43-unit property designed to provide housing to single individuals, preferably the elderly, who have a history of homelessness and who meet the High Priority Homeless eligibility and screening requirements in St. Louis County’s Coordinated Entry system. Housing is offered to homeless individuals who are eligible for permanent supportive housing because of age, disabilities, and/or underlying health conditions.

32 of these units will be offered to people experiencing chronic homelessness who qualify for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) project-based permanent supportive housing (PSH) subsidy vouchers. The remaining 11 units are offered to those experiencing long-term homelessness who qualify for Housing with Support (HS) subsidies as per St. Louis County.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits 2014

Chamber of Commerce 2014

Combined Federal Campaign 2014

Food Resource Bank - Implementing Member 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

CHUM Emergency Shelter and Drop-In Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

This figure represents numbers of individuals who come to CHUM for Emergency Shelter each year.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

CHUM Emergency Shelter and Drop-In Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A "bed night" represents the number of occupied beds over the course of a year. A shelter like ours with 80 beds would count 80 "bed nights" for each night we were full.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

CHUM Emergency Shelter and Drop-In Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the people whom we help return to housing from CHUM Shelter. Others find housing with less support, these are the ones we know about.

Estimated dollar value of food donations distributed to community feedings programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CHUM Food Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

CHUM receives food donations to our Food Shelf, which we then distribute. This metric is calculated by the pounds donated times $1.72/lb in 2015 & 2016 and $1.62 for 2017. Rates set by Second Harvest

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CHUM Food Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

CHUM has made an effort to increase "healthy choices" at our Food Shelf. One metric of this is the number of pounds of produce we distribute each year. The 2016 number is for July - December.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CHUM’s Mission Statement is “People of faith, working together, to provide basic necessities, foster stable lives, and organize for a just and compassionate community.” Forty-two faith communities are members of CHUM. They provide CHUM with spiritual and financial support, as well as hundreds of volunteers to sustain our programs that serve over 8,000 people a year.

CHUM’s primary goals are:

1. To provide the most basic of human needs, food and shelter and welcome, to all those seeking assistance.

2. To foster stable lives through support services designed to help people achieve housing stability, healthier lives, and greater self-sufficiency.

3. To organize for a just and compassionate community by mobilizing volunteers to help provide for basic needs and support services and to advocate and organize for social policies that impact people who are marginalized and least represented where decisions are made.

Strategies for Shelter and Stabilization Services:

CHUM's Emergency Shelter and Family Shelter accommodate more than 1,000 people a year (adults and families with children), seven days a week, year-round. CHUM is one of few 24-hour emergency shelters in Minnesota. We use a "low barrier" approach, welcoming all who come, accommodating those under the influence, and for up to six guests with companion animals.

Drop-In Center (day shelter) serves about 125 people a day (in addition to shelter guests) and provides them with access to facilities (bathroom, shower, laundry, etc.) and support services to assist with housing, public benefits, medical and dental care, addiction recovery programs, and other supports.

Street Outreach targets about 150 people who are living on the street or in places unfit for human habitation, who are high-users of public systems. Outreach also works with people who will become homeless upon discharge from correctional or medical facilities.

Steve O’Neil Apartments provides permanent supportive housing for up to 44 families with children who have experienced homelessness. CHUM’s supportive services include Trauma-Informed intensive case management, Early Childhood Programming, and youth and family support.

Strategies for Distributive Justice:

CHUM’s Emergency Food Shelf is one of Duluth’s largest food shelf operations, serving the public five days a week in three different locations across our city. Last year, we distributed 297,087 pounds of food to 2,173 households (unduplicated). About 25% of our food shelf users are regular monthly visitors (the remaining 75% average three visits a year) and 37% of the beneficiaries are children.

Supplemental Support provides used household items to individuals and families moving from shelter to housing and our Backpack Program makes sure that students have what they need to start the school year. In 2018, in partnership with the Duluth School District, CHUM distributed 1,100 backpacks full of school supplies for grades K – 12.

Outreach and Advocacy: focusing on policies of inclusion and social justice, providing voice to those on the margins,

Congregational Outreach and Advocacy work unites people with diverse incomes, ethnic backgrounds, racial identities, and faith traditions to address policy and system changes that promote equity and inclusion.

CHUM Church provides inclusive worship and support for about 50 adults with developmental disabilities; most live in a congregate setting, where agencies and caregivers provide care.

