Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

Metropolitan Energy Center, Inc.

Transforming energy use in America's Heartland since 1984

Kansas City, MO

Mission

Metropolitan Energy Center's mission is to create resource efficiency, environmental health, and economic vitality in the Kansas City region.We believe conscientious energy consumption
should be a key goal for all government, corporate and general public
consumers. To achieve this goal we aim to increase energy efficiency in the built and transportation environments, reduce greenhouse gases, increase equitable access to clean and affordable energy,
reduce reliance on fossil fuels and increase local economic activity
related to market transformation in these areas. Specifically, we plan
to increase by 16% annually the regional use of clean alternative fuels
in transportation and to reduce by 2% per year the amount of energy
used in KC metro's built environment. Both activities will result in
substantial greenhouse gas reductions.Through administration of grant funding, we provide education, resource matchmaking, and the deployment of technology and conservation strategies. Through community partnerships, we conduct outreach and technology demonstrations to target audiences and to the general public, raising the knowledge level on these topics. In doing so, we also increase the urgency and political will to act decisively to reverse trends contributing to climate change.

Ruling Year

1984

Principal Officer

Mrs. Kelly M Gilbert

Main Address

31 W 31 St

Kansas City, MO 64108 USA

Formerly Known As

Metropolitan Energy Information Center, Inc.

Keywords

MEC, efficiency, energy, environmental sustainability, education, alternative fuel, transportation, Clean Cities, Metro Energy

EIN

43-1297891

 Number

6150210435

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015.
Register now

Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Metropolitan Energy Center aims to increase energy efficiency in the built and transportation environments, reduce greenhouse gases, reduce reliance on fossil fuels and increase local economic activity related to market transformation in these areas.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Kansas City Regional Clean Cities Coalition

Energy Solutions Hub

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Kansas City Regional Clean Cities Coalition

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Occasionally, we have a major media pick-up of a story. In 2017, NPR's All Things Considered developed a story with our help around electric vehicles. We are still compiling 2018 data.

Number of carbon emissions prevented (estimated by CO2 equivalent)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Kansas City Regional Clean Cities Coalition

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Tons of GHG emissions reduced due to reduced gasoline and diesel use by over 8 million gal. in each of the last 4 years. In 2015, the modeling calculator was altered to align with prevailing science.

Number of energy retrofits on area buildings

This metric is no longer tracked.
TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

These retrofits were performed under the EnergyWorks KC program.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our goal is conscientious energy consumption. We plan to increase by 16% annually the regional use of clean alternative fuels in transportation and to reduce by 4% over 2 years the amount of energy used in KC metro's built environment. Both activities will result in substantial greenhouse gas reductions.

Metropolitan Energy Center improves energy efficiency in the built environment and encourages the use of alternative fuels in the transportation sector. Through administration of grant funding, we provide education, resource matchmaking, and the deployment of technology and conservation strategies. Through community partnerships, we conduct outreach and technology demonstrations to target audiences and to the general public, raising the knowledge level on these topics. In doing so, we also increase the urgency and political will to act decisively to reverse trends contributing to climate change.

