MINNESOTA OVARIAN CANCER ALLIANCE INC

aka MOCA   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  www.mnovarian.org

Mission

The mission of the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance is to:

Create an awareness regarding early warning signs that may be indicative of ovarian cancer.
Create and promote resources for support, networking and education for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer and their families.
Unite and educate individuals, the medical community and organizations to achieve earlier diagnosis, better treatment and a cure for ovarian cancer.
Advance ovarian cancer research toward earlier diagnosis, better treatment, and a cure.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Ms. Kathleen Gavin

Main address

4604 Chicago Ave

Minneapolis, MN 55407 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-1960449

NTEE code info

Cancer (G30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (G01)

Specific Organ Research (H40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

• Create an awareness regarding early warning signs of ovarian cancer. • To create and promote resources for support and education. • To unite and educate individuals, the medical community and organizations to achieve earlier diagnosis, better treatment and a cure for ovarian cancer. • To advance ovarian cancer research.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Ovarian Cancer Research Funding

MOCA is a leader in private non profit funding for ovarian cancer research. We manage a competitive grant making process each year to select the most impactful projects to fund. Research proposals are reviewed by both national scientific reviewers who are experts in their field as well as consumer reviewers who understand the urgency of funding that will make a difference to the patient community. In 2021, MOCA provided 5 grants to Minnesota-based researchers for ovarian cancer research projects totaling $500,000 and $100,000 to national researchers for early detection.
In total, MOCA has awarded over $9,800,000 in research grants.

Population(s) Served
Adults

MOCA recognizes the critical role health care providers play in recognizing the symptoms of ovarian cancer and diagnosing the disease to improve patient survival. A full-time staff person is designated to design and execute ovarian cancer outreach programs for the medical community, including the Survivors Teaching Students® program which educated nearly 350 health care students at colleges and universities throughout Minnesota. MOCA awarded Excellence in Cancer Care awards to 3 recipients in 2021 as well as 1 nursing scholarship.
Since 2006, MOCA provided over $65,000 in scholarships to nurses to attend national education conferences.

Population(s) Served
Adults

MOCA organizes a wide range of educational and support meetings for women and families impacted by ovarian cancer including: two membership meetings, public education meetings, ongoing monthly support groups, young survivors support meetings, and Men of MOCA outings. MOCA launched a new offering in 2021, virtual Lunch and Learn sessions to educate survivors on topics to help them take charge of their health. MOCA also provided website resources, critical one on one support to ovarian cancer survivors, families and caregivers via phone, email and in person at our office 40 hours per week. In addition, MOCA provided Cares Kits full of comfort items for women with ovarian cancer and MOCA Dream Awards for women with ovarian cancer to realize dreams. M

Population(s) Served
Adults

MOCA increased awareness about ovarian cancer and support for survivors through various public events in 2021 such as HOM Teal Strides, Light Duluth Teal Gala, Unleash the She in Rochester, MOCA Lights the Night initiative (18 landmarks lit throughout Minnesota), health fairs and educational events. MOCA has a strong media presence and placed 29 unique stories about ovarian cancer on all major TV networks and in several print outlets throughout Minnesota. MOCA events and media stories include information about ovarian cancer, its impact on women, families and the community—and ways to improve survival. MOCA also produces a monthly MOCA Messenger newsletter via email. Additionally, MOCA raises awareness about ovarian cancer through our social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

"Meets All Standards" 2020

Charities Review Council

Star Rating 2022

Charity Navigator

Meets All Strandards 2020

Better Business Bureau (BBB)

Affiliations & memberships

CHC: Creating Healthier Communities 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Ovarian Cancer Research Funding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We award funding for ovarian cancer research projects. We provide funding primarily to Minnesota-based research projects focused on an early detection test, better treatments and a cure.

Number of students educated through Survivors Training Students

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Medical Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Survivors Training Students program reaches medical and nursing students in Univ. of Minnesota, Mayo Clinic, St. Scholastica, Augsburg College and St. Catherine University and others.

Number of support group meetings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient and Caregiver Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Support meetings for women and families impacted by ovarian cancer ncluding MOCA Connections, Coffee and Connection, Men of Moca and Young Survivors Group.

Number of Dream Awards

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient and Caregiver Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Dream Awards given to women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer to help them realize their dreams and create memories with their families and friends while they are able.

