Goodwill of Western Missouri & Eastern Kansas

Donate. Shop. Empower.

Kansas City, MO   |  www.MoKanGoodwill.org

Mission

Goodwill empowers people to discover their potential and adapt for the future through the power of work.

Ruling year info

1978

President and CEO

Mr. Funmi Popoola

Main address

800 E. 18th Street

Kansas City, MO 64108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-1125281

NTEE code info

Vocational Rehabilitation (includes Job Training and Employment for Disabled and Elderly) (J30)

Thrift Shops (P29)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Systemic inequalities perpetuate the cycle of poverty. - 16% of adults have no digital skills; and the digital divide disproportionately impacts individuals who identify as Black (22% have no digital skills) or Hispanic (35% have no digital skills) - 16% of adults score below a basic reading level, and 33% of adults score below a basic math level; and Black and Latino communities see a disproportionate rate of poor reading and numeracy skills - In the Kansas City area, only 28% of people who identify as Black and 25% of people who identify as Hispanic have at least an Associate’s degree At the same time, technology is changing work. - 54 million jobs will be eliminated by 2030 due to automation - 60% of jobs have at least some tasks that could be automated today - Many vulnerable adults are working in low wage occupations with skills that will soon be obsolete We aim to upskill individuals to close gaps and create generational wealth through the power of work.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Individualized Employment Services

COVID19 caused the unemployment rate to spike at 11% in our region. While the unemployment rate has steadily declined, many people are still in need of support.

Goodwill's employment services support adults seeking to earn employment and advance their careers. Participants work one-on-one with Workforce Development Specialists to create Career Development Plans that outline their career goals and the steps it will take to accomplish those goals. The purpose of these services is to support individuals in successfully overcoming barriers and consistently moving forward on their career journey.

Each person receives services in a customized way based on their individual needs. Services may include: career development planning, career exploration, resume development, interview practice, benefits navigation, job application support, wraparound services, digital skills training, essential skills training, financial literacy support, job placement, and retention support.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Unemployed people
Low-income people

In 2019, only 19.3% of persons with a disability were employed in the United States. For persons without a disability, the employment participation rate is 66.3%.

From AbilityOne.gov: "The AbilityOne Program uses the purchasing power of the federal government to buy products and services from participating, community-based nonprofit agencies nationwide, dedicated to training and employing individuals who are blind or have significant disabilities. Through the AbilityOne Program, people who are blind or have significant disabilities enjoy full participation in their community and can market their AbilityOne-learned skills into other public and private sector jobs."

Goodwill manages AbilityOne contracts for janitorial services at the Richard Bolling Federal Building and Fort Leavenworth. The contracts provide living wage employment, benefits, wraparound services, ongoing case management, and high quality of life for individuals with significant disabilities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Annually, nearly 20,000 individuals are released from incarceration in Missouri, and between 2000 and 4000 settle in Kansas City. These individuals face significant barriers in their reentry. Within three years of release, over two thirds of prior offenders recidivate, and within five years, over three fourths are rearrested. Employment is one of the most important factors in preventing recidivism.

Goodwill provides support to individuals with legal history in earning and keeping employment. Participants may get immediate employment at Goodwill or elsewhere. Simultaneously, workers are provided services to support advancing their careers long term, including creating an individual career development plan, digital skills training, financial literacy support, benefits support, funding for transportation, funding for clothing and devices, and funding for vocational training. The goal is for justice-involved individuals to secure employment, advance their careers, and not recidivate.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

82% of job openings require basic digital skills. However, 32 million Americans have no digital skills at all, and over half of Americans have some basic digital skills, but struggle with comprehensive digital literacy. The digital divide also disproportionately impacts individuals who are older, black, and Hispanic. 35% of Hispanic individuals, and 22% of African American individuals, have no digital skills.

Goodwill offers digital skills assessments and training in order to combat the digital divide. Goodwill offers training in the following areas: basic computing skills, Internet basics, using email, Window, Mac OS, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, and web browsing. These training courses occur in-person, virtually, or via our mobile workforce unit. In addition to digital skills training, our digital navigation services help individuals access free or inexpensive devices and home broadband.