Metropolitan Energy Center has a long history of successful grant administration and collaboration with a variety of stakeholders from public and private sectors and across regional boundaries. In the past twenty years, through the Kansas City Regional Clean Cities Coalition, MEC has worked with numerous public and private fleets on a variety of projects to improve the environmental performance and efficiency of our regional vehicle fleet. Since 2009, under Principal Investigator Kelly Gilbert's leadership, MEC has secured and successfully managed more than $40 million in federal and local funds for clean vehicle, fuel station, and advanced fuel projects in partnership with fleets across four states. These have included the deployment of hundreds of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles, installation of dozens of alternative fuel and electric charging stations, and provision of Green Fleet management planning services designed to help organizations craft long-term policies and best practices for managing high performing vehicle fleets. MEC is led by Executive Director Kelly Gilbert, who is also the KC Regional Clean Cities Coordinator. With years of successful federal funding management, MEC has the legal, contractual, financial, and administrative systems in place to facilitate work with multiple partners and project elements. Federal funding awards administered by MEC since 2009: Safe Alternative Fuels Deployment in Mid-America (US DOE, $250,000); Mid-America Clean Highways DERA Program (US EPA, $749,935); Mid-America Collaborative for Alternative Fuels (US DOE, $815,000); Midwest Regional Alternative Fuels Project (US DOE, $14,999,995); Community Readiness for EV and EVSE in KS and MO/Electrify Heartland (US DOE, $441,000); EnergyWorks KC subrecipient (US DOE, $2,000,000); and KC Environmental Workforce Development Partnership (US EPA, $300,000). In addition to these Federal awards, MEC has also administered outreach and training awards from several local and national sources to support workforce development, biofuels education, gaseous fuel technician training and other topics. Our seasoned programmatic staff, technical, and administrative capabilities, along with strong relationships with industries, fleets, technical contacts, and government will enable us to achieve successful outcomes through the administration of these transportation emission mitigation projects.

Metropolitan Energy Center tracks reduced energy consumption in kilowatt-hours, therms, and gasoline-gallon-equivalents reduced. We also track reduced greenhouse gas emissions and air quality emissions tracked in the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. We also measure our progress in the growing alternative fuel infrastructure in and around Kansas City.

Kansas City is now home to one of the largest EVSE deployments in America. Announced in January 2015, Kansas City Power & Light's Clean Charge Network surpassed 1,000 EV charging stations in 2016. Although a few are located as far as 85 miles from Kansas City, the majority of Level 2 and DC fast charging stations are within the metropolitan area. The network is nearing completion, and the region has become the leading city in America for EV driver growth, with EV ownership numbers, charging sessions and electrical use for vehicle charging up more than 400%. Low blends of ethanol are readily available throughout the Coalition service area, even some E15 sites. Ethanol as a fuel additive is much cleaner than other additives that help the fuel burn cleaner in the engine and heavily contributes to state economies in KS and MO. There are now 9 public CNG stations in Missouri and 12 in Kansas, which accommodate Class 8 freight fleets, AT&T service vehicles, traveling CNG traffic, and new development within private fleets. In 2016 alone, two new public stations opened in Kansas City, Missouri. Many of the existing stations now offer high pressure flow dispensers to accommodate Class 7 and 8 truck traffic. Compressed natural gas is increasingly being supplied from renewable sources, such as biogas and landfill gas, which simultaneously provides a financial opportunity from a waste product and also prevents the sources from emitting methane directly into the atmosphere. CNG burns cleaner than diesel engines, especially in low speed, heavy duty applications, such as neighborhood trash and recycling pickup. In the two and a half years of its existence, the City Energy Project mobilized the major stakeholders involved with commercial buildings to focus on building efficiency, increased information and awareness of commercial building performance tools, promoted benchmarking as a primary strategy, and supported the development of effective energy efficiency policies and procedures in Kansas City, MO and the surrounding region. By 2030, the projected annual benefits of the policies and procedures thus established will be:  3,276,133 MMBtu in site energy savings (5.3% citywide)  7,167,836 MMBtu in source energy savings (5.4% citywide)  597,230 tons of GHG emissions in CO2 equivalents (6.3% citywide)  $55,314,872 in cost savings (5.0% citywide) At the end of the initial grant period, Kansas City's Office of Environmental Quality invited Metropolitan Energy Center to continue the work of the City Energy Project through the creation of the Energy Solutions Hub, not only to support the City's existing efforts, but to expand efforts to improve the efficiency of commercial buildings metro-wide. Our next focus areas include assisting states/fleets with VW's air emissions cheating settlement; operating current grants; and generating new partnerships and opportunities for the Energy Solutions Hub.

External Reviews

Awards

Affiliations & Memberships

US DOE Clean Cities Coalition

Financials

Metropolitan Energy Center, Inc.

Need more info on this nonprofit?

Need more info on this nonprofit?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No