Global Birthing Home Foundation, Inc.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies

aka Maison de Naissance Foundtion, Inc.   |   Leawood, KS   |  http://globalbirthinghomefoundation.org/

Mission

The mission of Global Birthing Home Foundation and Maison de Naissance maternal and infant health center is to significantly reduce maternal and infant mortality rates in underserved communities of Torbeck, Haiti. The center provides pre- and post-natal care, midwife attended deliveries, family planning, well baby care, STD testing and treatment, reproductive health care, and community health outreach. No patient is turned away, whether they can pay the nominal fees or not. In 15 years Maison de Naissance has performed over 6,000 healthy deliveries, and more than 95,000 family planning consultations, empowering thousands of women to take charge of their lives, by spacing and limiting the number of their pregnancies.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Mr. James C Grant IV

Main address

5000 W 134th St

Leawood, KS 66209 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Maison de Naissance Foundation

Healthy Mothers - Healthy Babies Foundation

EIN

41-2156522

NTEE code info

Reproductive Health Care Facilities and Allied Services (E40)

Family Planning Centers (E42)

Community Health Systems (E21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Haiti has the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the western hemisphere, with very limited access to high quality healthcare for 70% of the population who are below the poverty line and cannot afford care even when it is accessible. Access is also limited by very poor infrastructure and societal attitudes towards the poorest of the population. The public health care system is underfunded and requires prepayment for all services, including medical fees and the full cost of all supplies, which normally must be purchased by the patient or the patient's family/friends. We are endeavoring to not only provide the highest quality maternal and infant health care services while removing the barriers of cost, access, and social status, but as a partner with the Haitian Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP), influence the norm of best practices and be a reference center for other maternal and infant health care operations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Maison de Naissance (MN) is a maternity center in rural Haiti which provides professional care for mothers and babies in extreme poverty, using a scaled fee system that includes free as needed.  MN services include pre- and post-natal care, attended deliveries, STD testing and treatment, well baby care, family planning, women's reproductive health, and community health outreach.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth

MN’s “Health Atlas” information management structure includes:

A web-based community health census - Data are inputted daily permitting real time assessments of individual and community health status.  In addition, in 2012 we started an annual community health survey, focused on general health in 2012, and vaccination status/infant mortality in 2013/2014.

Web-based electronic medical records - The data depository includes all inpatient, outpatient, and community health encounters. Patient and community health problems can be monitored by specialists in the United States and timely interventions can be discussed with health care partners in Haiti.
Geographic Information System (GIS) technology - Health information is organized geographically. Health information maps direct individual and community health interventions, and assist in pinpointing trouble areas, e.g., if there is an increase in the incidence of a particular illness being observed in patients presenting at the birthing center.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Our program, partially funded by the Haitian Ministry of Health (MSPP) through reduced price medicines, is focused on prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV/AIDS.  However, we encourage testing of spouses as well, and refer them for treatment when tested positively. Our program is monitored by MSPP and the CDC, to ensure that the latest treatments are employed and highest standards of testing and treatment maintained.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The WHO[1] and the UN, members of H4+ (UNFPA, UNAIDS, UNICEF, UN Women, WHO, World Bank), have all endorsed a midwife attended birth model, which is the core of the Global Birthing Home Foundation Model of Care (UN post-2015 development agenda[2]).  Attended deliveries are the number one factor in the reduction of maternal and infant deaths during childbirth.  Currently, per the World Bank, only 25% of all deliveries are attended by a skilled health worker, vs. 94% in the USA.  The combination of poor hygiene and an inability to cope with even the most minor complications can often have deadly results. [1] http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/midwifery/facts/en/ [2] http://www.thelancet.com/series/midwifery

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Education and counseling concerning the use of a wide variety of family planning methods, from condoms and the pill to long term injectable methods.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Vaccinations, STD treatment, health and hygiene education, attended delivery education and transportation as needed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Quality Leadership Award 2017

GoodBirth.net

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of sexually active females receiving reproductive health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Family planning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals of family planning and reproductive health consultations. The 2021 decline resulted from escalating concerns around the persistence of COVID-19 and public security.

