PLATINUM2024

Central Institute for the Deaf

Listen Talk Read Succeed

aka CID   |   Saint Louis, MO   |  cid.edu

Mission

CID’s mission is to teach children who are deaf and hard of hearing to listen, talk, read and succeed. We empower families and professionals in St. Louis and worldwide to help children reach their fullest potential. Unlike most schools for the deaf, we do not use sign language.

Notes from the nonprofit

Your support brings the world of listening, speech, spoken language and opportunity to children who are deaf and hard of hearing and their families. Thank you.

Ruling year info

1934

Executive Director

Dr. Heather Grantham PhD

Main address

825 S Taylor Ave

Saint Louis, MO 63110 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-0662456

NTEE code info

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Graduate, Professional(Separate Entities) (B50)

Ear/Throat (G42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Data indicates that 92% of children with hearing loss are born to two typically-hearing parents. According to a survey, 85% of these parents prefer their child learn spoken language as their method of communication (as opposed to sign language). Unfortunately for these parents, most schools for the deaf focus on sign language. For over a century, CID – Central Institute for the Deaf has served as a resource for those families who want their child with hearing loss to learn how to listen and talk.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CID Joanne Parrish Knight Family Center

CID serves children birth to age 3 in the Joanne Parrish Knight Family Center by helping their families learn to work with them at home to begin to develop listening, speech and language skills. The program features home visits, remote coaching sessions and flexible scheduling. In CID toddler classes, children 18 months to 3 years old receive small-group and one-on-one instruction from experienced teachers of the deaf. Teleintervention sessions are available for all families. Our family support specialist provides helpful resources and opportunities to connect and learn.

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers
Caregivers
Families
People with hearing impairments

The CID Virginia J. Browning Primary School prepares children who are deaf and hard of hearing ages 6 to 12 to listen, talk, read and attend their neighborhood schools.

Our teachers are specially trained many years of experience helping children who are deaf and hard of hearing develop listening, language and speech along with skills in all academic areas—from reading and literature to math, science and social studies. CID teachers, audiologists, speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists are committed to a team approach.

Our curriculum meets state grade level standards and uses much of the same academic content used in general education schools throughout the U.S. We offer a diverse and challenging educational program emphasizing small class sizes, individualized instruction and a hands-on approach to learning. With a goal to develop the whole child, our program includes classes and special activities in art, PE, music, study skills and social skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with hearing impairments
Families
Parents

In CID's Anabeth and John Weil Early Childhood Center, teachers of the deaf and early childhood specialists help 3- to 5-year-olds build speech, language, pre-literacy, pre-academic and social skills in a child-friendly and language-rich environment. The curriculum features play-based learning and includes children who can hear as natural language and child development models. Families may participate in remote coaching sessions to promote carryover of skills at home.

Population(s) Served
Children
Economically disadvantaged people
Preteens

CID's Martha E. Jones Center for Pediatric Audiology provides expert, doctoral-level hearing assessment and hearing device fitting for children birth to age 12 who attend the CID family center and school as well as for CID alumni up to age 18.

Population(s) Served
People with hearing impairments
Family relationships
People with hearing impairments
Family relationships
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

The CID Emerson Center for Professional Development offers classroom-trialed deaf education and auditory training curricula, workshops, online courses and a variety of resources designed to help teachers of the deaf, speech-language pathologists, pediatric audiologists and general education teachers better serve children who are deaf and hard of hearing using listening and spoken language.

Population(s) Served
Academics
Teachers

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

CID at Washington University School of Medicine 2003

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Our goal is for at least 80% of our returning students to make one year’s growth or more in one year’s time in the areas of receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary and overall language.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with hearing impairments

Related Program

Anabeth and John Weil Early Childhood Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

CID uses standardized tests normed on typically-hearing children to assess our early childhood center student's outcomes.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with hearing impairments, Caregivers, Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

100% of CID students who are deaf and hard of hearing receive 100% scholarship support. Tuition is free for these families.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our overarching goal is to help children who are deaf and hard of hearing acquire listening and spoken language skills similar to their peers so they can graduate from CID and join their local school, ready to succeed.

For children, our goal is for them to make more than a year’s progress in a year’s time in order to catch up with their peers.

