PLATINUM2023

Can Do Canines

Our dogs fetch amazing things!

New Hope, MN   |  www.candocanines.org

Mission

Can Do Canines is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities by creating mutually beneficial partnerships with specially trained dogs. We envision a world in which everyone who needs and wants an assistance dog can have one. We place dogs in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Notes from the nonprofit

Assistance dogs and complete training are provided to our clients, free of charge.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Mr. Jeff Johnson

Main address

9440 Science Center Drive

New Hope, MN 55428 USA

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Formerly known as

Hearing and Service Dogs of Minnesota

EIN

41-1594165

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are working to eliminate the waiting list for people living with disabilities or children with autism who need and want an assistance dog.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Can Do Canines Assistance Dog Program

Can Do Canines serves individuals who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, physically disabled, living with a seizure disorder, diabetes with hypoglycemic unawareness, and children with autism, pairing them with dogs specially trained to alert them to important sounds or assist them in the activities of daily living. The assistance dogs are provided free of charge because very few of the clients served can afford the average cost of a dog, which is about $45,000. Assistance dogs can help by retrieving objects that are out of their partner's reach, pulling wheelchairs, opening and closing doors, turning light switches off and on, barking to indicate that help is needed, finding another person to help, assisting a person to walk by providing balance and counterbalance, and many other individual tasks as needed by a person with a disability. In 2023, our program plans to train and place 51 assistance dogs in our service area.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Awards

Distinquished Community Service Award 2008

ARC

Nonprofit Mission Award for Innovation to Alan Peters, Executive Director 1992

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

President's Award for our "Anything's Paws-able" Prison Puppy Raiser Program 2009

Minnesota Corrections Association

Animal Hall of Fame Award - "Lincoln" Autism Assist Dog 2009

Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association

Dog of the Year Award to "Oreo" a Hearing Assist Dog 2008

City of Minneapolis

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2005

Assistance Dogs International (ADI) 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of assistance dog teams certified

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Can Do Canines Assistance Dog Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Can Do Canines' overarching goal continues to be to help individuals living with a disability or children with autism live more independent lives through the use of specially trained assistance dogs. The only way we can lessen the wait time for people, though, is to train and place more assistance dogs. To do that, we need the support of dedicated volunteers and donors to continue providing these assistance dogs free of charge to people who need them.

Training an assistance dog is typically a 2-year process. These are the steps that are required to graduate a team (client and dog):

1. Puppies identified as potential assistance dogs live with volunteer Puppy Raiser families. For 12 to 18 months, Puppy Raisers open their homes to the puppies. They also make a commitment to attend classes once a month to begin basic skills training with the dog and introduce the dogs to different situations and people so they are socialized and comfortable in various public places.

2. At 1 year of age or so, potential assistance dogs receive a medical examination and are certified against skeletal or genetic problems. Those that do not pass the medical exam or have behavioral problems (e.g. nervous in public) are placed for adoption in a loving home.

3. Upon successful completion of training with the foster family, the dog is returned to the Can Do Canines' kennels to work with professional trainers to complete the training. After further evaluation the dog is matched with a client and that team (client and dog) training begins. This phase takes between 2 and 4 months. It occurs at both Can Do Canines and at the client's home. Once completed, everyone celebrates at a graduation ceremony.

Before a placement is made, the individual applicant and family is interviewed and screened. Each potential client must document that they have the physical and financial capability to take full responsibility for the dog after it is certified as an assistance dog.

Can Do Canines has found that its donor base expands as more certified assistance dogs work in the community, as well as puppies-in-training. Individuals, businesses and civic groups see the benefits of an assistance dog and begin to support the programs. Can Do Canines has multiple fundraising opportunities that attract new donors, and works to retain donors and bring them to a higher level of giving. Typically, direct program expenses represent 83 percent of the annual budget.

Can Do Canines is a leader and innovator in training assistance dogs that help people with different disabilities. The organization currently trains and places assistance dogs for people with hearing impairment, mobility issues, seizure disorders, type 1 diabetes with hypoglycemic unawareness, and children with autism. Can Do Canines is the only organization in Minnesota that provides Autism Assist Dogs, as well as Hearing Assist Dogs and Diabetes Assist Dogs.

As more assistance dogs are seen in the community providing help and support, the greater the demand is for an assistance dog. While Can Do Canines has increased the number of assistance dogs trained and placed each year, the wait list continues to grow. There is a wait list for every type of assistance dog provided. Currently, more than 160 individuals are waiting to be interviewed, are in the interview process, or are waiting for the right match with an assistance dog in-training. The wait list for our Autism Assist Dogs is growing at an especially fast pace. There are now more than 130 families on the 'pre-application' list (pre-wait list) for an Autism Assist Dog.

Financials

Can Do Canines
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Can Do Canines

Board of directors
as of 11/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ross Thorfinnson

Ross Thorfinnson

Spectrum Financial Group, Inc.

Mitch Peterson

Retired from TPI Hospitality

Judy Sharken Simon

Daily Work

Steven Novotny

Arux Software

Dianne Ward

Retired Attorney

Kathryn Hoy

UBS Financial Services

Beth Klingelhofer

Corptax

Connie Roehrich

Retired Prison Warden

Andrew Brust

Sunrise Banks

Scott Thomas-Forss

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

Rebeca Sharpe

Best Buy

Drew Wineland

Wells Fargo

Matthew Woods

Robins Kaplan LLP

Gabbi Anderson

Allegro Senior Living

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability