AchieveMpls

aka AchieveMpls   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  www.achievempls.org

Mission

AchieveMpls rallies community support and delivers best-in-class programming to inspire and equip Minneapolis and St. Paul youth for careers, college and life. Our vision is that our young people have full and equitable access to postsecondary education and career opportunities, creating a more just and vibrant community.

Notes from the nonprofit

We're proud of our Charities Review Council stamp of approval, our Charity Navigator rating, and our Philanthropedia ranking as a top nonprofit serving at-risk youth in Minnesota. Please feel free to contact us if you would like more information about our programs or you have any questions about our work.

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Danielle Grant

Main address

2829 University Ave. SE Ste. 850

Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-1425264

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Significant disparities existed in Minneapolis-Saint Paul even before the COVID-19 pandemic. There are double digit gaps between BIPOC and low-income residents and their white affluent counterparts in practically every measurable quality of life, including diploma and degree attainment, employment, poverty rate, and more. Many barriers create these disparities, one of the most important of which is access to opportunities, resources, and support to explore and plan for success after they earn their diploma. When a young person successfully navigates the transition from high school to postsecondary credentialing programs and/or the workforce on pathways aligned with their interest, their likelihood of attaining positive life outcomes (earning a living wage, career laddering, homeownership, etc.) increases dramatically.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Career & College Readiness

As a regional leader in career and college readiness, Achieve is the sole universal provider for two of the largest districts in Minnesota, annually providing 1:1 and group advising to 20,000 students attending 11 Minneapolis and eight (8) St. Paul public school campuses. We partner directly with school and district leadership to foster a future-oriented culture and plan and implement career and college readiness strategies. In partnership with corporate volunteers, we help young people understand occupational training, aligning academic and work interests, and career laddering and graduate prepared to take ownership of their future. BIPOC and low-income youth who work with our Coordinators enroll in postsecondary programs at 74% and 67% higher rates, respectively, than those who do not.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
Immigrants and migrants

Founded in 2003 in partnership with the City of Minneapolis, Step Up is the largest and most enduring youth workforce development program in our region, serving as a connection both to our young people seeking to build their resumes and social capital and employers endeavoring to reach the next generation of talent. Every year, we recruit, train, and place 1,400 Minneapolis youth (ages 14-21) facing significant barriers to economic opportunities in paid career experiences via internships with 200 top local employers and our new paid online Career Exploration Program. Internships last, on average, nine (9) weeks, 20-30 hours a week. Collectively, interns earn $2M+ to support themselves and their families, and most become eligible to earn academic credit. Every year, 70% of interns say their experience helped them make critical decisions about their future and 90% of employers say their interns made a valuable contribution to their workplace.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2013

Charities Review Council 2020

Awards

Local Educational Support for At-Risk Youth 2013

Philanthropedia Top Non-Profits

Best in Business: Nonprofit 2014

Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce

Nation's Top K12 Education Foundations 2016

Caruthers Institute

Affiliations & memberships

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students served with one-on-one career and college counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Career & College Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Every year we directly provide one-on-one career and college access and readiness services to 40% of all students. Note 2019 was interrupted by COVID-19 and our transition to distance learning.

Number of seniors applying for financial aid through the FAFSA or Minnesota Dream Act

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Career & College Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This year, we achieved a 49% FAFSA completion rate, exceeding our goal of 45%. Completion rates dropped across the country, likely from COVID.

Number of seniors served with one-on-one career and college counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Career & College Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

CCC Coordinators plan multiple check-ins with seniors throughout the year to advise them and verify that they are on track. Coordinators met with each senior on average 3-4 times throughout the year.

Number of seniors applying to a postsecondary program (2 and 4-year and certificate)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Career & College Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

By end of SY 20-21, 77% (1062) of college-intending MPS seniors applied to two or more institutions as this makes them much more likely to enroll the following fall.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Step Up

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Training focuses on core skills for securing a job (resume writing, interviewing, etc.), critical on-the-job skills (effective communications, collaboration, etc.), and industry-specific knowledge.

Number of clients placed in internships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Step Up

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Career-oriented internships last 9 weeks, 20-24 hours per week, pay local minimum wage, and are credit eligible. COVID-19 profoundly impacted this area of our work.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Unlike many internship programs, we require that supervisors complete orientation on working with the next generation and how to create high quality internship experiences.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Low-income people, Extremely poor people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Step Up

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Career Exploration Programming (CEP) is a paid, remote, multi-week enrichment training curriculum alternative to in-person internships.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Achieve reaches students early on in their high school years to introduce them to the full spectrum of college and career pathways and provide them with increasingly personalized advising, career exploration experiences, and resources that help them graduate prepared to take ownership of their future. We envision a future in which all our young people have full and equitable access to postsecondary education and career opportunities, creating a more just and vibrant community.

Our central goal is that all students:
- Develop a broad, yet thorough, knowledge of career and college pathways
- Build social capital and resumes through paid internships
- Attain graduation-ready milestones
- Leave high school prepared to successfully transition into postsecondary programs and/or the workforce on pathways to living wage careers

Our Career and College Initiative (CCI) is a continuum of school- and community-based postsecondary advising, career exploration, and experiential paid internship programming that provides students with the resources, support, and experiences they need to make informed decisions about their future and develop robust post-graduation plans that help them start on paths toward long-term financial independence.