Population(s) Served

The 4th Industrial Revolution is here, and it is changing work. A 2019 McKinsey and Company study found that 54 million jobs in the United States may be eliminated by 2030 due to automation. Already, 60% of jobs have at least some tasks that may be automated with currently available technology. COVID-19 has sped up that timeline by changing consumer trends and forcing employers to make modifications to encourage social distancing and working from home. On top of that, our community’s most vulnerable citizens will be disproportionately impacted. Individuals with limited education, limited work history, different abilities, criminal backgrounds, etc. are more likely to hold entry level, repetitive jobs - these tasks are the most automatable.

The fastest growing need for upskilling is for workers without a 4-year degree. In the Kansas City area, only 28% of African Americans and 25% of Hispanics have at least an Associate’s degree. There are 850,353 adults 25 years old and over who have less than a 4-year degree, and our region has persistently struggled to close this gap. These individuals must be able to access upskilling opportunities for the jobs of the future before they become unemployed, and even unemployable.

The Goodwill Artemis Institute is launching in 2021. This adult workforce training program will focus on preparing vulnerable workers and individuals with disadvantages for the jobs of the future. We will work hand-in-hand with employers and other training providers to create stackable certifications in booming fields including robotics, 3D printing, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, virtual/augmented reality, and the Internet of Things. The program will incorporate best practices for adult education, and care for the whole person with wraparound services. Participants will be paired with a Community Resource Specialist to support them in creating a career plan, overcoming barriers, and earning and retaining employment. We also plan to build in real world learning opportunities provided by real employers, to promote skill building.

BRIDGE TO TECHNOLOGY (2021):
Most middle-skill careers require proficiency in high school-level math, reading, and writing skills. Yet, 1 in 6 adults in the US scores below a basic reading level , and 1 in 3 adults in the US scores below a basic math level. Socioeconomic factors have a strong impact on literacy skills in the United States, and Black and Latino communities see a disproportionate rate of poor reading and numeracy skills. Many credential and degree-providing programs exist in our region, but interested individuals are locked out because they cannot pass pre-assessments, perpetuating gaps in employment and wage growth. 8 in 10 bridge programs turn away at least 10% of applicants for not meeting requirements, and 27% turn away at least half of applicants.

The Goodwill Artemis Institute will close these opportunity gaps with a Bridge to Technology course. This short, flexible course will quickly upskill individuals who have an aptitude for and an interest in tech careers, but who were unable to pass training entrance exams. We will offer training in numeracy, literacy, digital skills, and 21st Century skills. Additionally, we will provide modules describing the 4th Industrial Revolution, and the new industries and job opportunities it is creating. Community Resource Specialists will walk alongside participants to provide wraparound services and career exploration. Graduates will be referred back to other training providers to continue their stackable training toward a living wage tech career.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Low-income people
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Low-income people
Unemployed people

Goodwill operates fourteen donated goods retail stores and one outlet center. At these locations, generous community members donate gently used clothing and household items and Goodwill resells them to others. The sale of unwanted items provides funds to support our local employment programs and services. Additionally, Goodwill retail staff have access to all of Goodwill's employment programs and services; we intentionally empower employees to work with the workforce development team to create career development plans, pursue training, and advance their careers - at Goodwill, or otherwise. Goodwill's resale stores also support sustainability, by providing a convenient way for individuals to share their unused items. Resale diverts millions of pounds of goods from landfills each year.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2013

(CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2017

(CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2020

Awards

Sustainability Awards - Gold Winner 2018

Kanas City Industrial Council

Employer of Choice 2021

Employer of Choice International Inc.

Affiliations & memberships

Nonprofit Connect Member 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people, Unemployed people, People of African descent, Multiracial people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goodwill empowers people to earn and keep employment. We track how many individuals earn a job while, and immediately after, a person receives services.

Number of clients satisfied with employment training services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We survey participants annually to ensure we are meeting expectations and providing satisfactory services. We measure this as a percentage who give a rating of "highly satisfied" or "satisfied".

