CARMEN PAMPA FUND

Transforming the lives of Bolivians through education.

aka CPF   |   Saint Paul, MN   |  www.carmenpampafund.org

Mission

Carmen Pampa Fund generates financial and human resources to assist the growth and development of the Unidad Academica Campesina - Carmen Pampa (UAC-CP), a college serving impoverished rural families of Bolivia through education, research, production, and community projects.

Ruling year info

1999

Interim Executive Director

Tara Nolan

Main address

PO Box 131145

Saint Paul, MN 55113 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-1949280

NTEE code info

Higher Education Institutions (B40)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Like other developing countries, one of the principle challenges in Bolivia is the difficulty of ensuring that marginalized populations—particularly people living in poor, rural areas—have adequate and affordable access to education that will provide technical training, job readiness, and business development skills to contribute to the economy in rural communities and throughout the country. Women and indigenous populations are at an even greater disadvantage when it comes to accessing equal educational opportunities. Although there are many universities in Bolivia, the majority are expensive, private, and located in an urban setting making them inaccessible to most of the rural population. The Bolivian government does not offer the rural area enough sufficient alternatives to help young people finish school and allow them to obtain or generate work that would promote social and economic development in the rural area.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Support of Scholarship

The main goal of the UAC-CP is to provide affordable, quality education to young men and women from Bolivia's poor, rural communities. Since the UAC-CP was founded to provide education to those who traditionally could not afford to attend university, the College is committed to keeping costs as affordable as possible. All of the students at the College pay only a fraction of the true cost of their education; the rest of the cost is subsidized by other funding.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The primary goal of the first three-year phase of the initiative includes the development a Business Institute on campus. The Business Institute is responsible for implementing a new curriculum focused on entrepreneurship and business management skills for students and graduates of the College and for young men and women in the area who are interested in developing business development skills, as well. In addition, the Business Institute provides oversight to expand the micro-enterprises currently owned and managed by the College. The expansion of the on-campus businesses will increase earned income for the College, as well as provide important hands-on practical experience for students learning about business management.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

General Support of Scholarship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number provided indicates the number of students and theses students registered for class.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

General Support of Scholarship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number provided indicates the total number of graduates from the College to-date.

Number of training programs created

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

General Support of Scholarship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In addition to undergraduate degrees, the College awards certificates and "diplomados". In 2020, a new undergraduate degree in Accounting was added to the course offering.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of graduates who are women.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The College tracks the percentage of women who are students and graduates.

Percentage of graduates who go on to obtain advanced degrees (master's, doctorates, etc.)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

General Support of Scholarship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is measured over a period of time with use of a graduate survey. Overall, 42% of graduates report pursuing and/or receiving advanced degrees.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The UAC-CP was founded in 1993 as a response to the need for affordable opportunities for higher education for rural indigenous populations. Located in the rugged Cordillera Real Mountain Range northwest of Bolivia's capital city, the Unidad Académica Campesina-Carmen Pampa (UAC-CP or the College) addresses the need of providing young Bolivian men and women of impoverished and marginalized populations with equal access to higher education, technical skill training, and job preparedness. The founding mission and vision of the College, combined with an understanding and respect for local indigenous culture, is what makes the UAC-CP's approach unique in its ability to address the social and economic challenges by transferring knowledge and skills to the young people who come from that area and are dedicated to continue living in the rural area.

The mission of Carmen Pampa Fund is to look for and secure financial support and human resources to support the College's work.

With an average annual enrollment of approximately 650 regular students and 50 theses students each year, the College focuses on the development of local human capital to promote economic and social prosperity. The College attracts young people who hail from rural areas to study and learn the critical thinking and research skills needed to support and improve the quality of life not only for themselves but for their communities, country, and global world. The UAC-CP offers five degree-granting programs: Agronomy, Nursing, Education, Veterinary Science, and Ecotourism. The areas of study represent the most critical needs and challenges of Bolivia's rural sector and capture the most opportunity for economic growth and development. Within those five academic departments, the College offers a unique overarching curriculum that incorporates six core components: 1. Academics; 2. Social Service Extension; 3. Production; 4. Research; 5. Leadership; and 6. Entrepreneurship.

As of 2018, the College offers two master's degree programs and 11 advanced-degree certificate programs.

Carmen Pampa Fund's Board of Directors and part-time staff are responsible for securing funding and human resources for the College. CPF leadership and staff collaborate with the College on short-term and long-term programming strategies, as well as managing the international volunteer and visitor program and academic international partnerships.

José Luis Beltran serves as Director General of the UAC-CP. He is assisted by José Luis Mamani, Vice Director. Msgr. Juan Vargas, Bishop of the Diocese of Coroico, is president of the UAC-CP. The College is academically accredited by the Catholic University of Bolivia.

As of July 2021, 923 men and women have graduated from the College.

Notable data captured from the UAC-CP alumni survey include:

• 95% of UAC-CP graduates were employed.
• 91% work in jobs that support Bolivia's rural area.
• 89% are employed in the same field of their area of study.
• 72% found jobs they wanted after graduation.
• 53% of UAC-CP graduates are women.
• 42% of alumni have advanced degrees.
• 300% increase in income reported between UAC-CP graduates and their parents' generation.

In the 2020 academic year, the College launched a new undergraduate degree in Accounting.

During the 2018 academic year, the College introduced two new master's level programs: Climate Change and Coffee & Cacao. The College also offers an additional 11 advanced-degree certificate programs.

In January 2017, in partnership with the Inter-American Development Bank, the College launched a new initiative focused on entrepreneurship, which includes the development of a Business Institute on campus and a plan to rejuvenate the College's on campus micro-businesses. The goal of the project is to promote small business development through academic and practical, hands-on experiences.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Academically accredited by the Catholic University of Bolivia, the UAC-CP educates young Bolivian women and men, primarily of indigenous Aymaran, Quechuan and Afrobolivian heritage, between the ages of 18-26. Enrollment averages about 700 students per year (650 students and 50 theses students). Approximately 60% of students at the College are women, and a majority of students come from low-income, predominately indigenous Bolivian families and are typically first generation college students. Most UAC-CP students hail from six different provinces in northern Bolivia.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, Awards for professors,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

CARMEN PAMPA FUND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CARMEN PAMPA FUND

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mark Leahy

Ameriprise Financial

Term: 2014 -


Board co-chair

Hugh Smeltekop

University of St. Thomas

Term: 2020 -

Tara Nolan

Concentric Energy Advisors

Ann Leahy

Self-Employed

Pablo Eduardo

Self-employed

Lonny Wittnebel

Amparo Ballivian

Retired, World Bank

Claudia Cerruto

Cargill

Mary Pat Lee

Crisis Nursery

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.