HEART OF MISSOURI UNITED WAY INC

Columbia, MO   |  www.uwheartmo.org

Mission

The Heart of Missouri United Way fights to improve lives in our community.

Ruling year info

1958

Executive Director/CPO

Mr. Andrew Grabau

Main address

105 East Ash Street, Suite 300 Suite 201

Columbia, MO 65203 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Columbia Area United Way

EIN

43-0735827

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We recognize structural racism and other forms of oppression that have contributed to persistent disparities that United Way seeks to dismantle. Our United Way network strives to engage community members, especially those whose voices have traditionally been marginalized. We work with residents and public and private partners to co-create solutions that ensures everyone has the resources, support, opportunities, and networks they need to thrive. We commit to leveraging all of our assets (convening, strategic investments, awareness building, advocacy) to create more equitable communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Impact

We improve the health, education and financial stability of every member of our community by forging unlikely partnerships and co-creating solutions to problems with the help of local members of our community. As a data-informed organization Community Investments are made through Impact Grants, COVID-19 Pandemic Response and Recovery, Inclusion, Diversity and Equity (IDE) grants and Capacity Building/Continuous Improvement program.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Social and economic status


United Way funds services that ensure young people have equitable access to gain the knowledge, skills and credentials so they are prepared for the workforce and able to obtain family sustaining employment. We recognize community investments are crucial from early childhood through transition to young adulthood (age 0-26).

We remove educational barriers for young people and their families by investing in programs that demonstrate the following client age-appropriate outcomes:

Meet or exceed age-appropriate developmental milestones
Gain positive parenting/co-parenting skills
Improve kindergarten readiness
Increase social connectedness
Increase prosocial behaviors
Develop positive values, social competencies, and positive identities
Improve or maintain academic performance
Graduate from high school on time, and/or earn HiSET, and/or earn credentials, based on client goals
Gain further education, vocational skills, and/or job readiness skills, based on client goals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

United Way funds services that strengthen the financial stability and economic mobility of individuals and families who are financially vulnerable.

We address the community’s financial stability needs by targeting programs that demonstrate the following client and/or community outcomes:

Gains in skills and/or credentials needed for employment and/or increased wages.
Gain and sustain employment and/or increase income.
Increase disposable income by increasing financial literacy and/or reducing costs and/or accessing benefits.

Population(s) Served
Adults

United Way funds services that strengthen the health and well-being of individuals and families who are most vulnerable. In alignment with the community, United Way recognizes four programmatic areas necessary to achieve health and well-being: (1) Basic Needs, (2) Safe, Healthy, Affordable Housing, (3) Mental Health care, and (4) Medical and Dental care.

We address the community’s health needs by targeting programs that demonstrate the following client and/or community outcomes:

Progress toward stability
Healthy behavior, based on client goals
Decreases in negative health behavior, based on client goals
Measurable health improvements

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Health, Age groups

Related Program

Community Impact

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric reflects Community Impact Grant Investments. Total dollars invested has increased while some grants have been consolidated to reduce grant burdens on funded agencies.

Net promoter score

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations

Related Program

Community Impact

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This net promoter score is specifically in relation to the Equity Challenge email series. This data was collected through a survey of people who completed the challenge. The Equity Challenge is open.

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Community Impact

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, Heart of Missouri United Way received 14 applications for Education Impact Funding from 12 local organizations serving people in Boone, Cooper and Howard Counties.

Number of diversity training courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Impact

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2021 Equity Building Dialogues tailored for each audience.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Heart of Missouri United Way is strategically advancing community impact, enhancing internal improvements, advancing community-wide awareness, and increasing revenue to improve lives in our community.

No Poverty, Gender Equality, and Decent Work and Economic Growth: Lead community impacts efforts to expand effective job readiness efforts and support inclusive economic growth in local communities. Connect people to the workforce via job skills training, employment services and opportunities for wage growth. Provide access to mainstream financial services to help families lower costs.

Zero Hunger, Good Health and Well-Being, and Clean Water and Sanitation: Lead community impact efforts to improve health and/or reduce hunger in low-income communities. Increase access to physical activity and healthy food. Expand access to healthcare services and insurance.

Quality Education: Lead community impact efforts aimed at improving education outcomes for children and youth. Expand access to high-quality Pre-K and literacy supports. Connect youth with academic support, enrichment, college and career prep, mentors. Connect youth to early work experiences via internships and jobs. Engage parents to support early learning.

Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure, Reduced Inequalities, Peace Justice and Strong Institutions, and Sustainable Cities and Communities: Lead community efforts to convene leaders and residents to understand common challenges, define aspirations, and identity local solutions. Lead efforts to engage residents to ensure that diverse perspectives and experiences help create equitable solutions to common issues.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people of Boone, Copper, and Howard County.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Each year, Heart of Missouri United Way hosts a Community Summit, in part to inform our investment strategy for the upcoming Impact Grant cycle. In 2021, at our Equity in Education Summit we learned and improved in the following ways. Resources for students in middle school or older are scarce so we're increasing our Education Impact to reach young people up to age 26. Educators shared concerns that the pandemic affects students' learning progress and also their social and emotional development. In response, we've expanded our Education Impact funding strategy to support long-term recovery for students. In Spring of 2022, we will host the Equity in Economic Opportunity Summit to inform improvements in our Financial Stability Impact grant program.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By demonstrating that we use feedback for continual improvement, we have benefited from an increase trust and sense of solidarity.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

HEART OF MISSOURI UNITED WAY INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HEART OF MISSOURI UNITED WAY INC

Board of directors
as of 2/8/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mike Ireland

Bank of Missouri

David Putnam

First State Community Bank

Lee Hendrickson

Providence Bank

Erica Pefferman

The Business Times Company

Mitzi Clayton

University of Missouri Athletics

Randy Cole

City of Columbia

Debbie Daniels

13th Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri

Aimee Davenport

Stinson Leonard Street

Damian Dean

United Community Builders

Tom Dugan

KOMU-TV 8

Gary Ford

Community Volunteer

Stan Gerling

Central Bank of Boone County

Greg Grupe

Community Volunteer

Steve Guthrie

Landmark Bank

Steve Hollis

City of Columbia

John Landrum

Landmark Bank

Mindy McCubbin

Shelter Insurance Companies

Nikki McGruder

Diversity Awareness Partnership

Nathan Miller

Columbia College

Steve Nagel

Joe Machens Autogroups

Eryca Neville

Columbia Public Schools

Troy Norto

Williams-Keepers LLC

Clyde Ruffin

First Ward Councilman

Bob Schaal

Missouri Orthopaedic Institute

Cynthia Schreen

Zimmer Radio Group

Mahree Skala

Community Volunteer

Bernard Solomon

Columbia Public Schools

Peter Stiepleman

Columbia Public Schools

Garnett Stokes

University of Missouri

Steven Sowers

Commerce Bank

Dale Tideman

3M

Kelly Wallis

Boone County

Andy Waters

Community Volunteer

Jessie Yankee

Easy PC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/02/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.