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of unduplicated individuals served across all of our services and workforce development programs.

Total weight of materials recycled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Goodwill receives generous donations of used household items and clothing from the community. Items are sold, salvaged, or recycled to maximize waste reduction. This number is total donation poundage.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goodwill of Western Missouri and Eastern Kansas empowers people to discover their potential and adapt for the future through the power of work. Goodwill strives to be a leader in innovative practices that promote individual self-sustainability for people who have been marginalized.

Goodwill remains committed to helping people become more independent and reach their potential, primarily through education, training, and employment. While the core of our mission is unchanged, we will seek new collaborations and partnerships with like-minded organizations and businesses. Our services and operations will expand thoughtfully and with the support of local communities. We will build a greater understanding of our work and why it matters, and we will increase the number of persons served while working to further improve individual outcomes.

We aim to:
- Engage proactively with individuals with barriers, individuals who have been marginalized, individuals who are under- and unemployed, and individuals of low to moderate income
- Expose individuals to new, future-state opportunities in the workforce
- Train individuals in the skills needed for the future state of work, including digital literacy, 21st Century skills, numeracy, literacy, and tech-career credentials
- Support individuals in earning right-fit jobs
- Connect individuals to wraparound supports
- Empower people to retain work and advance their careers

To accomplish our goals, we will:
- Open new Goodwill resale stores to grow sustainable revenue for our mission
- Grow janitorial service offerings to continue to diversify revenue
- Seek community partners for collaboration and feedback
- Develop and integrate future state technologies into our retail processes and mission services
- Be an agile, data-driven organization
- Improve our feedback loops with stakeholders
- Become a community convener, influencer, and advocate for emerging issues around equity, adult education, and the future state of work
- Launch career training opportunities for the 4th Industrial Revolution
- Expand the number of job seekers we serve each year
- Become an employer of choice so that we can attract, hire, and retain diverse talent
- Create a culture of learning, growth, and accountability

Goodwill has a passionate workforce with diverse backgrounds and experiences. Our staff have the training and expertise necessary to guide clients down the road to self-sustainability. Goodwill also has a strong group of community partnerships and memberships including several Chamber of Commerce organizations through the metro area, Nonprofit Connect, the Kansas City Coalition for Digital Inclusion, the Kansas City Tech Council, the Federal Reserve, NCircle, Healing House, Inc., SkilledKC, and so many more. Goodwill offers comprehensive services in order to assist people with barriers to employment with the job search, position acquisition, and job retention through training, case management, career coaching, and financial positioning.

Goodwill of Western Missouri and Eastern Kansas has been providing workforce development services for 127 years. Since our inception, we have:
- Served 632,000 people
- Provided over 23,032,000 services
- Secured over 203,000 jobs

We are also part of an international network of 150+ Goodwill organizations, the leading workforce development entity in the US. In 2019, Goodwill collectively served more than 25.7 million people. One out of every 275 new hires received services from a Goodwill.

In 2020, Goodwill served 12,065 people and placed 601 people into employment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Goodwill serves people in our community who are unemployed or underemployed seeking opportunities to build their skills and find sustainable employment.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has strengthened the relationship with our program participants and empowered them to share their experience.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Goodwill of Western Missouri & Eastern Kansas
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Goodwill of Western Missouri & Eastern Kansas

Board of directors
as of 05/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jameson Auten

Kansas City Area Transit Authority

Term: 2017 - 2024

Steve Hamilton

Retired

Carlanda McKinney

CHWC, Inc.

Beth Ward

Hallmark Cards

Kelly Schemenauer

AMC Entertainment

Jameson Auten

Kansas City Area Transportation Authority

Mike Collins

Foley Equipment

Awais Sufi

SchoolSmartKC

Andrew Place

GEHA

Carolyn Vertovec

Fisher Investments

Christian Scharosch

1248 Holdings and Montage Investments

Jason Spacek

Consultant

Sandra Garcia

Metropolitan Community College

Sheri Johnson

McCownGordon Construction

Katie Lord

Proof Positioning

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/18/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.