PLATINUM2023

Food Bank of Iowa

Stopping hunger starts here.

Des Moines, IA   |  http://www.foodbankiowa.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide food for Iowa children, families, and seniors to lead full and active lives, strengthening the communities where they live.

Ruling year info

1982

President & Chief Executive Officer

Michelle Book

Main address

P.O. Box 1517

Des Moines, IA 50305 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Food Bank of Central Iowa

EIN

42-1177880

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Congregate Meals (K34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food Bank of Iowa's mission is to provide food for children, families, and seniors to lead full and active lives, strengthening the communities where they live. Right now in Iowa, 11% of individuals live in poverty. That means more than 300,000 people lack access to the food they need to thrive. Without enough nutritious food, adults can struggle at work and at home, health problems can develop or worsen, and stressful decisions can add up. In children, the lack of adequate nutrition can have profound, lifelong impacts on growth, development, and learning.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Partner Network Food Distribution

Our primary program is the distribution of food through a network of 700 partner agencies, including community food pantries, school pantries, congregate meal sites, homeless shelters, veterans service offices and others.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Seniors
Children
Veterans

To supplement our primary distribution, we have established a network of food pantries located within and operated by schools. These pantries are primarily designed to serve students and families in need, but may also serve other community members.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The mobile pantry program is designed to place a temporary, pop-up food distribution resource in underserved areas. Serving both as an emergency resource for area residents in need and as a proof of need to local leaders, the mobile pantry is intended to lead to the implementation of a more permanent solution.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

The BackPack Program provides a sack of nutritionally balanced, child-friendly foods to children in need at the end of each school week. The BackPack sack is intended to provide food to that child over the weekend, returning him or her to school the next week ready to learn.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The USDA defines a meal as 1.2 lbs. of food. We use our distribution data to calculate total meals. Each data set corresponds with the fiscal year (July 1-June 30) beginning that year.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data point includes all food rescued from our retail partners. It does not include general donations or USDA TEFAP foods.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our organizational partners include food pantries, homeless shelters, congregant meal sites, schools, and many other types of organizations. A merger in Jan. 2018 greatly increased this number.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data point reflects total individuals served through our programs and partners. This number does not reflect unique individuals.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is a hunger free Iowa. By working to provide adequate supplies of nutritious food to our partner agencies and through our own programs, we can help ensure that every Iowan living in the 55 counties we serve has all they need to thrive. We currently distribute more than 1.5 million lbs. of food per month. To meet the need in the communities we serve, we project that figure will quickly reach 2 million lbs. of food per month.

Food Bank of Iowa continues to address growing and unprecedented need throughout our 55-county service area. Poverty, rising cost of living and dramatic changes in SNAP benefits and eligibility have left more Iowans in need of food assistance than during the height of COVID. Food Bank of Iowa’s operations have been pushed in unexpected ways. Doubling our food storage capacity through our newly expanded Des Moines distribution center will allow us to take advantage of better pricing and operate more efficiently. We are working to close the meal gap and ensure hardworking Iowa families, children, seniors and veterans have the nutrition they need to live full and active lives.

Food Bank of Iowa is committed to:
- Nutritional equity for households with limited food budgets
- Access for vulnerable Iowans – children, seniors and veterans
- Expanded collaborations with proven, trusted service organizations

To that end, our commitments include:
- Food Bank of Iowa will increase the number of school districts with pantries to 100 by the end of FY 2024 and to 168 by the end of FY 2026. For the largest school district we serve – Des Moines Public Schools – we are working toward every school getting its own pantry. School pantries support the entire family.
- Food Bank of Iowa will have food in 30 Veterans Service Organizations by the end of FY 2024 and all 55 county VSOs by the end of FY 2026.
- Food Bank of Iowa will work with Area Agencies on Aging to provide services for seniors in 30 counties by the end of FY 2024 and all 55 by the end of FY 2026.

With a staff of 40 dedicated professionals, 10 refrigerated trucks, and 2 large-scale distribution centers, Food Bank of Iowa is ideally suited to serve as the hub of our state's robust food assistance network. Since 1982, we have built a robust, resilient network of more than 700 hunger-fighting agencies to help us distribute food to people in need, and our direct distribution programs help us ensure that every food insecure Iowan we serve gets the food they need to thrive.

Food Bank of Iowa partners with 143 school pantries in 43 counties. We support two monthly mobile pantries for veterans in Des Moines and Ottumwa, as well as distribute emergency food boxes through 13 county VSO offices as often as needed. We are working with Area Agencies on Aging to connect older Iowans with food assistance resources in their local communities across 55 counties.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Food Bank of Iowa
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Food Bank of Iowa

Board of directors
as of 07/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ken Clary

Bellevue Police Department

Term: 2022 - 2024

Ross Dean

Versova

Hannah Krause

Eden

Capt. Ken Clary

Bellevue Police Department

Brennen Smith-Hargrove

John Deere

Casey Decker

Sammons Financial

Miriam De Dios Woodward

ViClarity

Bill Even

National Pork Board

Brad Liggett

Nationwide

Chad Willis

Ruan Transportation

Jill Hittner

Principal Global Investors

Terri Vaughan

University of Iowa

Jim Dean

Affinity Credit Union

Tim Glenn

Corteva

Mike Simonson

Simonson and Associates

Clay Holderman

UnityPoint Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/13/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.