COMFORT FOR AMERICAS UNIFORMED SERVICES

...here for those who are there for us.

aka Cause   |   Arlington, VA   |  www.cause-usa.org

Mission

Cause organizes programs that promote recreation, relaxation and resiliency for wounded, ill and injured members of the US Armed Services and those supporting their recovery. Programs are conducted at nine military medical treatment facilities in the US and at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany.

Ruling year info

2004

President, Board of Directors

LTG John Caldwell US Army (Retired)

Main address

4201 Wilson Blvd #110-284

Arlington, VA 22203 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-2037202

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

Patient Services - Entertainment, Recreation (E86)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Cause programs provide opportunities for recreation, relaxation and resiliency for wounded, ill, and injured members of the U.S. Armed Services and those supporting their recovery. To recover physically and emotionally, wounded warriors need more than medical care alone. They need engaging social interaction, pleasurable activities designed to combat isolation and depression, and tangible expressions of appreciation and support from a grateful nation. Cause steps in to provide that support to wounded servicemen and women, their families and their caregivers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cause Digital Entertainment Library (CDEL)

C-DEL provides free and easy access to DVDs, video games and gaming systems. Often the only source of free entertainment on military posts, the library is one of the most popular Cause programs. Since the first C-DEL branch opened at Walter Reed in 2005, over 200,000 lending transactions have been recorded. 
In addition to being popular entertainment, video games also have therapeutic value. Recent studies have shown that playing video games can activate the parasympathetic nervous system and reduce heightened tension related to stress. There is even research showing that playing Tetris, a puzzle video game, may reduce PTSD flashbacks. C-DEL's greatest value, however, lies in the interaction that occurs between wounded, ill and injured service members and members of the community

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Caregivers

The military is using massage, Reiki, reflexology and other complementary and alternative modalities to reduce stress and pain, and help with the effects of PTSD. The demand for these modalities far exceeds the current military capacity. Cause programs are helping to meet this critical need; the participating practitioners and instructors meet all relevant state credentialing requirements and have attended workshops addressing the special needs of military wounded.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Caregivers

Simple pleasures that many take for granted -- like watching a movie or playing a video game -- can make a world of difference to someone who is immobile, someone confined to a hospital bed, someone with empty hours to fill waiting for the next medical procedure. Cause game carts bring the gift of fun and relaxation to the hospital bedside of a wounded, ill and injured service members or into the waiting rooms of VA hospitals. Game Carts are also used as part of physical therapy at VA Polytrauma Centers.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Caregivers

A gift pack is a great way to send a personal "thank you" to wounded, ill and injured military personnel. Gift packs -- filled with items designed to bring a bit of comfort and information on wellness topics to include sleep, stress reduction, mindfullness, and resilience.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Caregivers

Cause conducts monthly events such as Family Fun Night, UFC Fight Night and other opportunities for wounded, ill and injured service members and their families to interact and socialize.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Caregivers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations

Related Program

Massage, Reiki & Reflexology Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Cause organizes programs that promote recreation, relaxation and resilience for wounded, ill, and injured members of the U.S. Armed Services and those supporting their recovery.

Massage, Reiki, and Reflexology Program (MRR)
Cause Digital Library (C-DEL)
Special Events

We are connected to the units who care for our nations Wounded, Ill, and Injured.

Since 2003, Cause has:

Touched the lives of our country's military wounded and their families over 363,000 different times.

Lent over 349,100 FREE movies and video games through the Cause Digital Entertainment Libraries (C-DELs).

Provided over 10,700 massage, Reiki, and reflexology treatments to ease the pain and suffering of warriors and their families who are suffering from PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury, and other injuries. In 2014, our treatments resulted in an average 46% decrease in stress and 37% decrease in pain. 94% of participants also reported an increase in sleep quality and duration.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

COMFORT FOR AMERICAS UNIFORMED SERVICES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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COMFORT FOR AMERICAS UNIFORMED SERVICES

Board of directors
as of 12/2/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

LTG John Caldwell

The Spectrum Group

Theresa Rudacille

John Jorgenson

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

J.P. (Jack) London

CACI International, Inc.

Edward Sullivan

Deputy Executive Director, American Academy of Audiology

Joyce Doheny

Founding Member

John Caldwell

SVP, The Spectrum Group

Harry Rothmann

Association of the US Army

Lesley Lavalleye

Robert Doheny

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/2/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data