Human Services

Boys Hope Girls Hope of St. Louis, Inc.

aka BHGH STL

Richmond Heights, MO

Mission

To nurture and guide motivated young people in need to become well-educated, career-ready men and women for others.

Ruling Year

1979

Executive Director

Ms. Cassandra Sissom

Main Address

8027 Elinor Avenue

Richmond Heights, MO 63117 USA

Keywords

children, education, development, youth, boys, girls, home, hope, abuse, teenagers, homeless

EIN

43-1202596

 Number

6576168791

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Group Home (Long Term (P73)

Citizenship Programs, Youth Development (O54)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

In the City of St. Louis, 25% of all high school students in the public schools drop out before graduation (City Health Dashboard, 2017). Furthermore, only 34.2% of the City’s population aged 25 years and older has earned a bachelor’s degree (St. Louis Regional Chamber, 2017). As education becomes more and more imperative for job and earnings attainment, youth-in-need in our community are not reaching their potential. According to the St. Louis Regional Chamber’s estimates, St. Louis residents with a bachelor’s degree earn a median income of $52,438, and those without a high school degree earn a median income of only $21,475. Earning potential with a college degree is more than double that of a high school dropout. Our efforts are important not only for the scholars who graduate from our programs, but also for their future families; post-secondary education graduates have access to higher wages, better employee benefits, career networks, and further social resources.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

1 4 10

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Residential Project HOPE

Hope Prep Academy

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of graduates enrolled in higher learning, university, or technical/vocational training

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of scholars who graduate from four year colleges and university within six years

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

During academic year 2018-2019, 24 collegians were on track to meet this metric. Two graduated and earned their undergraduate degrees.

Number children performing average or above average academically

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Related program

Residential Project HOPE

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

During the 2018 - 2019 academic year, scholars earned a cumulative average 3.0 GPA. Staff has been working to ensure all scholars meet this goal and we anticipate all 20 reaching this in 2019-2020.

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Through use of our tutors, mentors, and proprietary college preparatory programming, all scholars participate in age-appropriate academic enrichment.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

BHGHSTL works to break the cycle of poverty by providing access to education and enrichment opportunities to youth-in-need. Participating scholars apply as middle school students for acceptance into our comprehensive, long-term, holistic residential program that offers: • College preparation, including college tours • ACT Prep • Lifelong, 1:1 mentor relationships • 1:1 academic advising and ongoing subject-specific tutoring • Personal growth opportunities including character development workshops and cultural enrichment opportunities • Summer camp participation • Development of volunteerism mindset through annual completion of 40 hours of service • Post-secondary program support and scholarships based on eligibility • Ultimately a path through post-secondary education and into successful careers The BHGHSTL program capitalizes on the innate grit and resilience in scholars, nurturing emotional growth, fostering skill building, and encouraging the exploration of a scholar’s interest and potential career path. All program participants are capable, motivated, and come from backgrounds of measured need. Acceptance is based on demonstrated academic ability, behavior and emotional capacity to succeed in college. Scholars graduating from high school in our care continue to receive emotional and social support services on their campuses as Collegians. Beyond college, many scholars tap into the national network of committed Boys Hope Girls Hope stakeholders to help begin their careers.

BHGHSTL makes a deep investment in a select number of high potential youth who, at a significant rate, overcome challenging family circumstances and other systemic environmental risk factors to become high performers committed to bettering themselves and their communities. Our model emphasizes quality over quantity and depth over breadth. Enrolled scholars live year-round on our campus and receive wrap-around services that enable the growth of the whole person, and upon matriculation into college, receive emotional support, assistance navigating higher education administration and financial aid offices, and, if eligible, financial support in the form of a scholarship. Our program provides: • A safe, nurturing home environment under the direction of a trained, professional residential staff, including clothing, proper nutrition, and access to cultural enrichment opportunities • Character development and personal growth opportunities including monthly community service experiences • Life-coaching, relationships with quality mentors, the opportunity for spiritual development, and the clear communication of high expectations • Placement in college preparatory schools, college preparatory programming, and comprehensive academic support • Guidance through the processes of: career exploration, post-secondary program discernment, and applications for college admittance, financial aid, and scholarships • Financial and emotional support throughout the transition to and completion of college Our model incorporates an individualized, strengths-based, and whole-person development model in which the scholars become responsible for shaping their own growth in healthy collaboration with the BHGHSTL Program team, and each scholar’s guardians, mentors, educators, and therapists. This collaborative goal-setting and growth tracking process is called Service Planning, and these plans are developed in the context of a conference with the scholar, his/her guardian(s), the Residential Counselor identified as a “point person” for the scholar, the Program Manager, and other key individuals as appropriate, such as therapists or school personnel. Together this group identifies realistic, meaningful and SMART personal, emotional, social, physical, and intellectual goals and pairs them with concrete action steps, indicators of progress, targets, and time frames. Within this framework, BHGHSTL delivers holistic, evidence-based programming to the youth in our care. We focus on ensuring that scholars are able to meet our three organizational goals: Goal 1: Scholars demonstrate academic success in and graduate from college preparatory schools. Goal 2: Scholars increase the academic and extracurricular skill sets predictive of success in school. Goal 3: Scholars grow in emotional intelligence, character asset development, civic awareness, independent living skills, and experience and competency to successfully transition to mature, productive adulthood and become leaders.

