Outreach International

Kansas City, MO   |  www.outreach-international.org

Mission

Outreach International is a global nonprofit that supports local leaders and community-led groups who develop lasting solutions to poverty-related issues. Together with local leaders, we empower communities to organize, prioritize and mobilize to identify their needs, and then access the resources necessary to overcome challenges and reach their goals. Along the way, communities gain the experience of working together toward a shared objective, as well as the confidence that comes from achieving success through collaboration. Our mission is to confront the injustice of chronic poverty through community-led action. Facilitating the fundamentals of participatory development ensures that those most affected by poverty-related issues become those best equipped to permanently resolve them.

Ruling year info

1988

President & CEO

Dr. Kevin W. Prine

Main address

112 W. 18th St.

Kansas City, MO 64108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-1164177

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Human and Community Development

Outreach International engages in human and community development, literacy and child survival, and civil society, working in areas of extreme poverty in Bolivia, Cambodia, DR Congo, Haiti, India, Malawi, Nepal, Nicaragua, Philippines, and Zambia.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2006

Community of Christ - Affiliate 1979

Independent Charities of America 2011

The Movement for Community-led Development 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of individuals in impoverished communities who benefited from our facilitation to create lasting solutions to poverty.

Number of community initiatives in which the organization participates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of poverty-related issues prioritized and addressed through the facilitation of indigenous Outreach staff, using a proven process to bring residents and their communities out of poverty.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each participant contributes an average of 12.94 hours to project preparation, and 23.58 hours to project implementation once they collectively identify the issues they wish to resolve.

Number of new programs/program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of field program locations dedicated to alleviating poverty.

Total revenue earned to support advocacy efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Outreach provides development education, awareness-raising, and activities to promote sustainable global development based on values of equality, social responsibility, and human rights.

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Outreach monitors and evaluates impact using baseline data and impact reports, trends in demographics, patterns and results, and investments to measure our method of eliminating poverty.

Estimated number of new funding sources secured for the sector

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thirty-one new community income-generating projects were created in 2016, and an additional 10 income-generating projects are ongoing. Governmental and non-governmental resources were accessed.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers in the U.S. and U.K. assist in sharing knowledge and advocating for those in poverty, promoting Outreach campaigns, fundraising, and assisting with headquarters office functions.

Number of loans issued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

1,539 people benefited from food loans and feeding programs. This reduced indebtedness, provided additional food, and created savings for other basic family needs.

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2017 - health/hygiene products/tools consisted of 69 wells/water catchment systems, 285 toilets/bathrooms, 81 smokeless eco-stoves, 4,139 medical/vision consultations and supplies, among others.

Number of Current Field Program Communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Multiracial people, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Resources Accessed by Community-Based Organizations and Their Communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of disaster, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Human and Community Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Grow field personnel, projects, and number of communities by at least 15% annually.
2. Incorporate a standardized, rigorous system of measurement and feedback loops in at least two countries per year.

1. Continue diversifying revenue streams.
2. Continue building strong connections and engaging the loyal donor base.
3. Continue creating an outstanding work environment and culture at both headquarters and in the field.
4. Continue exploring ways of improving/learning across all internal and field systems.

1. Over 40 years of fine-tuning the intellectual capital behind the Participatory Human Development Process.
2. Low turnover and a strong communication network among field programs allows for cross-team training and dissemination of best practices.
3. A truly scalable model of sustainable development.
4. Efficient and effective internal operations.

1. Scalability has been achieved in internal operations - we've moved from 4 software platforms to 1.
2. The financial statements are stronger than they have ever been in the history of the organization.
3. All documentation has already been translated into Tagalog (for Philippines) for the Multi-Dimensional Poverty Assessment Tool. Translations into two other languages are in process.
4. Contract and initial design has been completed for the Apricot database and technology.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Across four continents, individuals who have been born in multi-generational, extreme poverty, usually in rural areas.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Each of the more than 500 project areas with which we are engaged annually is originated and executed by the people served by that project. As well, each of the projects (because they are always multi-faceted and generally impact more than one Sustainable Development Goal) entails both the creation of stronger local leadership skills and feedback mechanisms after the project is complete. And so, for example, with the recent ramifications of COVID, including physical distancing, this accelerated a new methodology of supporting community-led engagement in villages without one of our primary staff members.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Because asking for feedback is a key portion of our very first step - integration - we have always been highly cognizant of this power differential and how we can best alleviate that problem. For many, especially grandmothers, this is the first time any nonfamily member has ever asked them about their lives and challenges. For this reason, in 75% of the 125 community-based organizations that Outreach supports, more than 50% of the members are women.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Outreach International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Outreach International

Board of directors
as of 11/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Shelley Scherer

Pittsburgh Promise

Term: 2017 - 2021

Steve Darling

Partner, Hoblit Darling Ralls Hernandez & Hudlow, LLP San Antonio, TX

Richard Lindgren

Graceland University

Shelley Scherer

Associate Executive Director, Pittsburgh Promise

Dan Stifter

Hallmark - Retired

Kenneth Garrett

16th Circuit Court

Scott Murphy

Community of Christ

Laura Clark

BERKS Group

Tim Connealy

Paul Davis

CIO & CFO, Graceland University, (Ret.)

Margaret Keating

Senior Executive, Hallmark (Ret.)

Mark Richards

Associated Warehouses

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.