CAREER & COLLEGE READINESS (CCR): As a regional leader in career and college readiness, Achieve is the sole universal provider for two of the largest districts in Minnesota, annually providing 1:1 and group advising to 20,000 Minneapolis and St. Paul public school students on 19 campuses. We partner directly with school and district leadership to foster a future-oriented culture and plan and implement career and college readiness strategies. Through direct counseling, our Coordinators help students develop a breadth and depth of awareness of career and postsecondary pathways and, as they progress through high school, align their educational interests, financial requirements, and vision of the future in which they achieve their own definition of success and leave high school on pathways toward engaged citizenship. We partner with districts, schools, local employers, and postsecondary and workforce institutions to do systems-level work, ensuring we are responsive to community needs and opportunities.

BIPOC and low-income youth who work with our Coordinators enroll in postsecondary programs at 74% and 67% higher rates, respectively, than those who do not. The services we make available for free to all students normally cost a family $3,000-$6,000 in the private market.

STEP UP: In partnership with the City of Minneapolis, we annually recruit, train, and place 1,400 Minneapolis youth, ages 14-21, facing significant barriers to economic opportunities, in paid internships with 200 local employers or in paid, remote, rigorous Career Exploration Programming. Internships last, on average, nine (9) weeks, 20-30 hours per week. Collectively, interns earn $2M to support themselves, their families, and their future education, and most become eligible to earn academic credit.

Step Up internships are high quality and take place in environments where students can work with professionals, learn key workplace skills, and completing robust, resume-building tasks. Internships give students early access to a network of support that provides much-needed social capital and work experience they can build upon. Moreover, through Step Up, youth build confidence in themselves and their abilities, hope for the future, and awareness of their place in and contributions to our community. Over 70% of Step Up interns say their experience helped them make critical decisions about their future plans and 90% of employers say their interns made a valuable contribution to their workplace and better prepared them to integrate the next generation workforce.

Achieve stands at the critical intersection of our public schools, private employers, postsecondary institutions, and the public sector, serving as a bridge between them and our young people. Historically, prestigious educational opportunities and high-wage, upwardly mobile career pathways were designed to benefit certain groups of people and exclude others, which still negatively impacts our students today. Our work puts students on more equitable pathways to meaningful, family-sustaining careers, particularly those young people who have been systemically excluded, such as BIPOC and low-income youth. Simultaneously, we serve as a critical connection between postsecondary institutions and students, and to employers who rely on a skilled workforce to ensure the continued strength of our local economy.

We recognize and value the expertise of our diverse staff and board that reflect the community we serve. Our 50-member staff is split between two direct service teams and a small administrative support staff. Our school-based Career & College Readiness Coordinators are full-time, direct-service professionals with backgrounds in counseling, social work, and college admissions; half are BIPOC and many are public school alumni. The Step Up team has a dual-service model with some members devoted to Youth Services and others to Employee Engagement so that they develop long-term relationships with both and a deep understanding of their needs and goals so that we can create high-quality, mutually-beneficial internship experiences. We purposefully recruit leaders who understands, and can best advocate for the needs of the communities we serve and can connect us to their networks to affect community-wide change. Our board consists of local leaders in public education, government, community, and private business, more than a third of whom are BIPOC and many are Achieve program alumni. Achieve is led by our President & CEO, Danielle Grant, a member of the Little Shell Ojibwe tribe, who has spent 20+ years working on racial equity and restorative justice in education.

Achieve’s leadership team serve as consultants and advisors to several regional planning committees. Our President & CEO is a member of the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors and the Minneapolis Federal Reserve’s Community Advisory Board. We have consulted several communities replicating our Step Up program model. Our CCR team members work with postsecondary institutions and present at local, regional, and national conferences on our advising model and use of data to improve student postsecondary outcomes. Program evaluation is led by our Manager of Monitoring and Evaluation (MME) who collaborates with program leadership and staff from the City of Minneapolis, MPS, and SPPS to monitor our progress and evaluate our impact. We use student surveys, application materials, interviews, focus groups, and other metrics to identify opportunities to improve our programming.

A handful of our examples of our long-term impact include:

1.) A third-party researcher calculated the return on investment of the CCR program to the greater community through students attaining higher-wage jobs and thus increasing their lifetime earnings, at $3.74 for every $1 invested.

2.) BIPOC and low-income youth who work with our Coordinators enroll in postsecondary programs at 74% and 67% higher rates, respectively, than those who do not.

3.) From SY18-19 to SY19-20, National Student Clearinghouse reports that national postsecondary enrollment rates dropped by 6.8%, but, predictably, the most vulnerable students were disproportionately impacted as low-income districts saw a drop of 10.7% and 9.4% for high-minority districts. While we saw similar trends at MPS with postsecondary enrollment rates falling, overall enrollment rates for MPS students was and still remains higher than national trends for schools with similar characteristics. MPS Class 2020’s enrollment rate is 6.7 percentage points higher than our peer low-income districts and 7.7 points higher than high-minority districts.

