The Rainbow Network, Inc.

aka Rainbow Network   |   Springfield, MO   |  www.rainbownetwork.org

Mission

Sharing in the love of Jesus Christ by partnering with Nicaragua's poorest people in healthcare, education, economic development and housing.

Ruling year info

1997

President

Megan Herrera

Main address

2840 E Chestnut Expy Suite A

Springfield, MO 65802 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Keith and Karen Jaspers Foundation

EIN

43-1720451

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nicaragua remains the 2nd poorest country in the Americas after Haiti, and has the lowest level of GDP per capita in Central America. Roughly 40% of the population still lives in poverty, while in rural areas, the rate of poverty reaches nearly 60%. While the number of persons living in poverty in Nicaragua has dropped somewhat over the last seven years, the country continues to be one of Latin America's least developed countries, where access to basic services is still a daily challenge and distress remains high. Over 2/3s of households in Nicaragua have sub-standard housing.
Many rural villagers live in unsafe shacks vulnerable to pest infestation and unsafe from theft. Sanitation is poor and there is often no electricity. Access to education and medical care as well as safe housing and adequate sanitation is a key step to building healthier communities, increasing productivity and enabling sustained economic growth.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

We operate 500 grade schools with more than 10,000 students throughout rural Nicaragua.  Rainbow Network has a high school sponsorship program with 1,20 kids presently in that program. 

Most rural areas have none or non-performing elementary schools and no high schools at all. High school students are sent to the high school in the nearest city. Sponsors pay $30 a month to send a child to high school. They exchange letters and photos.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

We have 11 full-time Nicaraguan physicians.  Our doctors go to each community every 15 days and set up clinics.  Patients are charged a small fee for the consultation and any and all medicines needed, usually about $ 1.  The doctors carry a large supply of meds with them and dispense as they go.  About 15% of our patients cannot pay and are not charged.

We operate 500 feeding centers in the communities, providing a meal to more than 10,000 children, pregnant and nursing mothers each day.

Population(s) Served
Families

We have a growing economic development program that focuses on business training, budgeting, and implementation of individual and group businesses. Businesses vary depending on the needs of a community but include sewing co-ops, bakeries, agriculture and animal husbandry projects, among others.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We build simple cement block houses with cement floors, metal roofs and doors that can close and be locked, an outdoor latrine, electricity, and fresh water outside of the house.  Currently a house costs $5,600 to build.  The people furnish the labor, then buy the house for the price of materials only and pay us back on a 20-year interest free mortgage.

These houses replace some version of a mud and stick or scrap built hut.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Excellent Partner 2009

RTI / USAID

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of schools established in rural communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Establishing more school groups means that the groups are more spread out and therefore more easily accessible to those in various rural communities. This also ensures a smaller class size.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children receiving either reinforcement in their core subjects or being taught core subjects if they are not able to attend a government school.

Number of high school scholarships awarded.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Support for youth to attend high school, including tuition, books, school supplies, uniforms, shoes, tutoring, correspondence with their sponsor, transportation, and life skills classes.

Number of community partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each community is located within one of our 9 networks, or regions of Nicaragua. Each network has 17-20 communities.

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Average number of patient visits includes both medical and dental clinics. Decrease in support in 2018 was due to civil unrest.

Number of houses built.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers reflect total number of houses completed, not those completed within that year.

Number of active donors.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Revenue per donor (year to date).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Provide tools and training for the empowerment of the people of rural Nicaragua to become a self-sustaining economy and rise out of the extreme poverty currently prevalent in their society.

Our process of bringing sustainable changes into rural communities is long term; we expect communities will be able to become self-sustainable after about 20 years. We see major changes almost immediately through basic healthcare, nutrition and basic hygiene skills learned. Within the first year we expect 80% of the beneficiaries to have improved medical and dental health, based on clinic visits and beneficiary surveys; 80% of the children to show improved nutritional outcomes based on maintaining or increasing their weight over a twelve-month period; 80% of the high school Rainbow Network scholarship recipients to show improved educational understanding based on pre- and post testing; and 90% of the families participating in the economic development program show improvement in their income. As we begin building our cement houses, we are providing a safe, secure and sanitary home for families to continue to improve and prosper.