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on annual averages of in-kind hygiene item donations. 2017 & 2021 numbers higher following Hurricane Matthew in October 2016, and an August 2021 7.2 magnitude earthquake, respectively.

Number of children with age-appropriate immunization levels at age two

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Vaccinations are administered in weekly well-baby clinics held year round for the communities we serve. 2021 decline due to COVID-19 and public security concerns.

Number of pregnant women receiving early and adequate prenatal care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019 increase followed closure of many small NGO clinics due to security concerns. 2020 & 2021 declines reflect increasing concerns of COVID and public security.

Number of pregnant women tested for HIV

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

HIV/AIDS testing and treatment referral

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All women are referred for an HIV test at the first prenatal visit for each pregnancy, unless already enrolled in an HIV+ treatment program.

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Estimate based on number of gallons of purified water distributed free from our water purification depot. 2021 decline due to COVID-19 and security concerns.

Number of pregnant women giving birth at a health facility

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Midwife attended deliveries, with pre- and post-natal care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total deliveries at Maison de Naissance and referrals to public hospital for surgical interventions. 2016 & 2017 lower due to Haitian Ministry of Health request to refer all mothers & many deferred.

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total visits for all services provided.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to significantly reduce the maternal and infant mortality rates in rural Haitian communities, where maternal and infant health care services are not otherwise accessible. To date, we have recorded over 7,500 healthy deliveries without a single maternal death, in an region with a population of 72,000. Our services include pre- and post-natal care, midwife attended births, family planning (the largest program in southern Haiti), well baby care/vaccinations, STD screening and treatment, reproductive health education and care, and community health outreach. As more women receive quality healthcare, more mothers are able to help provide for their families, and send their children to school. Family planning services provide an opportunity for mothers to space their pregnancies and add to the community’s economy through increased opportunities to earn income. All of our services are recorded in detail in an Electronic Medical Records system, allowing accurate and complete data collection and tracking. Our success is measured not just by reduced maternal and infant mortality rates, but also by the reduced birth rate of the community as a whole, the economic status of the community, and the number of people receiving our services. We are working to expand the boundaries of our zone of service to reach ever more women who are in need of our services, with an expectation of reaching a population of over 100,000 within the next two years.

Our strategies to expand services include: Training of traditional birth attendants (Matrones) in remote areas and establishing a Network of Essential Services and Treatment (NEST). Both approaches utilize trained Haitian staff, promoting economic development. Our model of care's success demonstrates our capability to train Matrones and establish NEST locations, expanding our service zone to provide high-quality maternal and infant healthcare to a larger population. Each Matrone trained in our program and each NEST location is a foundation for future expansion. Below is an explanation of each approach and how it strengthens our organization’s goal of reduced infant and maternal mortality rates in underserved Haitian communities. 1) Training of Matrones in remote areas: We will recruit Matrones from communities outside of our current service zone, and create a communication network facilitating access to obstetric care prior to and at the time of delivery. Matrones will be a modified type of community health worker, building relationships with women in their neighborhoods, particularly those who are pregnant. The Matrones will provide basic services and education essential to improving maternal and newborn survival. They will attend training sessions regarding their roles, responsibilities and pertinent, pregnancy–focused health topics. Matrones will be issued cell phones, solar chargers, and phone cards, facilitating communication between Maison de Naissance midwives, ambulance drivers and their community’s pregnant women. Matrones will perform monthly home visits to monitor pregnancies, and will provide education regarding signs of impending labor or complications, so they can alert the Matrone to call for transportation as needed. A 4-wheel drive vehicle serves as an ambulance to transport women in labor to Maison de Naissance, or to the city hospital in the event of complications requiring more advanced obstetric care. This program allows women with limited access to transportation and healthcare to get early care and significantly reduce avoidable complications. 2) The NEST initiative focuses on three outcome areas, saving more lives in remote regions of Haiti without access to maternal health services: a) Train nurse assistants to become assistant midwives using a culturally relevant, comprehensive curriculum and methodology. b) Deploy these trained assistant midwives to specially designated NEST outreach clinics located at existing, known sites (e.g., markets, schools, churches. etc.) in remote and isolated areas. c) Implement a communications and transportation system linking the assistant midwives and their patients to MN, which provides supervision and access to emergency services as needed.  An additional benefit of NEST’s strategy is the investment in human capital and local economies by providing opportunities for upward mobility.

We have a proven model of care, supported by well-documented procedures and 17+ years of experience backed by statistical records. We believe in change from the bottom up, working at the grass roots level, incorporating empowerment, economic development and education into our strategic plan. We have a 100% Haitian staff at Maison de Naissance, primarily hired from within our zone of service, helping to establish trust with those who have no experience with institutional care, and have an understandable mistrust of it. Also, Maison de Naissance has utilized an electronic medical records system since the day our doors opened for consistent data recording and reporting. We also provide emergency transportation whenever necessary. We work closely with the Haitian Ministry of Health and Population, and are the first free standing midwifery-based operation to receive a permanent license to operate in Haiti. We have built relationships with other maternal health NGOs throughout Haiti, including a midwife training organization (Midwives for Haiti) to help provide quality staff. This network works to sustain each member through the frequent political, natural, and man-made disasters which plague Haiti. Our co-founder, Dr. Betsy Wickstrom, is a high-risk perinatal consultant and can provide guidance via internet messaging services. We are a member of Goodbirth.net, a network of global midwifery centers, and have been honored by them for our model of care with a "Quality Leadership Award". Our original zone of service encompassed an area with a population of 16,000, and we now serve an expanded geographic area with a population of 72,000, per census records. Global Birthing Home Foundation has the proven processes, experience and consistent history to continue to expand our reach to additional populations.

In 2018, we were able to put into operation a much-needed new emergency vehicle. We have received two Rotary International grants (delayed by unrest and the COVID pandemic) which will 1) Fund a second emergency vehicle and cell phones with monthly stipends for a traditional birth attendant training program; and 2) Implement an HPV testing and treatment program to prevent cervical cancer, the most deadly form of cancer for women in Haiti.  As we approach the 8,000 safe deliveries milestone, our reputation continues to grow throughout the southern peninsula of Haiti. We have seen women travel all the way from Port-au-Prince for needed medicine and/or care for their pregnancies. Our biggest obstacle is the instability of Haiti and the impact on procuring medical supplies. We continue to implement additional controls as needed to insure operations continue whatever the challenge. We continue to demonstrate our successful model of care and longevity as a worthy investment to sustain the funding needed for Maison de Naissance to strive and grow. Despite the many ongoing challenges of working in a remote, rural region of Haiti, with the help of our dedicated Haitian staff and funders, we continue to make a significant and growing impact for the mothers and infants we serve.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    A mostly impoverished regional community of 72,000 with little to no access to any other health and welfare providers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We ceased promoting a family planning method which was not culturally acceptable.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has built stronger relationships with the families and community health committees in the region served.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Global Birthing Home Foundation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Global Birthing Home Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Elizabeth Wickstrom

HCA Midwest

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

Dr. Abbey Masonbrink

Children's Mercy Hospital

Term: 2020 - 2022

Elizabeth Wickstrom

HCA Midwest

Guy Montes

Cucharada Music

Frantz Casseus

Episcopal Diocese of Haiti

Margaret McCann

Abbey Masonbrink

Children's Hospital of Kansas City

Sean Mawhirter

Cucharada Music

Janice Taylor

Laurence Coventry

The Barstow School

Ben Miller

HCA Midwest

Jamie Haeuser

Rotary Club

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.