Nurses for Newborns

aka NFN   |   St. Louis, MO   |  http://www.nursesfornewborns.org

Mission

Nurses for Newborns exists to provide a safety net for families most at-risk in order to prevent infant mortality, child abuse, and neglect by providing in-home nursing visits which promote healthcare, education, and positive parenting skills. We are saving babies & strengthening families.

Ruling year info

1992

Chief Executive Officer

Melinda Monroe MA

Main address

3 Sunnen Drive

St. Louis, MO 63143 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-1601329

NTEE code info

Home Health Care (includes Visiting Nurse Associations) (E92)

Family Services (P40)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nurses for Newborns addresses the need to ensure the survival, health, and developmental success of infants and their caregivers. Infant death occurs more frequently in many sections of the United States than in many third world nations. For many of the Missouri or Tennessee families Nurses for Newborns serves, inadequate prenatal care, and poor birth outcomes increase the risk for death and developmental challenges, including physical, cognitive and social/emotional capacities that can impact the child's entire lifetime. Nationally, children in the birth to three years category are the most likely to be maltreated, with children younger than 1 year having the highest rate of death. Even when physical abuse is not present, risk factors such as caregiver use of alcohol or drugs, untreated mental illness, or caregiver incapacity to care for the infant's basic needs directly impact the ability of the infant to progress with critical neurological development.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Nurses for Newborns Core Model is a nurse home visiting program with offices in St. Louis, Missouri and Nashville, TN.

NFN serves infants and their caregivers, both before and after birth, including mothers who have previously given birth. Services are focused on infants at greatest risk including medically fragile infants, teen parents and their infants, families headed by a parent or caregiver with intellectual or physical disabilities, or with a diagnosed mental illness, and infants from families facing severe poverty and limited access to care.

The model is guided by 26 Clinical Guidelines drawn from evidence- based home research and the agency’s two decades of effective service in two state regions. Embedded within NFN’s core model are evidence-based screening instruments and components including Nurturing Parenting, Brazelton’s Touchpoints, and Strengthening Families.





Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Family relationships
Health
Social and economic status
Adults

Where we work

Awards

National Premier Care Award 2008

Premier Care

Innovative and Effective Programming 2008

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Families, Health

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we made over 12,000 home visits to over 4,100 babies in our community.

Number of parents receiving WIC benefits for their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, Parents, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of parents engaged in fewer acts of abuse and neglect of their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

99% of infants that did not receive an injury from a household hazard. Examples include falling down an un-gated stairwell, poisoning, scalding from hot water, burn from an iron.

Number of youth and families for whom a strengths-based assessment is completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Parents, Health, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of cases monitored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, Parents, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children with age-appropriate immunization levels at age two

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, Parents, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

96% of childhood immunization up-to-date according to the current schedule published by the AAP and CDC

Number of children having a medical home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

In-Home Nurse Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The child has a specified medical doctor or clinic where they can receive appropriate medical care.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NFN's primary goals are to prevent infant death and child abuse or neglect. It pursues these major goals by achieving several measurable objectives including:
1. Absence of reported infant death
2. Absence of reported child abuse or neglect.
3. Appropriate infant immunization
4. Active use of a medical home
5. Avoidance of physical injury due to home hazard
6. Achievement of developmental progress.

NFN uses the evidence-based approach of pediatric nurse home visiting as the primary strategy for achieving the goals and objectives noted above. Nurses for Newborns is a specific model of home visitation that is recognized as a Promising Approach by federal and state governments. The NFN model provides the benefits of nurse home visiting to a wider range of individuals, including women who have given birth previously. Because the model is flexible and can be used in urban or rural settings, its services can be tailored to the needs of diverse communities as well as to the unique situation of an individual client. This primary model is enriched through the use of Community Health Workers who provide peer- to-peer assistance and support to those visited. Some CHW's also provide linguistic and cultural assistance for Arabic, Bosnian, Hispanic, Kurdish and Vietnamese clients. NFN licensed social workers provide additional mental health and material assistance for clients who are impacted by depression or other barriers to maternal and child health.

NFN recognizes that no one organization has the capacity to address all the issues impacting infant health and safety. Because of this, NFN pursues a strategy of partnership with medical centers, federally qualified health clinics, community agencies, governmental entities, universities, concerned businesses, faith communities, schools, organizations, and individuals in order to enhance participant outcomes and community wide advances in infant health. With a focus on health equity, NFN particularly pursues the reduction of infant death and child abuse or neglect in racially, economically or geographically segregated communities where these tragedies are more frequent. These partnerships facilitate referrals, expand material and service opportunities for participants, strengthen evidence supported service enhancements, and broaden the range of volunteer, financial, and community support for NFN's mission.