Boys Hope Girls Hope has been in operation since 1977. Our experience has evolved with the needs of our youth, and we work to remain updated in best practices in the education and youth development space. We benefit from membership in an International Network of Boys Hope Girls Hope affiliates who share the same goals. The Headquarters hosts conferences and offers guidance and regular assistance with programming and governance needs. Our direct services staff each receives at least 80 hours of training within their first 90 days of hire, and each year thereafter they receive a minimum of 40 hours additional annual training. This training includes CPR, First Aid, Medicine administration, and BHGH STL policies and procedures, licensing protocol. Additionally, trauma-informed practices and Therapeutic Crisis Intervention training are required, and staff remains on track with monthly direct service staff meetings. Annual cultural competency training is also offered to both staff and volunteers, and built into our budget is a stipend for each staff member to pursue professional development opportunities.

Our key performance indicators (KPIs) are measured by our Network Performance Management Tool, which tracks performance indicators in the following domains: 1) Leadership, Governance, and Learning; 2) Human Capital Management; 3) Business and Operations; 4) Resource Development and Fundraising; 5) Brand, Marketing and Communications; and 6) Programming and Participant Outcomes. All of these indicators are monitored in pursuit of our long-term goal to nurture and guide promising young people as they grow into educated, productive adults. KPI data as measured by our Performance Management Tool informs strategic planning and identifies operational areas needing support, growth, and improvement. This information is shared and reviewed at the board level and additionally with leadership at the BHGH Network Headquarters. The Performance Management Tool (PMT) is a set of standards through which Boys Hope Girls Hope measures our practices and successes, as well as a process for reviewing performance on these standards. The PMT pinpoints specific indicators through which BHGH Network Headquarters and BHGHSTL measure progress, allowing us to track detailed data over time. With well-documented data, BHGHSTL is empowered to make informed decisions about what works best for our youth, to increase our transparency as an organization, and to share our most successful methods within our network, with other organizations in our field, with donors, and with our communities. BHGHSTL undergoes an annual PMT review process, evaluating performance against BHGH Network and national industry standards in all six domains. Any areas that do not meet expected compliance or outcome standards are brought to the attention of the Board of Directors, and together they and staff create action plans to rectify the situation.

Our scholars worked hard to have a tremendous 2018 - 2019 academic year. They finished out with a home average 3.0 GPA and enjoyed various extracurricular activities. In May, all of our residential scholars matriculated to the next grade level. Four residential scholars and ten Hope Prep Academy Scholars graduated from high school and enrolled at colleges of their choice, earning a substantial amount of scholarships. Our Collegians also excelled this past year: two scholars who had been on full ride scholarships graduated from Washington University in St. Louis. One is now studying for the LSAT, and the other has chosen to continue at Wash U toward her Masters in Social Work at the Brown School. In addition to our scholar successes, Boys Hope Girls Hope of St. Louis has grown organizationally during 2019 - 2020. Partnering with our International Headquarters, we have implemented an internal program compliance and quality control process we call the Performance Management Tool, which is helping to elevate and enhance our programming. We have additionally transferred our documentation into a new data management system that will help streamline our reporting, and we have hired a full-time licensed therapeutic counselor to provide services to all of our scholars. In September 2019, we welcomed former Program Director Cassandra Sissom, LPC as our new Executive Director, and she has taken her leadership role to the next level. She already has implemented action on our new strategic plan initiatives, including increasing collegian success and residential outcomes, diversifying revenue streams, and improving staff retention. Together, Cassandra and Development Director Jan Wacker raised over $900,000 at our signature Evening of Hope dinner gala in November 2019, partnering with local corporations including Emerson, World Wide Technology, and Edward Jones. We continue to be humbled by the community of support that rallies around our scholars.

External Reviews

Financials

Boys Hope Girls Hope of St. Louis, Inc.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No