For the families we serve, we want to provide them the support and resources necessary to make them an excellent teacher and advocate for their child.

Lastly, we want to share our expertise with other professionals worldwide who are not familiar with listening and spoken language as an option for a child who is deaf.

CID provides interventions on two levels for the children we serve. An audiological intervention means they have access to digital hearing aids and/or cochlear implants and that they are programmed to maximize the quality of sound they can hear. An educational intervention then takes place to make the best use of the sound the children receive. A typical class size at CID is 2 to 4 children, which allows for a highly individualized education.

All children at CID receive support from our pediatric audiologists. Our Family Center serves children birth to age 3; our Early Childhood Center serves children ages 3–5; our Primary School serves children 6–12. Our Emerson Center for Professional Development serves other professionals around the world.

CID is one of the oldest listening and spoken language schools for the deaf in the country. All of CID’s professionals who work with children have either a master’s or doctoral-level education. Our program has served as a model for other parts of the world who want to establish a similar program. We combine state grade level curricula with CID-developed listening, speech and language curricula that is also used throughout the world.

Our graduates have attended universities including Princeton, Vassar, Harvard and Yale. They have gone on to become architects, social workers, lawyers, pilots, doctors, engineers and more. Their families credit CID with providing the foundation for their success. Collectively, our students are proof of our mission—that children who are deaf and hard of hearing can learn to listen, talk, read and succeed.

An important recent objective has been to eliminate barriers keeping families from accessing a CID education for their children. To that end, starting in the 2022-2023 school year, thanks to our generous community combined with school district contracts, tuition is free for all children who are deaf or hard of hearing enrolled at CID.

We also now serve more families by offering audiological services and additional family support after children leave CID and up to age 18.

We now have a full-time family support specialist on staff to meet the needs of our parents and caregivers for education, community and connection to vital resources.

Our comprehensive data solutions initiative has enabled us to begin to collect and share a variety of useful data to help evaluate and improve our educational programs.

We reimagined and developed a new organizational website to improve information, accessibility and use for parents and caregivers with children who are deaf and hard of hearing who seek CID services. We are working on content and expect to launch it in February or March of 2023.

We are working on our next, working 3-year strategic plan, which will go into effect in the 2023-2024 fiscal year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Central Institute for the Deaf
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Central Institute for the Deaf

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dennis Reagan

Retired, The Muny

Term: 2022 - 2024

James M. Snowden

Huntleigh Securities Corp.

John Weil

Clayton Management Co.

Theodore Armstrong

Retired from Angelica Corp.

Hugh Scott, III

Stifel Nicolaus & Co.

W. Bruce Springer

Retired Attorney

Tina Klocke

Prosper Capital

Robert G. Clark

Clayco

C. Baker Cunningham

Retired from Belden CDT Inc.

Joanne Parrish Knight

No Affiliation

Laurie Miller

No Affiliation

Scott Monette

Ralcorp

Lisa McLaughlin

Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC

Dennis Reagan

The Muny

Linda Goldstein

CI Flooring

Carrie Johnson

Graybar

Florence Hawes

No Affiliation

Elizabeth Dorr

No Affiliation

Virginia Browning

No Affiliation

John Arenberg

Retired Public Relations Specialist

Mariquita Barbieri

Carmody MacDonald P.C.

Jeffrey Tucker

Enterprise Holdings

James Seeser

Retired from JDS Uniphase

Frank Childress

Wells Fargo Advisors

Laurie Haffenreffer

No Affliliation

William Bixby Sheldon

Retired from Paraquad Inc.

Carolyn Rayner

Saint Louis University

James von der Heydt

Innoventures

Mark Cochran

S. M. Wilson &Co.

Robert Crumpton

Edward Jones

Garrick Hamilton

The Koman Group

Robin Hattori

Washington University

Toni Jackson

Pinnacle Consulting Associates

Kerrin Kowach

SLU School of Law

Karen Leebolt

No Affiliation

Claudio Abreu

Centene Corp

Tiffany Charles

Commerce Trust Company

Craig Buchman

Washington U School of Medicine

Tad Edwards

Benjamin F. Edwards

Jane-Ellis Griggs

Summersault

Karen Leebolt

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/06/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.