The strategic advantages and core capabilities afforded by NFN include: Maximum Engagement Opportunity - By engaging the child at the earliest time of development as well as the family system at a time of opportune change, caregiver behaviors that promote safety and health are more likely to be introduced and encouraged. As a result, the physical and behavioral health of the infant is less likely to be negatively impacted not only at that time but also throughout childhood. Enhanced Access - NFN brings services to the infant and her/his caregiver(s) in their home, without cost to the family, eliminating financial and transportation barriers to care access. In the home, the nurse observes the family's natural environment and dynamic, thereby eliminating any misconceptions that could be generated by service delivery in a clinic or other formal environment. Culturally Accepted Practice – Nurse visitation is understood as a health benefit that is seen as less threatening than visits by others that are frequently perceived as threats to child custody. This acceptance is enhanced through NFN's use of Community Health Workers from the community who provide language translation and guidance regarding cultural nuances. Demonstrated Effectiveness with High Risk Populations – NFN uses the evidence based approach of nurse home visiting that has been recognized for its effectiveness through numerous evaluative studies. In addition, NFN's 110,000 participants have demonstrated targeted outcomes during the past 26 years, with 99% of infants who receive core services free from a substantiated report of child abuse. Most of these infants had multiple levels of risk including medical conditions, parents with psychiatric diagnoses, teen parents, and severe poverty. Qualified Home Visitors: Licensed Registered Nurses with a minimum of 3 years practice experience in neo-natal nursing augmented by the assistance of trained mothers of the community who provide outreach to the community and assist the nurse and family in achieving outcomes. Portable Electronic Information Management Support: Each nurse visitor utilizes a laptop computer/tablet that provides consistent electronic support for each visit including nationally recognized assessment tools and teaching aids linked to NFN's 26 clinical guidelines. This supports model fidelity while enhancing the nurse's capacity to provide services tailored to the unique needs of each client. Extensive Community Support for Each Caregiver: As a result of the ongoing assistance of multiple organizations, places of worship, and individual donors, material assistance with diapers, formula, and other infant items is provided for each infant as needed through the nurse, social worker, or community health worker. IN addition, navigation to other needed services is facilitated through NFN's network of medical and community partnerships.

Nurses for Newborns most significant accomplishment during its 30 years of operations has been the successful provision of services for over 120,000 infants and their families with 99% of those evaluated to be free of any substantiated report of child abuse and neglect. The success of participants in Nurses for Newborns program in both Missouri and Tennessee, as well as its service innovation and quality has been recognized throughout the agency's history. Perhaps most notably, the Federal Administration for Health Care Research and Quality has recognized NFN as a model of innovative practice, including it in the Administration's Innovative Practices listing since 2007. NFN has received both state and national awards such as the Use Your Life Award from Oprah Winfrey's Angel Network which was presented to the agency's founder, the Paul Simon Award from Signature Health for NFN's innovative use of technology, the Ascension Health Partnership in Ministry Award, the Robert Wood Johnson Community Service Award, and the National Premier Cares Award for agency effectiveness and innovation. In 2011, NFN was admitted to the prestigious federal Services to Science Academy (SAMHSA) and in 2013, selected by both Missouri and Tennessee as a “Promising Approach" for the federal MIECHV program. NFN has received local awards from Focus St. Louis Civic Progress, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Cardinal-Glennon Hospital, and the Chambers of Commerce from Afton and Webster Groves/Shrewsbury. NFN received the Stellar Performance Award from Variety and the St. Louis and the Community Champion Award from the Institute for Family medicine, as well as the Missouri Public Health Association Group Merit Award.
With gratitude to all current and past donors and friends, Nurses for Newborns looks forward to welcoming more individuals and corporations who wish to invest in saving the lives of today's infants and shaping the direction of the future they will build. It also anticipates the recognition of the NFN model as “evidence based" by federal authorities, expansion of the model's impact for women and infants in the existing regions, focused impact on specific populations, especially women and infants impacted by the abuse of opioids, as well model replication in new areas of the state and nation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Who We Serve   Nurses for Newborns strives to serve families in our service areas that need support around their pregnancy and care for their newborn. Most often, families face one or more challenges, like infant developmental delays, physical disabilities of the parent, mental health problems, domestic abuse, access to healthcare, poverty or social constraints that affect the welfare of the child and family.   While all of our clients face at least one of these challenges, the majority experience two or more. In fact, 25% report having four or more.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Nurses for Newborns
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Nurses for Newborns

Board of directors
as of 12/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kelly Ferrara

StrattcomRX

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Honorable Cora Faith Walker

St. Louis County

Term: 2022 - 2020

Linda Dougherty

Attorney at Law, MGD Law, LLC

Honorable Patrick Doughtery

Former MO State Senator

Genie Mueller

Community Volunteer

Nanci Bobrow, Ph. D

Psychologist

Dan Green

Consultant, ICS Constructing

Suzanne Marshall-Caby, Ed.D.

Asst. VP of Operational Strategy, Maryville University

Frances Barbieri

Asst. General Counsel, World Wide Technology

Eileen Hamburg

Workplace Strategist, QDR, LLC

Kelly Ferrara

President, StratCommRX

Shanna Wiechel

Managing Principal, Operations, Christner Architects

Cora Orphe-Harris, MD

Pediatric Physician, SSM Health Cardinal Glennon

Ken Worland

Director, Gateway Division, Ameren Missouri

Michelle Miller

Consultant

Marianne Hayes

CEO/Founder, BOLA

Brad Bakker

VP, Sr. Litigation Counsel, Rabo Financial LLC

Honorable Cora Walker, Esq., MPH

St. Louis County Executive Director of Policy

Kevin Dana

VP of IT, World Wide Technology

Diana Gilbert

Digital Marketing Analyst, Nestle Purina Petcare

Laurie Hopkins

Partner, UHY, LLP

Burnea Lester

Director of Admissions, Chamberlain University School of Nursing, St. Louis Campus

Brandi Mathews

SVP, Finance, TricorBraun

Teri Murray, Ph.D

Dean Emerita, Professor St. Louis University, School of Nursing

Jagruti Anadkat, MD

Asst. Professor, Washington University, School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, Newborn Medicine

Cynthia Rogers, MD

Associate Professor Washington University, School of Medicine

Stacy West-Bruce, OTD, MSW, OTR/L

Instructor in Occupational Therapy, Washington University

Senator Brian Williams

MO State Senate, District 14

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.