CHUM’s Emergency Shelter is Duluth’s only shelter for adults experiencing homelessness and our Family Shelter is the only shelter for families who are homeless, but not fleeing domestic violence. Our Emergency Shelter is an 80-bed congregate shelter for adults; last year, we added 30 beds to be able meet increasing demand for beds. Our Family Shelter (located in the Steve O’Neil Apartments) has six apartments for families with children. Our policy is never to turn anyone away because of lack of space; we add sleeping pads on the floor in the congregate shelter if all beds are full. When the Family Shelter is full, we set up a separate room in the congregate shelter to accommodate families temporarily, until a more suitable shelter arrangement becomes available. In 2017, CHUM sheltered 1,061 people (906 single adults, 58 families, and 91 children).

CHUM’s Drop-In Center (day shelter) serves as the community’s living room for many who are homeless, as well as those experiencing the isolation of living in nearby adult care facilities for people with physical or mental disabilities or treatment centers for addiction. We typically see about 125 people a day (in addition to those who are staying at our shelter) who come in to get out of the weather, rest and eat a hot meal, use bathroom/shower/laundry facilities, and access our support services. CHUM’s staff (Social Worker, Housing Advocates, Street Outreach Worker, and Health and Wellness Coordinator) help clients access medical and dental care and assist people with applications for housing, health insurance, and public assistance programs (SNAP, WIC, MFIP, General Assistance, Emergency Assistance, and SS and SSDI).

Our Street Outreach Worker makes contact with who are living on the streets, in encampments, in cars, or other unfit living conditions. She also reaches out to people in detox centers, jails, or emergency rooms who will become homeless upon discharge and often drives hundreds of miles a week to cover the length and breadth of Duluth to meet with people who are homeless wherever they are staying. In addition, she shares responsibility for staffing the United Way 211 Homeless Outreach Hotline and we receive referrals from clients, other non-profit agencies, police, and affiliated churches.

CHUM’s Food Shelf is one of Duluth’s largest food shelf operations, serving the public five days a week in three different locations across our city. Our Food Shelf served 2,173 households (unduplicated) with one to sixteen members. An analysis of data year-over-year (2016 to 2017) revealed that the Food Shelf had a 12% increase in households served and an 18% increase in clients over the age of 65. A recent survey of visitors indicated that a majority spend one-half or more of their income on rent and they simply run out of money and then must decide whether to partially pay their rent or utilities or go without food.

CHUM is supported by volunteers and contributions from 43 faith communities.

Since 2011, CHUM has consistently provided shelter to more than 1,000 people each year. Some people seek out CHUM’s shelter more easily on their own, while others struggle with issues and barriers to staying in a shelter and continue to live on the streets. Almost two-thirds of the people coming into our shelter disclose having a recognized disability, almost half have a mental illness, and one-third struggle with addiction (including addiction to opioids).

In the same time span, we have consistently provided between 250,000 and 300,000 pounds of food to between 5,000 and 6,000 guests at our Food Shelf. Our Food Shelf was selected for the highly competitive "Super Shelf" program sponsored by the University of Minnesota in recognition of our client satisfaction and our success at increasing the amount of fresh fruits and vegetables we distribute through the Food Shelf (about 4,000 pounds a month).

We, along with other partners in the Homes for All Coalition, have been successful in advocating for bonding bills which last year provided $90 million for affordable housing. We made it easier for people on the Minnesota Family Investment Program ("welfare") to marry by assuring that their benefits are not immediately reduced because of marriage. We have advocated successfully to expand the Working Family Credit to adults age 21 - 25 without dependents, and we fought off attempts to reduce the renter's credit in MN. We have some pending victories in sight: increasing the MFIP allocation for the first time since 1986, expediting childcare assistance for families experiencing homelessness, and reducing the differential impact of fines and fees on families with low incomes.

In partnership with St. Luke's and Essentia Health, we have established the Health Care and Homelessness initiative to improve the quality and coordination of care, particularly at transfer of care. This initiative has resulted in improved communication between hospital social workers and CHUM. The Duluth Family Medicine Residents now hold regular hours at CHUM, and in partnership with the local Catholic Worker Community and First Covenant Church, we have established Duluth's first respite house for people who are discharged from the hospital with no place to go other than shelter.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

CHURCHES UNITED IN MINISTRY
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHURCHES UNITED IN MINISTRY

Board of directors
as of 08/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Patrice Critchley-Menor

Cathedral od Our Lady of the Rosary

Term: 2020 - 2023

Kathleen Hofer

St. Scholastica Monastery

Kathleen Axtell

Grace Lutheran Church

Loren Anderson-Bauer

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church

Noah Hobbs

Our Savior's Lutheran Church

Laurie O'Neil

At-Large

Robin Roeser

Concordia Lutheran Church

Robert Hoffman

College of Saint Scholastica-Campus Ministry

Tim Zager

First United Methodist Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data