4.) According to a five-year longitudinal study, young people who participate in Step Up have higher attendance and are more likely to be on-track to graduate. A separate study found interns also experienced significant growth in Responsible Decision Making, Relationship Skills, and Social Awareness.

5.) We provide a connection to employers, many of whom were already struggling with a pre-pandemic labor shortage, to the next generation workforce. Simultaneously, we help employers prepare for the workforce of tomorrow through trainings, events, and panel discussions on cultural adaptation and responsive work environments.

RECENT SUCCESS: At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, we were fortunate to have the unique relationships, capacity, and expertise to rapidly transition to a remote service model for all of our major programming and ensure an uninterrupted continuance of support. Even though the last third of SY19-20 and first 80% of SY20-21 were conducted entirely remotely, we still managed to support students at a district-wide capacity. Overall, our Coordinators provided direct, 1:1 CCR advising to 69% of seniors and 39.5% of all students; through mass communications and group activities, we reached all students. Thanks to our Coordinators, 69% of seniors applied to college of whom 77% applied to 2+ programs. Additionally, 49% of seniors completed the FAFSA, exceeding the statewide average of 45% by 4 points.

During Summer 2020, 1,871 youth completed work readiness training, of whom 466 were placed in traditional paid internships with 60 employers and ~500 participated in paid Career Exploration Programming (CEP) for a total of 966, or about two thirds our pre-COVID capacity. In Summer 2021, 745 (+279) youth were placed in paid internships with 88 (+28) employers and 628 (+128) participated in CEP for a total of 1,373.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our programs serve slightly different but overlapping populations. Of the ~20,000 MPS and SPPS students reached through our school-based Career and College Readiness programming, roughly 70% are BIPOC and 60% are low-income. With a commitment to equity, we devote the most time and resources to support youth who are historically under-represented in career and college opportunities. All Step Up paid training and internship opportunities are reserved for students facing barriers to economic opportunities. Every year, roughly 90% of Step Up interns come from a low-income household and/or are youth of color, half are first- or second-generation immigrants, and a fifth live with physical or mental disabilities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email, Board, staff, and volunteer recruitment of program alumni,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    One of the most common requests we received from Step Up internship alumni was to offer opportunities for them to remain connected to employers through high-quality, resume-building jobs while earning their postsecondary credentials. In 2020, we successfully piloted a small cohort of Achieve College Interns (ACI). ACI training and internships are more rigorous and closely aligned with each participant’s career ambitions and desired daily and long-term working conditions, builds their resumes with meaningful accomplishments, and gives them access to networks and social capital they will need to make a smooth transition from postsecondary programs into full-time employment. We are now annually hosting ~50 interns, all of whom face significant barriers to economic opportunities.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Students are at the center of all we do. We purposefully solicit their feedback through surveys, focus groups, and 1:1 and small groups to inform our work and stay abreast of what students find meaningful. To meet their needs, we partner with individuals and institutions from all sectors. We work with district and campus leadership to strategize and deliver college access and readiness programming. Achieve collaborates with dozens of peer service providers to maximize our collective impact by delivering joint programming and directing students to the resources most appropriate to their needs. We engage directly with postsecondary institutions and employers to better understand what they can offer our young people and to advocate for our students by calling attention to unmet needs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

AchieveMpls
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AchieveMpls

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Hilary Marden-Resnik

Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer, UCare

Term: 2014 - 2023

Martin Abrams

Land O'Lakes

Jacob Frey

Mayor, City of Minneapolis; Ex-Officio Member

Michelle Grogg

Cargill

Dr. Abdul Omari

AMO Enterprise; Vice Chair

Rich Renikoff

Wells Fargo

Christopher Shaheen

Dorsey & Whitney LLP

Nelson Inz

Chair, MPS Board of Education; Ex-Officio Member

Krissi Carlson

US Bank

Scott Cummings

Accenture

Ed Graff

Superintendent, Minneapolis Public Schools; Ex-Officio Member

Honorable Martha Holton Dimick

Fourth Judicial District, State of MN

Velma Korbel

Dept of Civil Rights, City of Minneapolis

Brad Pederson

Maslon, LLP

Dara Rudick

Management HQ, LLC

Jeff Savage

Xcel Energy

John Stanoch

Mat Watson

Best Buy

Tom Holman

The Morning Foundation; AchieveMpls Board Chair

Danielle Grant

AchieveMpls; Ex-Officio Member

Anil Hurkadli

Thrivent Financial

Steve Liss

Elizabeth Stevens

St. Catherine University

Art Gardner, Jr.

Hillcrest Development

Tony Tolliver

Center for Economic Inclusion

Nick Hara

KPMG; Treasurer

Alvin Abraham

Dougherty Family College, University of St. Thomas

Kawaskii Bacon

Media Bridge Advertising

Fredrick Blocton

UpNet Technologies

Shamayne Braman

HealthPartners

John Conlin

Target

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/2/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/08/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.