HEALTHCARE: We employ 11 full-time doctors that travel to each of our 177 communities and provide a clinic every 15 days where they see and treat basic medical needs. Our doctors have made over 1,000,000 consultations since our beginning in 1995. They believe they have actually saved the lives of over 6,000 individuals just with their basic treatments and medications.

We operate 500 feeding centers in the communities serving one meal each day to those that are prescribed food as the main medicine required to treat their illness. Usually these are children age 12 and under, nursing and pregnant mothers and at-risk elderly. Our doctors can write a prescription for anyone in the community that is malnourished to participate in the feeding center. Malnutrition has been cut from 70% to 80% to below 8% in areas we serve.

EDUCATION: Rainbow Network's high school scholarship students are the pride and joy of their communities. Currently there are over 1,100 student high school scholarship recipients in Rainbow Network communities. In nearly all of the rural areas where we operate, there are no high schools. Even without the challenge of traveling to school, the cost of tuition, uniforms and supplies make high school out of reach for our population. Scholarships are the only means the young people have of getting a high school education.

Over 10,000 students receive an elementary education in Rainbow Network's reinforcement classes. We operate our 500 'colectivos' in private homes or community buildings. Like so many of our programs, this cornerstone of long-term community development relies on hundreds of Nicaraguan education volunteers.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Rainbow Network offers business training, budget training, and helps implement individual and group businesses. Businesses are dependent on what the needs are in a community but include sewing co-ops, bakeries, agriculture and animal husbandry project, among others.

HOUSING: 1,282 houses have been built through Rainbow Network's housing program. Typically built 25 at a time, these basic homes are made up of 580 concrete blocks, with a secure wood or metal door and a cement floor to prevent parasites. Most have access to basic electricity, and all homes require a latrine, potable water, and an outdoor cook stove to reduce smoke-related respiratory illness.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: We guide elections where leaders are voted on and are then trained to help lead each Rainbow Network effort in their community. This organization is what allows our ministry to reach nearly 60,000 people on an efficient budget. It also develops the necessary skills in the local people for communities to become self-sufficient and less reliant on outside help.

We have donors committed to continual monthly support for the students and all of our programs.

We hire and train supervisors for each program area in each of our networks and train leaders from within each community. We have thousands of volunteers working each day in our 177 communities to make sure the feeding centers, health clinics, education areas and community development are well maintained and specific guiding principals are carried out.

1. We have served more than 60 million plates of food in our feeding centers! (Our nutrition and anti-parasite programs have made huge differences, and saved the lives of many children!)

2. We have 11 full-time physicians, who have performed more than 1,000,000 consultations to people who have had no other medical options (we can only guess how many lives have been saved!)

3. More than 2,700 kids have graduated high school with Rainbow Network scholarships from remote communities where almost no one went to school before. 1,200 kids are going to high school now in that scholarship program!

4. More than 50,000 children have learned to read, write and do basic math in our elementary schools. More than 10,000 are attending now in 500 locations.

5. Our economic development program has taught hundreds of families how to improve their cash income.

6. We have completed 1,282 of our simple, but sturdy 30-year houses, made of metal, cement and love! An estimated 10,500 people moved from some version of a mud and stick hut or shanty built from scraps of plastic and wood into these decent long-term homes. They will legally own these homes and the lots they sit on when their interest free loans are paid off!

7. We started in 1995 working with about 2,500 people living in five communities. We work in 177 communities with about 60,000 people. Every family in every one of these communities benefits from one or more of our extensive programs of healthcare, nutrition, housing, economic development, and education.

We continue expanding our work and programs into new communities and as support continues we are able to open new networks and hire more Nicaraguan staff to help the people in rural Nicaragua become self sustaining.

Financials

The Rainbow Network, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Rainbow Network, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 5/3/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charles Sauer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/03/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability