PLATINUM2024

TUBMAN

Safety. Hope. Healing.

aka Harriet Tubman Center; Tubman Family Alliance; Chrysalis, A Center for Women; Family Violence Network, Eldercare Rights Alliance   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  www.tubman.org

Mission

Tubman's mission is to advance opportunities for change so that every person can experience safety, hope, and healing.

Ruling year info

1974

CEO

Jennifer Polzin

Main address

4432 Chicago Ave S

Minneapolis, MN 55407 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Family Violence Network

Tubman Family Alliance

Harriet Tubman Center

Chrysalis, A Center for Women

Eldercare Rights Alliance

EIN

41-1240048

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Relationship violence, exploitation, mental illness, and addiction remain far too common in the Twin Cities metro area—and are often accompanied by homelessness and poverty. All of these challenges disproportionately impact marginalized communities due to systemic discrimination and barriers to accessing services. The need for prevention, early intervention, and effective services is clear.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family violence emergency shelter

Tubman provides 130 beds of emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence, with additional beds for youth who are victims of or at risk for exploitation and trafficking. Residential programs include supportive services that include support groups, safety and goal planning, and connections to other community resources. Shelter is available for people of all ages and genders.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
At-risk youth

Legal services for victims of domestic violence and related crimes include criminal court advocacy, Orders for Protection, law clinics, pro bono legal representation, clinics on self-representation, and attorney referrals.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Tubman's mental and chemical health services include: chemical health (Rule 25) assessments; mental health therapy for individuals, couples or families; mental health assessments; therapy groups; a Relationship Violence Intervention Program for people who have been abusive; a Co-occurring Disorders outpatient program for women with both chemical dependency and mental health concerns; and Dialectical Behavior Therapy.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Substance abusers

Services for youth and young adults include youth safety plannings, violence prevention and intervention, support, outreach services, and leadership opportunities in both Tubman residential and community settings.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total served in one year across all programs offered at Tubman. This number is unduplicated, meaning a person may have used multiple services/programs but is only counted once.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes volunteers who contribute hours individually or as part of a group project.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of attorney volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mental and chemical health services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This number includes clients who accessed mental or chemical health assessment and/or treatment in our licensed clinic.

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family violence emergency shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Legal services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes Orders for Protection, court advocacy for victims of crime, legal clinics, pro bono advice and representation

Number of people who received presentations on healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Tubman’s vision represents the future we want for our clients and the wider community: Thriving people, healthy relationships, and peaceful communities. Tubman offers trauma-informed care for people to meet basic needs during crisis, work toward self-sufficiency, and maintain safety, hope, and personal stability in the face of life's challenges. Committed to addressing the root causes of family violence and instability, we advocate to improve how systems respond to victims of violence and exploitation.

The key strategic directions that guide our work are: 1) CLIENTS - provide streamlined access to exceptional, relevant services; 2) COMMUNITY - engage the community to take action; 3) CAPACITY - strengthen the agency’s infrastructure in order to better serve; and 4) CULTURE - invigorate organizational culture to sustain innovation, engagement, wellbeing and diversity. Tubman develops innovative services, shares resources, and strategically partners with complementary non-profits, government agencies, and community and faith-based organizations.

Established in 1974, Tubman provides family crisis and support services to people of all ages and all genders from diverse backgrounds. The agency was formed from the merger of Harriet Tubman Center, Family Violence Network, Chrysalis A Center for Women, and ElderCare Rights Alliance. Our Board of Directors includes business, community, and government leaders. Jennifer J. Polzin, Tubman’s Chief Executive Officer, has over 25 years’ experience working with our clients, volunteers, community members, and staff. She is a respected leader with demonstrated expertise in strategic planning, collaborations, and community engagement. With an annual budget of $9.8 million, 100+ staff FTEs, and over 800 volunteers and interns, Tubman will help lead the way to hope for over 25,000 women, men, and youth receiving direct services. Through our newsletters, website, and social media, thousands more will learn the information they need to get help or give help.

We are recognized for more than 40 years of innovative, collaborative service delivery. In the last year, we consolidated our services from three locations to two, without reducing domestic violence shelter beds or community-based services, in other to protect critical services in the years to come. By selling one building, we were able to reinvest in our two remaining locations, preserving our organizational sustainability and offering us greater flexibility to adapt, innovate, and invest in our staff and other necessary infrastructure to meet the evolving needs of our clients.

We developed a Rapid ReHousing program that includes building relationships with landlords and property managers while offering additional support services to tenants to help them stay housed and build upon their self-sufficiency while receiving short-term rental assistance. We also expanded our existing Safe Journeys transitional housing program for youth and young adult victims of violence and exploitation. These different models of housing continue our long history of providing safe, stable, supportive housing services.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, many of our services have adapted to remote-based or virtual offerings, including secure online support groups for people experiencing domestic violence, and moving to a model of telehealth for mental and chemical health services. Through cross-training and building efficiencies, our legal services team has increased its capacity to write Orders for Protection by 30 percent. We also launched client advisory groups to influence and improve our services, redesigned our shelter staffing to enhance outcomes, and continue working to strengthen our cultural competence and DEI work.

Our second bi-annual Employee Engagement Survey shows significant improvement in each of three key indices: Employee Engagement (+7%), Performance Enablement (+4%) and Work Well (+23%).

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

TUBMAN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

TUBMAN

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Donnie Brown

Minnesota Realtors Association

Jennifer Polzin

Tubman

Tommie Braddock

Venture Solutions

Jeffrey Bouslog

Fox Rothschild

Diane Gates

Allianz

Doug Underwood

McGladrey

Ramona Advani

Office of State Auditor

Jackie Ottoson

Community Leader

Jacob Colon

Community Leader

Junita Flowers

Junita's Jar

Jeffrey Justman

Faegre Baker Daniels

Paul Tillman

Oakdale Wesleyan-Methodist Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.