Junior Achievement of Central Iowa, Inc.

Mission

Junior Achievement (JA) empowers young people to own their economic success. Our volunteer-delivered, K-12 programs foster work-readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy skills, and use experiential learning to inspire kids to dream big and reach their potential.

Ruling year info

1994

President

Ryan Osborn

Main address

6100 Grand Ave

Des Moines, IA 50312 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

42-0759070

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Finance Park

Innovative | Bold | Relevant
JA Finance Park® is all that, and more. This financial literacy laboratory exists to inspire and prepare youth to succeed. There is no question about it: Financial literacy and sound money management skills are essential to success. Today more than ever, young adults need a strong foundation for making intelligent, lifelong, personal financial decisions.

To improve the financial literacy of our future business leaders and employees, Junior Achievement has created an exciting reality-based learning environment for middle and high school students.

JA Finance Park allows middle and high-school grade students to see, touch, and live the experience of personal finance in a real-life setting of stores, shops, and financial institutions, by basically becoming "an adult for the day."

Program Goals
The goals of JA Finance Park and JA BizTown are to:
Teach students to develop and follow a monthly budget
Help students to research and understand the actual "costs of living" for the basic necessities of life
Encourage students to develop and demonstrate personal responsibility for learning and self-management
Communicate and work with schools to promote the highest level of student achievement
Challenge students to think critically, creatively, analyze tasks, and solve problems
At JA Finance Park, students are given a unique life profile after answering a series of future lifestyle questions. Their life profile includes an income, marital status, even kids! Using this new adult persona, students work to create a balanced monthly budget while making decisions regarding housing, transportation, insurance, savings, entertainment expenses and much more.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

JA Ourselves
JA Our Families
JA Our Community
JA Our City
JA Our Region
JA Our Nation
JA BizTown

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA America Works
JA Economics for Success
JA Global Marketplace
JA It's My Future

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA Be Entrepreneurial
JA Career Success
JA Economics
JA Exploring Economics
JA Personal Finance
JA Titan

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Innovative | Bold | Relevant

JA BizTown® is all that, and more. This financial literacy laboratory exists to inspire and prepare youth to succeed. There is no question about it: Financial literacy and sound money management skills are essential to success. Today more than ever, young adults need a strong foundation for making intelligent, lifelong, personal financial decisions.

To improve the financial literacy of our future business leaders and employees, Junior Achievement has created an exciting reality-based learning environment for elementary students.

JA BizTown students to see, touch, and live the experience of personal finance in a real-life setting of stores, shops, and financial institutions, by basically becoming "an adult for the day."

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

5 Star Award 2022

Junior Achievement USA

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Junior Achievement of Central Iowa, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of Central Iowa, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/06/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Marta Codina

Wells Fargo

Andrew St. John

CIPCO

Andy Wood

Bankers Trust

Ben Roach

Nymaster Goode

Brett Bosworth

R&R Equity Partners

Brian Hughes

GuideOne Insurance

Brian Neitzel

IMT

Brian Waller

Insurance Finance Corp.

Carrie Valster

ITA Group

Casey Decker

Farm Bureau Financial

Chris Jones

Casey's General Store

Craig Krimbill

Sammons Financial Group

Dan Mart

North Polk School District

Dave Moore

Businessolver

Derrick Walton

Bank of the West

Dirk Halupnik

SE Polk School District

Duane (DT) Magee

Norwalk School District

Elaine Castelline

Prairie Meadows Racetrack & Casino

Gary Hoffman

NCMIC Finance Corporation

Geoff Christy

Principal

Glenn Oberlin

Workspace

Jackie Haley

Community Bankers of Iowa

James Green

Mercer

Jason Hamilton

BKD

Jasen Dahm

Vision Financial

Jeff Austin

Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Jill Urich

Ankeny School District

Jim Langin

Liberty National Bank

Jody Gehl

LightEdge

Kurt Gibson

Community State Bank

Laura Kacer

Johnston School District

Laurie Rasanen

Voya Financial

Lisa Remy

West Des Moines Community Schools

Marta Codina

Wells Fargo

Marty Walsh

Walsh Door & Hardware

Melissa Ness

Oasis - A Paychex Company

Mike Lacy

Meredith Corporation

Mike Tousley

The Weitz Company

Patricia Dyar

John Deere Financial

Rachel Adams

Two Rivers Marketing

Randy Rubin

MercyOne Medical Center

Rod Foster

RSM US LLP

Ryan Weese

Shindler, Anderson, Gopelrud & Weese, P.C.

Sean Vicente

KPMG LLP

Stacy Snyder

Midwest Independent Bank

Steve McCullough

Iowa Student Loan

Steve Probst

Holmes Murphy

Stuart Ruddy

Knapp Properties

Tim Grabinski

MidAmerican Energy

Tim Heuss

US Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data