Clay County Clothes Closet

Kansas City, MO   |  www.claycountyclothescloset.org

Mission

Assist in restoring dignity, self-respect, and hope to those families residing in the Kansas City Northland Community, where circumstances have denied them basic human needs, such as adequate clothing, through nonjudgmental service by dedicated and committed volunteers.

Notes from the nonprofit

Clay County Clothes Closet's clothing resource program was established (62) years ago in response to a critical need for sustainable clothing to help impoverished students remain in school and be accepted by the community in which they resided. The program model continues to meet these outcomes today, is inclusive to all family members and empowers family financial stability.

Ruling year info

1961

Principal Officer

Ms. Deborah M Butler

Main address

P.O. Box 46625

Kansas City, MO 64188 USA

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EIN

43-6057988

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clothing Northland Families in Need

Working in close partnership with a number of other organizations which provide needs assessments and referrals, CCCC offers each individual served the opportunity to select a new wardrobe of clothing appropriate for maintaining their lives in the community.  All program participants receive an amount of clothing adequate to sustain them for a one-week period.  All individuals served receive new undergarments and socks.  Children also receive new jeans, new shirts, new coat, new shoes and all participants receive a variety of gently used clothing to complete their wardrobe.  With a program expansion which commenced in the 3rd quarter of 2018, employed youth and adults have the opportunity to select new work shoes which meets the requirement for their specific work environment.  What sets our program apart from others in our Community is we serve the entire family from newborn to senior citizen.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Clay County Social Services Agencies, multiple area school districts and Northland Community churches partner with our Organization by bringing awareness of our free clothing resource to low-income families and individuals.  The organization partners with area school districts in their "Back to School Fairs", where information about our resource is distributed and on-site appointments are made for the low-income families in attendance.  Area churches partner to assist in meeting The Clothes Closet's need for underwear and socks by hosting "Undie Sundays".  Area schools and businesses host clothing drives to assist in providing the Clothes Closet with new and gently used clothing.  Area Service Groups, such as Rotary Clubs, relay the Clothes Closet's story of serving low income families and individuals via media publications during community events such as the KC Royals Day.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 2017

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By providing sustainable clothing that fits program participant's personal style and need for school, work and community activities, Clay County Clothes Closet's program empowers individuals with an improved self-image to help position them to success in school and in the workforce. Additionally, by meeting the clothing needs of every family member, the program assists in freeing up limited financial resources for other basic human needs such as food and housing.

Clothing Families - Empowering Lives program is expected to serve 2,900 impoverished individuals referred for assistance in 2020. With participant's need predetermined by partner referring agencies, CCCC Volunteer Staff will continue to focus on providing participants with a caring and dignified shopping experience. Assisted through personal consultations, participants will select a complete wardrobe of clothing, meeting their personal need and style for school, work and community activities, sustaining them for a 1-week period and helping to position them for success in school and work. All participants will receive new undergarments and socks. Additionally, children will select new jeans, shirts, coat and shoes. All participants will receive gently used clothing items donated by the community to complete their wardrobe which includes clothing selections for every season of the year. Employed teens and adults will receive a voucher for the purchase of new workplace required footwear to assist them in maintaining employment and meeting their employer's safety/uniform requirements. By providing clothing for all family members, limited financial resources will be available for other basic human needs such as food and housing.

Serving continuously for (61) years, Clay County Clothes Closet has a proven record of meeting the stated outcomes. Funding initiatives to support the program include foundation grant submissions, fundraising initiatives, partnerships with businesses, civic organizations and churches and individual donations.

The organization owns the building where the clothing resource program is facilitated. The program is operated and managed for a staff of (50) volunteers and their is no paid staff. 100% of the funding received is used to support the program.

In 2019, the following objectives were achieved:

2,721 individuals received a sustainable wardrobe of clothing
1,363 at-risk children had their ill-fitting worn-out clothing replaced
(884) families - Every family member received sustainable clothing freeing up limited financial resources for food and housing.
(33,379) new clothing items were selected by participants
(81,205) gently-used clothing items were selected by participants
(50) volunteers donated 10,059 hours to facilitate the clothing resource program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Partnering with school districts and social service agencies providing needs assessments and referrals, the "Clothing Families - Empowering Lives" program directly serves over 2,700 individuals annually comprised from the 9% of households living below the poverty level in Kansas City Northland Community, primarily in Clay County, MO. Families and individuals referred receive TANF or have an IEP, students are designated as homeless or in foster care, meet poverty guidelines, qualify for assistance programs including free and/or reduced lunch, food stamps and TANF4, unemployment, and individuals displaced due to domestic violence. Program serves every household member from newborn to senior citizen. Program uses a language provider service to reach and serve non-English speaking participants

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Google Reviews and Feedback,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through an electronic survey inquiry concerning employer's requirement for workplace/industry-required footwear, the clothing resource program expanded to include vouchers for employed participants to provide new industry required work shoes, removing barriers to sustainable employment.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Knowing the organization is not only listening to our program participant's needs but implementing program enhancements to meet those needs, helps participants feel valued and included in the process.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Clay County Clothes Closet
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Clay County Clothes Closet

Board of directors
as of 5/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Marty Hill

Self-Employed Art Instructor

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Kirk Davis

Retired, Gladstone, MO City Manager

Term: 2019 - 2021

Debbie Lane

Retired NKC Schools Elementary Counselor & Teacher

Deborah Butler

St. James Lutheran Church, Office Manager

Alisha O'Hara

Clay County 7th Circuit Court Judge

Jan McSpadden

Retired School Nurse

Gary Lint

Retired Engineer

Marty Hill

Art Instructor, Self-Employed

Heide McCleery

Retired Park Hill School District Teacher

Kirk Davis

Retired City Manager-Gladstone, MO

Herbert Debra

DGH Bookkeeping Services LLC

O'Mealy-Simmons Juli

Kansas City KS Public Schools, Grant Manager

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability