Our Little Haven

Caring for Children & Families. Mind. Body. Soul.

aka OLH   |   Saint Louis, MO   |  https://www.ourlittlehaven.org

Mission

Our Little Haven is relentlessly committed to providing early intervention services for children and families. Our community of professional caregivers creates a safe, secure and healing environment for those impacted by abuse, neglect and mental or behavioral health needs. We make the hurting stop, the healing begin and the love last, one family at a time.

Ruling year info

1991

Executive Director

Mr. Scott Hummel MSW, PhD (hon)

Director of Finance and Operations

Mr. Mike Bahlinger CPA

Main address

PO Box 23010

Saint Louis, MO 63156-3010 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-1567500

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our Little Haven is addressing early childhood abuse, neglect, behavioral and mental health concerns by offering services through a suite of programs designed to make an impact on the child, the family, and the community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care Case Management at the Taylor Family Care Center

Providing case management while investing in the strength and stability of family through compassionate, comprehensive foster care and adoptive services. Taylor Family Care Center's professional staff offers to help children and families attain safety and permanency. Services include psychological and development assessment; counseling; day treatment; in-home services; and mental health services just to name a few. All care is provided in collaboration with sister agencies in the St. Louis Partners coalition (Catholic Charities, Lutheran Families and Children 's Services, Bringing Families Together.)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Early intervention diagnosis and full day therapeutic treatment is provided in an engaging preschool educational setting by educational therapists (one therapist for each 3 children).  Psychologist and licensed clinical social worker provide individual and family treatment with consultation care provided by a pediatric psychiatrist.  Mental health care stabilizes children ages 3-5 so that emerging mental health problems don't become full-blown disorders, difficult to treat.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
People with psychosocial disabilities

Keystone Outpatient Mental Health Services is a mental health practice that provides professional services: mental health assessments/evaluations, treatment, and community consultation.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Foster children often have serious chronic health care needs. Each foster child at OLH receives a medical health needs assessment as they come into care in our case management program. Our nurse gathers and reviews medical records, collect smedical history and develops an individualized primary care plan for each child to help promote healthy futures.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2023

Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity 2023

Awards

What’s Right In The Region Award 2009

FOCUS St. Louis

Smurfit-Stone Entrepreneurial Alumni Award 2009

St. Louis University

Princeton Award 2007

Princeton University

Local Hero Award 2006

Bank of America

Advocacy Award 2004

St. Louis Children’s Hospital Trustees

Lifetime Achievement Award 2013

St. Louis University Women's Commission

Entrepreneurial Alumni Award 2014

St. Louis University

Entrepreneurial Alumni Award 2014

St. Louis University

Affiliations & memberships

Council of Accreditation of Child and Family Services, Inc. 2023

National Health Services Corps 2022

Missouri Coalition for Childred 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of Keystone Clients with Symptom Reduction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, At-risk youth, People with psychosocial disabilities, Children and youth

Related Program

Keystone Mental Health Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a measure reflecting the reduction of mental and behavioral health symptoms as measured by mental health professionals using diagnostic tools. The goal is 72% of the clients are successful.

Percentage of Keystone Clients with Increase in Functioning

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, At-risk youth, People with psychosocial disabilities, Children and youth

Related Program

Keystone Mental Health Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a measure reflecting the success of routine functions/activities as measured by mental health professionals using diagnostic tools. The goal is 80% of the clients are successful.

Percentage of Our Little Academy Clients with Symptom Reduction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

Our Little Academy Therapeutic Preschool

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is a measure reflecting the reduction of mental and behavioral health symptoms as measured by mental health professionals using diagnostic tools. The goal is 72% of the clients are successful.

Percentage of Our Little Academy Clients with Increase in Functioning

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

Our Little Academy Therapeutic Preschool

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is a measure reflecting the success of routine functions/activities as measured by mental health professionals using diagnostic tools. The goal is 80% of the clients are successful.

Number of Clients in Medical Case Management Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers, Families, Foster and adoptive children

Related Program

Medical Case Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a measure reflecting the number of children case managed by licensed, credentialed, registered nurse as part of a holistic approach to healing.

Permanency Rate at Taylor Family Care Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Caregivers, Foster and adoptive children

Related Program

Foster Care Case Management at the Taylor Family Care Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

"Permanency Rate" - percentage of children who have been placed in permanent homes (extended family, adoptive family) or reunited with birth family; and, have not returned to state custody. Goal = 15%

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Goals of Our Little Haven beginning in July 2021 through July 2025 are to:
1. Effectively serve at-risk children per year through an early intervention process measured by assessment tools.
2. Produce a 95% "Permanency Rate" through the Taylor Family Care Center Foster measured by assessment tools, & outcome results.
3. Produce a "Zero Re-Admission" through the Taylor Family Care Center Foster measured by assessment tools, & outcome results.
4. Produce an 85% "Reduction of Symptoms" of clients through the Keystone Program measured by assessment tools, & third-party audits.
5. Produce 95% "Client Satisfaction" through the Keystone Program measured by client survey, parent observation and outcome results.
6. Produce 90% "Success After Academy" through Our Little Academy measured by a long-term study of educational placements, and parent interaction.
7. Produce 85% "Reduction of Symptoms" of clients through Our Little Academy measured by assessment tools, and third-party case audits.