Number of public education meetings offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient and Caregiver Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MOCA hosts and organizes public meetings that address education and support for women and families impacted by ovarian cancer.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since our inception in 1999, MOCA's mission has been clear.
• Create an awareness regarding early warning signs of ovarian cancer.
• To create and promote resources for support and education.
• To unite and educate individuals, the medical community and organizations to achieve earlier diagnosis, better treatment and a cure for ovarian cancer.
• To advance ovarian cancer research.
We've awarded $400,000 in research grant funding in 2020. This grant funding awarded by MOCA at our Annual Meeting puts our total research funding over $9.5 million.
We also have made it our goal to continue to reach more medical education professionals and students. As we continue to expand our medical education programs, we're aiming to educate more than 2,000 healthcare professionals and students.
MOCA will also serve the needs of our members by providing support groups throughout the state and meetings that bring experts and information directly to survivors and their loved ones. During 2020, MOCA continued our outreach of our successful Tie it Teal campaign, which provides teal shoelaces to youth sports teams. We plan on taking part in other efforts to raise the profile of ovarian cancer, through Tie it Teal Nights with several of Minnesota's major teams. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month as proclaimed in the city of Minneapolis and will be marked with teal lighting of the 35W and Lowry bridges.
Finally, we're focusing on the success of our major annual fundraising events, including our goal to have the most successful HOM Teal Strides Walk/Run for Ovarian Cancer to date as we mark the event's 22nd year in 2020. This year, we have a goal to raise over $200,000 for ovarian cancer research, support and programming through our premier event.

When it comes to medical education, we conduct our outreach thanks to a talented group of survivor volunteers who give of their time for training and to present to healthcare professionals. We continue to reach out to new groups of providers and students – we added education programs to nurse practitioners and physicians' assistants in the past two years – so we can widen our reach and make sure more professionals are educated about ovarian cancer.
In terms of our public education, MOCA will make sure that our outreach and support programs are spread throughout the state – for women in both our metro area and more rural areas. We will continue to conduct our support groups in the Twin Cities and Rochester areas, but will also continue to promote our telephone support program – the MOCA Mentor program – statewide so women throughout Minnesota can get the support they need. We've also asked our members what type of public education they'd like to see from us, and in turn, we'll be holding several MOCA Living Well meetings this year, including topics on sexual health, treatment after-effects and ovarian cancer research updates.
We are providing over $600,000 to researchers in 2021. This helps spur on our goal to ensure that we continue to fund Minnesota researchers who will make a difference against the disease through research.
Our research and programs are funded by our plan on making our major fundraising events the best ever during 2021 by communicating with our members, encouraging them to get involved and helping them understand just how powerful the dollars they raise are towards research, programming and support.

MOCA's staff, supporters and wide base of volunteers will help us accomplish our goals. The MOCA office has 8 staff members who manage our programs and conduct our outreach – working on everything from communications, to medical education programming, to managing our events and providing support to our survivors, and more. Our office has dozens of years of experience, all united in a goal to make a difference against ovarian cancer. Our MOCA Board of Directors also provides the leadership our organization needs to ensure we meet our mission.
In addition, our network of volunteers helps in so many ways, meaning we can put our fundraising dollars towards research and programming. From volunteering in the office to providing assistance at our major events, our volunteers are a key part of our effort.

MOCA has accomplished so much in our 21 years. We've grown from a grassroots group of a few determined ovarian cancer survivors to the largest state-based ovarian cancer organization in the country with the nation's largest statewide walk/run fundraiser for ovarian cancer research and programming. Our network is now made up of 1,000+ ovarian cancer survivors and more than 45,000 supporters who join us united in our mission.
Our community education programs have educated thousands of individuals, and on a yearly basis, we've been recently educating more than 2,000 healthcare professionals and students. Our public awareness programs have made the state aware of ovarian cancer, with more than 100 youth sports teams wearing our signature teal laces in the first year of the Tie it Teal program alone. We've also gotten the word out about ovarian cancer through the media, with dozens of media interviews each year.
But we have so much more to do – continue to provide support and resources, but of course, make a real and lasting impact against the disease through research. We hope to provide funding towards a research project that will find an early detection test for the disease – and hopefully one day, a cure for ovarian cancer. That is why we'll keep working with our members to make a difference against this disease.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Women with ovarian cancer and their families. Doctors, Nurses, Physician Assistants and health care students. the medical research community. Women at risk for ovarian cancer

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our Community Support Program Manager surveyed members on whether they would like to meet in person or virtually for support groups. We have decided to continue to offer our support groups virtually because our constituents responded they wanted to continue that way rather than in person. We added an in person walking outdoors group for those who requested it and added a young survivor quarterly meet up in person.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We did an evaluation of our grantmaking program and realigned our grantmaking timeline and some grant criteria based on input from past researchers and reviewers. This has made the grant process less onerous for the researchers and reviewers and more interactive.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    we don't collect feedback by demographic. ,

Financials

MINNESOTA OVARIAN CANCER ALLIANCE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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MINNESOTA OVARIAN CANCER ALLIANCE INC

Board of directors
as of 08/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kris Greer

Nancy Libbey

John Wetzel

Ginger Wilhelmi

Becky Drexler

Corrine Florin

Carol Pederson

Tara Wain

Teri Woodhull

Mary Adamski

Mark Urista

Samia Miller

Patricia Bartholomew

Megan Gavin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.