Great Circle

Discover the Strength Within

aka Great Circle   |   St. James, MO   |  www.greatcircle.org

Mission

Great Circle reshapes vulnerable lives through a community of partners, teachers and leaders, giving children and families the confidence to create bright futures. We provide a unique spectrum of behavioral health services to those struggling through difficult circumstances. We equip them with tools and support they need so they can thrive. We embrace the same inspiring virtues we find in those we serve. To be courageous; just as they have shown the courage to ask for - and accept - our help. To never give up; by celebrating each victory and persevering through each setback.By holding onto the belief that anyone, once lost, can be reclaimed and redirected. By staying committed to serve not as a last resort, but as a first step toward a future that is brighter than the one left behind.

Ruling year info

1950

CEO

Dr. Paula Fleming

Main address

PO Box 189

St. James, MO 65559 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Boys & Girls Town of Missouri

Edgewood Childrens' Center

Butterfield Youth Services

EIN

43-0681471

NTEE code info

Family Counseling, Marriage Counseling (P46)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Great Circle Is an agency that provides a unique spectrum of behavioral health services to children and families. With specialized programs and highly-trained professionals, we provide hope to those in difficult circumstances throughout Missouri and beyond.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Academic Services

In partnership with more than 100 school districts across the state, Great Circle Academy provides education services to children with severe emotional, behavioral and learning challenges, as well as children with communication disorders, cognitive delays, a diagnosis along the autism spectrum, or in recovery from substance use. Children benefit from individualized education and behavior therapy in small class settings at one of Great Circle's education campuses. In addition, Great Circle provides counseling, therapy, and mentor services in public and private schools in the community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Infants and toddlers

Great Circle provides a full spectrum of services to support children who have experienced trauma and those with autism spectrum disorders. Trauma can include loss (death, divorce, etc.), witnessing violence, abuse or neglect. The resulting emotional, behavioral and learning challenges impact overall well-being of children and their family members. Violence toward others, self-harming, use of drugs or alcohol, promiscuity, and other behaviors are the result of anxiety, depression and other challenges faced by children who have experienced trauma. Regardless of the reason, some young people need stability in a safe, structured environment to overcome difficult situations. Our 24-Intensive Treatment Program ensures they have a place to heal, learn and grow. Children benefit from therapeutic, psychiatric, medical, academic, and recreational programs that help them discover their internal strengths and learn strategies for implementing positive, effective coping skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Non-adult children

Great Circle's Home and Community Based Services help children and families maintain stable, permanent homes through in-home counseling, crisis intervention, parent education, respite, independent living and foster care services.Great Circle's staff of highly trained social workers, educators, therapists, family counselors and child advocates work to keep children safe, healthy, and whenever possible, with their biological family. These services take place within people's homes or in their community, helping children stay connected to loved ones, improve the home environment and strengthen families.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Ambulatory Care Accreditation 2018

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of parents engaged in fewer acts of abuse and neglect of their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Home and Community Based Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Indicators include parental stress, use of corporal punishment, and involvement with child protective services.

Number of families who report they are supported in utilizing natural supports in their communities (e.g., family, friends, neighbors, churches, colleges, recreational services)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Home and Community Based Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The indicator for this metric is the number of social supports parents and families report.

Number of children the organization de-registered from the child protection register

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Home and Community Based Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The indicator for this metric is families reunified.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Great Circle has become one of the most comprehensive providers of behavioral health services in Missouri, the Midwest and beyond. Great Circle has grown exponentially, doubling our outreach and almost tripling our service locations through a portfolio of services. With campuses, counseling centers and home and community-based services statewide, we touch the lives of more than 37,000 individuals, children and families annually. Great Circle represents the children, individuals, and families we serve. Great Circle’s vision is that we all stand together to help guide those in times of struggle – not as a last resort, but as a first step. Great Circle's broadest aim is to de-stigmatize behavioral health as a best-in-class behavioral health services option for all children, individuals and families. We champion change and growth for those who seek our services. And as we help each succeed, we play an integral role in strengthening the fabric of every community we serve.

Priority Area 1: Strategic Alignment
Great Circle is aligned internally and externally to effectively respond to existing needs and emerging changes in the child welfare and behavioral health landscape.
Priority Area 2: Exceptional Services
Commitment to providing exceptional trauma-informed services by engaging clients with evidence-based practices to achieve sustainable outcomes.
Priority Area 3: Employer of Choice
Foster an inspiring, equitable, and inclusive environment that attracts, develops, and retains a highly qualified, selfless and diverse team of professionals.

We are embarking on a journey called Robust Process Improvement with The Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare. The purpose is to create a culture of continuous improvement of processes through employee empowerment with the goal of providing exceptional service.
It is important because we want a staff driven approach to ensure we are living out our core values every day.
With this, we will be able to deliver the highest quality behavioral health services, ensure the safety of our clients and staff, and build upon our strong financial foundation for continued successful growth.
What we need from you is:
• Front line staff: buy-in, patience, positivity, honesty, ideas, commitment, and integrity.
• Supervisors: leadership, buy-in, guidance, patience, positivity, honesty, ideas, commitment, integrity and support.
• Support staff: buy-in, patience, positivity, honesty, ideas, commitment, integrity, and support.
• SLT and ELT: Focus, financial support, trust, empowerment, professionalism, praise, and transparency.
• Clients: Input/feedback, honesty, and participation.
• Stakeholders: Input/feedback, resources, buy-in, and support.

Results: In 2020, clients displayed decreases in three subscales of parental stress. Notably, clients displayed a 7.6 decrease in difficulty of childcare, a 6.7 decrease in parental distress, and a 6.0 decrease in parent-child dysfunction.
Results: In 2020, families at Great Circle had a 39-percentage point increase in family health, a 36-percentage point increase in self-sufficiency, and a 28-percentage point increase in child well-being. Overall, families had a 15-percentage point increase in their overall level of family well-being.
Results: Overall, 78% of students had improved math scores and 85% had improved reading scores in 2020.
Results: In 2020, 57% of clients had improved relational health, 94% of clients had improved cortical modulation ratio, and 89% of clients had an improved NMT Metric overall.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children and Families

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Great Circle
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Great Circle

Board of directors
as of 7/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Andrew Miedler

Edward Jones

Term: 2017 - 2021

Theodore Armstrong

Retired CFO, Angelica

Karlos Bledsoe

Edward Jones

John Carton

Community Volunteer

Gregory Christoffel

Brooks Management

Benjamin Costello

UMB Bank

Clark Davis

Cameron MacCallister Group

William Fleck

Wallis Oil Company

Jack Gillis

J.P. Morgan Private Bank

Peggy Gordin

St. Louis Children's Hospital

David Gutting

Barkley

Victor Haddock

Magellan Health, Inc.

Jim Hill

Ernst & Young, LLP

Mary Hunzeker

Lindbergh Watson Company

Darryl McKinney

Community Volunteer

Andrew Miedler

Edward Jones

Dennis Reagan

The Muny

Barbara Richter

Community Volunteer

Nicole Roach

Webster University

Paul Sundet

University of Missouri - Columbia

Julie Sward

Moneta Group

Richard Ward

Ward Development Counsel, LLC

Heather Wood

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data