There are numerous strategies to help the organization "do better." These strategies were a result of a team approach to identifying what needs to be in place to assure success. Each Program submits strategies to Strategic Leadership Team (SLT) for analysis and implementation. SLT suggested 10 strategies that each Program Team uses in their efforts toward being "better" at what we do.
1. Performance Quality Improvement meetings monthly.
2. ARC “Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity" meetings monthly.
3. Initiated a DE&I education/training process for all staff and leadership.
4. Design "Action" to respond to Program Reports.
5. Design a Communication Plan to keep employees updated and informed.
6. Design Consumer Panel to add customer voice to the process.
7. Engage Volunteer Leadership with accountability measures using goals and objectives of programs for better service.
8. Maintain COA accreditation.
9. Design Orientation/Training Committee to resolve ongoing needs.
10. Develop “5 Questions" to be used to define success.
11. Combine the Strategic Plan process with the Performance and Quality Improvement (PQI) process.

Our Little Haven has an abundance of resources to support the effort toward meeting these goals. After a year of identifying and stating the strategy and goals, many resources have been made available to ensure continuous outcome measurement resulting in:
A budget that includes funds for the DE&I process; Performance and Quality Improvement (PQI) and ARC (Accessibility, Responsiveness, and Continuity) processes (key tools to a strategic approach to successful goal setting and accomplishments); COA accreditation process; Washington University and University of Tennessee Client Satisfaction process; standing PQI Trustee Committee; staff engagement with PQI and ARC meetings; routine/monthly measurement of success; peer-review; and, an Organization Action Team established representing each program. The implementation of the plan is the responsibility of the Strategic Leadership Team and the members of the Team are accountable to each other and the Management Staff.

Through the ARC and PQI Process, Program Teams meet monthly to measure the results of work, discuss and resolve hurdles, agree on tools to use to measure, and agree as to what is being measured and why. Once a month, the Program PQI Teams' Managers meet as an Admin PQI Team to discuss success, hurdles, measurements, and results.
In answering the "5 Questions," the monthly indicators are a clear assessment as to what has been seen as successful (clients being successful) and not (clients not being successful.)
Through this process, the organization has established an Organization Action Team (OAT) which is in place to listen to the direct care workers (through a representative body) as they describe, to the decision-makers, what works, what doesn't work, what organizational hurdles impede the healing process and what suggestions they may have to help them do a better job and reach better performance goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Underserved Children and Families (natural and adoptive/foster)

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Updating publications; virtual/tele-med process; removal of OLH logos on some of the transportation vans to protect the identity of clients.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback allows the community and those we serve with a voice in regard to "how can OLH get better" at service provision and assitance/care provided.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Our Little Haven
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Our Little Haven

Board of directors
as of 3/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. William Newbold

JP MorganChase

Term: 2018 - 2025


Board co-chair

Mrs. Risa Zwerling-Wrighton

Jerry Adams

The Legends

Denise Bahlinger

Community Leader

Peter Barkofske

Graybar

Peter Baxendale

Missouri General

Mike Brennan

Every Child's Hope

Ron Cameron

Community Leader

Daniel Charles

William Blair

Maleen Corrigan

Community Leader

Joe Eppy

BKD

Steven Faust

Icon Mechanical

Ben Geis

Eagle Private Capital

Anne Golterman

Jenkins & Kling

Robert Golterman

Lewis, Rice & Fingersh

Scott Goodman

Enterprise Bank & Trust

Kate Gunn

Community Leader

Rick Heinrichs

Productivity Consultant

Glenn Heitmann

Heitmann & Associates

Maureen Heitmann

Heitmann & Associates

Kathleen Hummel

Our Little Haven

Dixie Hummel

Community Leader

Peter Hummel

Community Leader

John Irace

Packaging Concepts

Anne Kelleher

Immerse

Jim Kelleher

Nerinx Hall High School

Margy Kemp

Oaktree Products

Amanda Klenov

Retired CEO - GFI, Inc

Pat Kloster

Community Leader

Dale Kluba

BP North America

Beth Kluba

The Boeing Company

Paul Klug

Polsinelli

Mark Mager

CFO Emerson

Matthew McGrath

USI

Robert Meyer

Meyer Group

Lori Moser

Emerson

David Nestor

Enterprise Holdings

William Newbold

JP Morgan

Christine Newbold

Noboleis Vineyards

David Nieters

IBM

Carol Schuchard

CEO - Das Bevo

Jim Souers

Marcone

Daniel Tarlas

Asset Management Group

Donald Vietor

The Boeing Company

Risa Zwerling-Wrighton

Washington University

Anthony Bedford

Social Worker

Guy Slay

Community Development

Anthony Bedford

Social Worker

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.